Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLarry Kramer
IN THE NEWS

Larry Kramer

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Dunn and Stephen Dunn,HARTFORD COURANT | April 27, 2004
NEW YORK - Before Ellen, Will & Grace and Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, before "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," domestic-partner benefits and gay marriage, before AIDS, there was Larry Kramer, movie producer, writer and self-described pain declaring that being gay was not about stereotypes, shame or sex. But when the AIDS epidemic hit in the '80s, Kramer found his most important role in life, one that would transform him, help redefine the gay community and...
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
As I watched HBO's new film "The Normal Heart" this weekend, sharp memories kept flashing through my mind of emaciated young people wracked with sores and dying before my eyes. They are memories I shouldn't have, memories most gay men my age thankfully lack. I was born in 1985 - the same year as the premier of Larry Kramer's Tony Award-winning play on the start of the AIDS epidemic in New York City's gay community, which "The Normal Heart" was adapted from. Thanks to a host of drugs now available to HIV-positive people in the United States, I count myself among a generation of American gay men who never had to watch thousands of our peers rapidly deteriorate from perfect health to death's doorstep because of a monstrous, unnamed disease.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 6, 1999
Two plays that deal, at least in part, with growing up and coming of age are among the new offerings on Baltimore stages. Former Marylander David Drake's one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" -- a semi-autobiographical portrait of the gay artist as a young man -- will make its Baltimore debut at the Theatre Project on Wednesday. And Dianne McIntyre's salute to her father, "I Could Stop on a Dime and Get Ten Cents Change," is the last show of the season at Center Stage.Drake's hit off-Broadway show, much of which is set in Maryland, will be filmed for release as an independent feature before an invited audience at the Theatre Project, immediately after its public engagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
HBO's "The Normal Heart" will do something to you that TV rarely does: rock you to your emotional roots. The power of this HBO movie starring Mark Ruffalo, Julia Roberts and Jim Parsons is such that you can forget about turning off the TV after the final credits roll and going to bed as you might with most made-for-TV movies. This one, adapted by Larry Kramer from his Tony Award-winning 1985 play, will keep you up for hours in an emotional churn thinking about life, love, loss, death and politics.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 7, 1994
When actor/playwright David Drake returns to Baltimore tomorrow to sign copies of his newly published script, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," he will have come full circle.Not only is the script the semi-autobiographical story of his coming of age as a gay man in Maryland, but before the New York premiere of "Larry Kramer" in 1992, Drake tried out parts of the one-man show at Towson State University and Maryland Art Place.Since then, the 30-year-old boyish-looking performer won one of off-Broadway's coveted Obie Awards for his performance in "Larry Kramer."
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | March 9, 1992
GAIETY TRANSFIGURED. By David Bergman. University of Wisconsin Press. 237 pages. $24.95. MANY PEOPLE still believe that homosexuals are sick or sinful, contemptible or even comical, but a growing number, including some heterosexuals, are persuaded that being (and acting) gay is natural in about one in 10 persons, should not be shunned and certainly should not be made illegal.David Bergman, author of this collection of essays about homosexual writers, is a gay man, a professor of English at Towson State University, frequent contributor to this page and -- not surprisingly -- definitely pro-homosexual.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | August 13, 1993
Chicago. -- Larry Kramer is best known as the founder of Act-Up, the group that dramatizes AIDS desperation by means of street-theater antics. The organization's initials stand for AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power.Kramer is considered an extremist, the kind of gay militant who creates more antagonism than understanding, because of the aggressive style of Act-Up. There is no doubting his abrasiveness. He is good at making enemies. But he is far from an extremist in most of his views.Kramer was not only the first gay activist in New York to recognize the scale of the AIDS crisis, but also the first to make an issue of gay response to that crisis.
FEATURES
By Tribune Media Services | December 17, 2007
WHAT WE generically call Broadway covered itself with glory last week when Bernadette Peters and Glenn Close tossed a real showbiz party to celebrate John Travolta's performance playing a woman in the hit film Hair- spray. And now with awards season upon us, there is hope for an Oscar nod in John's direction. Hairspray producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron were also honorees. They are men who constantly seek to celebrate the triumphs of The Great White Way by taking its material to the screen.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
Not long ago, the thought of transplanting a kidney into salesman Derek Kee, a heart into statistician Robert Zackin or a liver into playwright Larry Kramer would have defied all reason. All suffered from HIV infection before their organs went bad, and under the old rules, the drugs needed to protect their transplants would surely have crippled their immune systems even more. Giving scarce organs to patients who didn't have long to live was considered wasteful, even unethical. Like so many things about AIDS, that view is slowly giving way to another, articulated by Dr. Stephen T. Bartlett, a surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center who performed Kee's transplant last month.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
As I watched HBO's new film "The Normal Heart" this weekend, sharp memories kept flashing through my mind of emaciated young people wracked with sores and dying before my eyes. They are memories I shouldn't have, memories most gay men my age thankfully lack. I was born in 1985 - the same year as the premier of Larry Kramer's Tony Award-winning play on the start of the AIDS epidemic in New York City's gay community, which "The Normal Heart" was adapted from. Thanks to a host of drugs now available to HIV-positive people in the United States, I count myself among a generation of American gay men who never had to watch thousands of our peers rapidly deteriorate from perfect health to death's doorstep because of a monstrous, unnamed disease.
