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Baltimore Sun staff | December 19, 2011
Former NBA coach Larry Brown visited the Maryland men's basketball program recently. Terps coach Mark Turgeon played for Brown at Kansas. Check out video of Brown's visit below.
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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - As different as the gym rat and blue-chip star seemed on the surface, Mark Turgeon and Danny Manning had a lot in common when they became teammates and best friends playing for Larry Brown at Kansas in the 1980s. "They've got the same values, they were great teammates, they were really cerebral, both grew up with families that were involved in the game," Brown recalled in a telephone interview Saturday. "The biggest difference is that one guy is 5-[foot-]10 and the other guy is 6-10.
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By Jon Volkmer | December 3, 1990
BIG BAD LOVE. By Larry Brown. Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. 240 pages. $17.95.LARRY BROWN beat the odds. He sat around the fire department in Yacona, Miss., for a dozen years, thinking he ought to be a writer. One day he got a deal on a second-hand typewriter and set to.No writing program, no contacts, no idea of what was hot and what was not. All Larry Brown had was a sure sense of himself, a roll of stamps and a lot of manila envelopes. His first sale was to Easy Rider, the magazine of Harleys and bare breasts.
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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Mark Turgeon's first 19 months at Maryland had been without barely a ripple of discord, at least in public. The players -- even talented but troubled guard Terrell Stoglin last season -- seemed to take Turgeon's harshest criticism in stride. The media -- many who fussed and fueded with first-year football coach Randy Edsall -- appreciated his honesty. The fans -- who for the past few years had been split when it came to Gary Williams -- adored his down-to-earth nature and never second-guessed his moves.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
When Doug Collins awoke in his Scottsdale, Ariz., home yesterday morning and found there were four messages on his cell phone, he told his wife he knew he was about to be fired as coach of the Washington Wizards. His hunch turned out to be correct as the Wizards moved to purge the organization of the remnants of Michael Jordan's 3 1/2 years, dismissing the coach he hand-picked to guide his return to the court from retirement. And Collins, more or less, endorsed the move. "Sometimes, you need to make a change simply because you've got to change the environment," said Collins in a conference call last night with reporters.
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By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | December 2, 2005
NEW YORK -- Larry Brown has coached eight teams over 23 seasons in the NBA, and hundreds of players, so it's not unusual for him to return to a city where he has worked before or to see history repeat itself in the way his relationships evolve. As the New York Knicks head to Detroit for a game tonight against Brown's most recent former employer, the Pistons, the 65-year-old coach is trying to figure out a rotation with a team beset by early-season injuries and an approach to take with yet another troubled point guard.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
If Phil Jackson has what Larry Brown wants, Brown sure isn't letting on. Jackson, the nine-time NBA champion coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, brings an overwhelming favorite into tonight's opener of the NBA Finals. Brown, hired in the offseason specifically to get the Detroit Pistons to this level, has no titles on his professional resume. But with all the story lines available heading into this NBA championship series, Brown's quest for a ring is not one of them, or at least he's determined not to let it become one. "I think it means more to other people that are close to me than me," Brown said of the championship chase the other day. "Of course, at the beginning of the season our goal is to win an NBA championship, and that will always be the case.
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June 21, 1991
Tanja Mertina Brown-O'Neal, an employee of the Baltimore Department of Social Services, was killed Tuesday at the Rosemont Multipurpose Center, where she had worked for about a year. She was 29.Services will be held Monday at 11 a.m. at Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, 1300 Druid Hill Ave.The attacker was shot by a private security guard and captured.The former Tanja Brown was born in Baltimore and attended Baltimore schools, graduating from Walbrook High School in 1979. She earned an associate's degree fromthe Community College of Baltimore, then attended Coppin State College, where she received a bachelor's degree in social sciences in 1989.
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By IRA WINDERMAN and IRA WINDERMAN,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 1, 2006
Depending on the whims of Charlotte Bobcats coach/president Bernie Bickerstaff, something remarkable could happen on the NBA sidelines this offseason. Nothing. A league that changes coaches more often than the Heat changes playoff color schemes could wind up returning each of the 30 who ended the season on the bench. Almost all of those in the most tenuous positions - from Golden State's Mike Montgomery to Atlanta's Mike Woodson to Toronto's Sam Mitchell to Minnesota's Dwane Casey to Seattle's Bob Hill - have received recent votes of confidence.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2004
ATHENS - The U.S. men's basketball team must have visited the Olympic lost-and-found on its day off. After being nearly a scoring no-show for five games, Stephon Marbury found his touch yesterday and atoned with 31 points - a U.S. men's Olympic record - to lead the Americans to a 102-94 victory over previously unbeaten Spain in a quarterfinal matchup. The Americans play Argentina tonight in the semifinals. On a day when rebounding was a struggle and four players were in foul trouble, Marbury's sudden arrival after scoring just 21 points in the tournament made the difference.
