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Larry King

NEWS
By Sandy Grady | June 7, 1995
Washington -- WHEN YOU glance at the tube and see Bill Clinton on "Larry King Live" doing an imitation of Marlon Brando, you can have three unnerving suspicions:You've stumbled into a rerun of the 1992 campaign.It's winter 1996 and you've awakened from a long coma.Bill Clinton never stops running for the White House.Guess No. 3 would be correct. You're sane, the calendar's not out of whack. But politicians are prematurely afflicting us with 1996 presidential lusts.Never mind that there are 259 days to the New Hampshire primary.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | December 25, 1992
Talk show host Larry King's plan to move his two-way conversations from late-night to mid-afternoon in February will cost him his berth on Baltimore's big WBAL-AM (1090). And it remains to be seen whether local listeners will be able to hear him at all."It's a shame. We had every intention of keeping Larry King on overnight, but he will not air on WBAL in the afternoon," says station vice president and general manager Jeff Beauchamp.Taking the King show in its planned 3 to 6 p.m. slot Feb. 1, he says, would mean cutting back on "The Ron Smith Show," heard now from 1 to 4 p.m., and eliminating two hours of the station's news roundup that begins at 4 p.m."
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | December 1, 1995
WHEN LARRY King gives a party, there are few regrets. He's expecting more than 400 people to attend "An Evening With Larry King and Friends" this evening at the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington.The party is a benefit for the Larry King Cardiac Foundation, established by King in 1988 to provide money for people, who, due to limited means and insurance, would be otherwise unable to receive a heart transplant.Last year's gala raised more than $120,000, which was earmarked for Baltimore teacher Larry Wineke.
NEWS
May 29, 1995
Christopher Reeve hurt in horse-jumping eventWhile engaging in a horse jumping competition Saturday, Christopher Reeve was thrown from his steed and wound up in the hospital.Mr. Reeve, 42, was approaching the third jump of a 15-jump course when "something spooked the horse," said Monk Reynolds, owner of Commonwealth Park in Culpeper, Va. "His horse just stopped dead and threw him."Mr. Reeve, best known for his performances in the "Superman" movies, appeared to suffer a neck injury and was carried off the field on a stretcher.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Writer | October 1, 1992
Monday night Larry King did Dallas and got lots of publicity.In fact, every time Larry King hooks up with on-again-off-again presidential candidate Ross Perot, he generates lots of publicity and water-cooler buzz.But a question seldom asked when discussing what an important force in American politics CNN's "Larry King Live" show seems to have become is just how many people actually watch the show on a regular basis. There are other questions, too, such as why Perot and King keep getting together and what happens in terms of ratings and politics when they do.On a regular basis, more people watch nightly reruns of Jessica Fletcher in "Murder She Wrote" on cable channel USA than watch Larry King.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
Politicians are people too -- and that can put them in a tough spot. When Vice President Dan Quayle spoke as a father first and indicated to talk show host Larry King this week that he would support whatever decision his 13-year-old daughter would make about abortion, he found himself the center of another media feeding frenzy.And no wonder. The remark, a response to a hypothetical question, stood in stark contrast to the political platform he represents.Predictably, it triggered a barrage of ridicule from one side of the abortion debate and a responding round of defensive explanations from the other.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 3, 1994
Take the night off. For the most part, TV has.* "Fall From Grace" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Part 2 of 2. Plans for the Normandy invasion are developed, hidden and eagerly sought in the conclusion of this imported miniseries, which makes the plans for D-Day seem almost as important as whether an Allied agent (Tara Fitzgerald) will be faithful to a fellow agent (Gary Cole), and whether he, in turn, will fall for the advances of another fellow agent (Patsy Kensit). In the end, the Allies conquer the Germans, and love conquers all. Michael York plays a sinister Nazi with more subtlety than expected.
NEWS
September 7, 2000
HERE'S YOUR choice next Tuesday night as you curl up on your sofa and ponder which TV show to watch. Will it be "Who Wants to be a Millionaire"? "NYPD Blue"? Or a conversation between Al Gore and George W. Bush? In the ratings game, the Gore-Bush debate would finish last. That may be what Mr. Bush, the Republican presidential nominee, seeks: a debate format short in length, suitable to his informal style and largely unwatched. That's the impression the Texas governor is leaving. He looks like he's trying to manipulate this year's presidential debates for his own strategic purposes.
SPORTS
June 2, 2010
One month from the start of the NBA's free agency frenzy, LeBron James has handicapped his field of suitors and says the Cavaliers lead the pack. In his first interview since the Cavs' season ended with a shocking second-round loss to Boston, James told CNN's Larry King that Cleveland has "an edge" to re-sign him when the greatest collection of free agents in league history hits the open market on July 1. King, who interviewed James on Tuesday at the two-time MVP's home near Akron, asked the superstar if Cleveland has "an edge going in?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,Sun Book Editor | May 23, 2004
Remember Me When I'm Gone, by Larry King. Doubleday. 213 pages. $19.95. This is one of those trick books that seem all too easy (Why didn't I do that?), but work well because both the idea and the implementation are sound. King, of course, has interviewed more people that most cemeteries could contain. Encouraged by his agent, he confronted an array of notables with the question "How would you like to be remembered after your death?" More than 300 responses are published here, and are delightful, touching or in some cases revealingly absurd.
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