FEATURES
By Tribune Media Services | December 17, 2007
WHAT WE generically call Broadway covered itself with glory last week when Bernadette Peters and Glenn Close tossed a real showbiz party to celebrate John Travolta's performance playing a woman in the hit film Hair- spray. And now with awards season upon us, there is hope for an Oscar nod in John's direction. Hairspray producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron were also honorees. They are men who constantly seek to celebrate the triumphs of The Great White Way by taking its material to the screen.
FEATURES
By Stephen Dunn and Stephen Dunn,HARTFORD COURANT | April 27, 2004
NEW YORK - Before Ellen, Will & Grace and Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, before "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," domestic-partner benefits and gay marriage, before AIDS, there was Larry Kramer, movie producer, writer and self-described pain declaring that being gay was not about stereotypes, shame or sex. But when the AIDS epidemic hit in the '80s, Kramer found his most important role in life, one that would transform him, help redefine the gay community and...
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 23, 2003
Not long ago, the thought of transplanting a kidney into salesman Derek Kee, a heart into statistician Robert Zackin or a liver into playwright Larry Kramer would have defied all reason. All suffered from HIV infection before their organs went bad, and under the old rules, the drugs needed to protect their transplants would surely have crippled their immune systems even more. Giving scarce organs to patients who didn't have long to live was considered wasteful, even unethical. Like so many things about AIDS, that view is slowly giving way to another, articulated by Dr. Stephen T. Bartlett, a surgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center who performed Kee's transplant last month.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 10, 1999
Although much of David Drake's semi-autobiographical one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," takes place in his home state of Maryland, he has never performed the entire show here -- until now.Beginning Wednesday, Drake will repeat his Obie Award-winning performance at the Theatre Project, where the show -- a portrait of the artist as a gay young man -- will be filmed before a live audience for release as an independent feature."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 6, 1999
Two plays that deal, at least in part, with growing up and coming of age are among the new offerings on Baltimore stages. Former Marylander David Drake's one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me" -- a semi-autobiographical portrait of the gay artist as a young man -- will make its Baltimore debut at the Theatre Project on Wednesday. And Dianne McIntyre's salute to her father, "I Could Stop on a Dime and Get Ten Cents Change," is the last show of the season at Center Stage.Drake's hit off-Broadway show, much of which is set in Maryland, will be filmed for release as an independent feature before an invited audience at the Theatre Project, immediately after its public engagement.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 7, 1994
When actor/playwright David Drake returns to Baltimore tomorrow to sign copies of his newly published script, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," he will have come full circle.Not only is the script the semi-autobiographical story of his coming of age as a gay man in Maryland, but before the New York premiere of "Larry Kramer" in 1992, Drake tried out parts of the one-man show at Towson State University and Maryland Art Place.Since then, the 30-year-old boyish-looking performer won one of off-Broadway's coveted Obie Awards for his performance in "Larry Kramer."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
HBO's "The Normal Heart" will do something to you that TV rarely does: rock you to your emotional roots. The power of this HBO movie starring Mark Ruffalo, Julia Roberts and Jim Parsons is such that you can forget about turning off the TV after the final credits roll and going to bed as you might with most made-for-TV movies. This one, adapted by Larry Kramer from his Tony Award-winning 1985 play, will keep you up for hours in an emotional churn thinking about life, love, loss, death and politics.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 10, 1999
Although much of David Drake's semi-autobiographical one-man show, "The Night Larry Kramer Kissed Me," takes place in his home state of Maryland, he has never performed the entire show here -- until now.Beginning Wednesday, Drake will repeat his Obie Award-winning performance at the Theatre Project, where the show -- a portrait of the artist as a gay young man -- will be filmed before a live audience for release as an independent feature."
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | August 13, 1993
Chicago. -- Larry Kramer is best known as the founder of Act-Up, the group that dramatizes AIDS desperation by means of street-theater antics. The organization's initials stand for AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power.Kramer is considered an extremist, the kind of gay militant who creates more antagonism than understanding, because of the aggressive style of Act-Up. There is no doubting his abrasiveness. He is good at making enemies. But he is far from an extremist in most of his views.Kramer was not only the first gay activist in New York to recognize the scale of the AIDS crisis, but also the first to make an issue of gay response to that crisis.
NEWS
By John Goodspeed | March 9, 1992
GAIETY TRANSFIGURED. By David Bergman. University of Wisconsin Press. 237 pages. $24.95. MANY PEOPLE still believe that homosexuals are sick or sinful, contemptible or even comical, but a growing number, including some heterosexuals, are persuaded that being (and acting) gay is natural in about one in 10 persons, should not be shunned and certainly should not be made illegal.David Bergman, author of this collection of essays about homosexual writers, is a gay man, a professor of English at Towson State University, frequent contributor to this page and -- not surprisingly -- definitely pro-homosexual.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.