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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Welcome back to Morning Shootaround, which will be a regular feature this season the day after Maryland basketball games. While we can't bring you into the Terps' locker room after games - reporters haven't been allowed in there since the last couple of years under Gary Williams - we will recap what was said in the press conference afterward by Maryland coach Mark Turgeon and his players. We will give some of our own insight into what transpired on the court during the previous night's game and what the Terps will be working on at practice looking ahead to their next game . Maryland 70, Georgia Southern 53 @ Comcast Center, Saturday 3-point shots Considering Mark Turgeon's coaching tree, there's a certain amount of stubborness involved when making in-game decisions.
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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
COLLEGE PARK - One year ago, Mark Turgeon brought his Maryland basketball team to play in a tournament in Puerto Rico, where not even the swaying palm trees and balmy trade winds could make up for the coach's dissatisfaction with his players' efforts. Turgeon, then in his first year with the Terps, was a portrait of distress, stamping his feet on the sideline and calling out his players for a lack of commitment. While tourists at his beachfront hotel sipped mojitos, Turgeon endured a kidney stone - a suitable metaphor for a trying season in which he often seemed mismatched with players he had inherited from Gary Williams.
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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
If you were pitching Maryland basketball to recruits, what (and who?) would you emphasize most? That was the challenge facing coach Mark Turgeon, who is  giving his office a makeover that he hopes will appeal to recruits and other visitors. He wants displays that will imprint on the important guests. The basketball suite has plenty of wall space - - a veritable canvas for the coach. Here's what Turgeon chose to highlight: Maryland's basketball tradition and accomplishments, the school's membership in the “premier college basketball conference in the nation,” the Comcast Center and proximity to Washington and Baltimore, the ties to Under Armour and the coach's own lineage.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Maryland coach Mark Turgeon has plenty to be concerned about. Road games, for one. The Terps (12-5, 2-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) are winless in their first two Atlantic Coast Conference away games, surrendering an average of 81.5 points — far too many to suit the defensive-minded coach. In recent games, the young Terps have lacked a reliable second scorer to complement sophomore Terrell Stoglin, who has taken nearly twice as many shots this season as any teammate. The team's inexperience is often exposed.
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Baltimore Sun staff | December 19, 2011
Former NBA coach Larry Brown visited the Maryland men's basketball program recently. Terps coach Mark Turgeon played for Brown at Kansas. Check out video of Brown's visit below.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
There are times when coach Mark Turgeon is a portrait of anguish on the Maryland sideline. He'll stamp his feet. He'll crouch in front of the bench and lower his head between his legs. He'll gaze up at the rafters, as if searching for inspiration. Fans might imagine that Turgeon's suffering is directly tied to losing games, but it's more complicated than that. Strange as may seem, Turgeon — the ultra-competitive former Kansas point guard who once said, "I'd fight anybody that got in my way" — says winning should not be dominating his thoughts, nor those of his young, depth-challenged team.
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By Diane Scharper | November 24, 1991
JOE.Larry Brown.Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill.345 pages. $19.95. Joe looks back at the old man and the boy as they face each other in the dust of the road. Then he sees the man throw the boy onto the ground. The boy is on his back, holding his pockets. The old man paws at him. Joe doesn't wait to see any more.Readers familiar with Larry Brown's powerful anti-war novel, "Dirty Work," and with his two collections of short stories, will recognize the misbegotten characters who people "Joe," his second novel.
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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
State police yesterday captured a 16-year-old murderer four hours after he escaped from prison security guards at Baltimore-Washington International Airport as he was boarding a plane.Authorities said David Manuel Bailey, convicted of second degree murder in Washington earlier this year, was on his way to a Colorado treatment center when he bolted after his handcuffs were removed near a United Airlines terminal shortly after 8 a.m.The youth ran through the terminal and a front door. Police lost him on Interstate 195, the main road leading into the airport.
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By Matt Vensel | May 12, 2011
Maryland men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon impressed many people -- this sports blogger included -- during Wednesday's introductory press conference. But he made a strong impression on Lefty Driesell, who coached Maryland from 1969 to 1986, long before Turgeon was picked to replace Gary Williams. Driesell was the coach at Georgia State when Turgeon coached at conference rival Jacksonville State from 1998 to 2000. Even though Driesell mean-mugged Turgeon before games (as Turgeon pointed out Wednesday)
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By Jeff Barker and Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2011
In the summer of 1983, an undersized, unrecruited point guard arrived unannounced in new coach Larry Brown's office at Kansas. After talking with him for a few moments, Brown gave Mark Turgeon a spot on the team. "I beat [Division II] Washburn for him," Brown joked. "He had gone to the basketball camp at Kansas for years and he said, 'Coach, I'm as good or better than any of the guards you have.' He was about 5-7 and about 140 pounds. He probably grew to 5-9 and 160. He ended up starting for me as a freshman when another freshman became ineligible and we wound up winning the Big 8. " Twenty-eight years later, Turgeon, 46, — who will be formally introduced as Maryland's men's basketball coach at noon Wednesday at Comcast Center — still possesses a feistiness often associated with smaller players in a big man's game.
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