Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLarry Adler
IN THE NEWS

Larry Adler

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 8, 2001
FROM THE TIME he won an Evening Sun harmonica competition as a youngster, Larry Adler pushed the envelope for that humble instrument. A few years later, he was a star of vaudeveille, then radio and movies. The wise-cracking, short young man from Baltimore was a giant of showbiz in the 1930s for whom the leading classical composers of the day wrote concertos. He was all mouth when not playing his beloved mouth organ, and all ear when he was. Self-taught, memorizing music by listening to it once, he played with the leading symphony orchestras before he could read music.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | November 23, 2003
A few months ago this column noted that a different caliber of leadership was alive, and mostly still active, in Israel when I first arrived there 30 years ago. David Ben-Gurion, Golda Meir, Moshe Dayan, Abba Eban and other titans in the founding of the modern Jewish state were present. But the man with whom I spent much more time was not a founder of the Jewish state. He would be the first to laugh about his name even being included with those heroes of Zion. His name was Freddie Weisgal.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
The harmonica virtuoso Larry Adler was 15 years old and trying to get a job with the Paul Whiteman Orchestra in Manhattan when he met George Gershwin."
NEWS
August 8, 2001
FROM THE TIME he won an Evening Sun harmonica competition as a youngster, Larry Adler pushed the envelope for that humble instrument. A few years later, he was a star of vaudeveille, then radio and movies. The wise-cracking, short young man from Baltimore was a giant of showbiz in the 1930s for whom the leading classical composers of the day wrote concertos. He was all mouth when not playing his beloved mouth organ, and all ear when he was. Self-taught, memorizing music by listening to it once, he played with the leading symphony orchestras before he could read music.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Bill Glauber and Carl Schoettler and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
Larry Adler was a tough little kid from Baltimore with a quick wit, a sharp tongue and an immense talent for playing the harmonica. When he died in London yesterday from cancer and "an accumulation of many things," according to his literary agent, Diana Tyler, Adler, 87, was still a brilliant, testy, raconteur and a nonpareil virtuoso of the harmonica. He had single-handedly made the lowly mouth organ into a serious concert hall instrument, and he remained the instrument's singular master.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | September 21, 1993
WHAT might you have done for some entertainment on Saturday, June 2, 1928?You might have gone to the flower show at the Women's Civic League, 108 W. Mulberry St.There were a couple of forgettable movies, "Dragnet" at the Century, "Yellow Lily" at the Stanley. An equally forgettable play, "Women Go on Forever," was at Ford's. The pickings were fairly slim.But there was some activity over at the newly opened Baltimore City College building at 33rd and The Alameda that sounded like fun. The Evening Sun (along with the Playground Athletic League)
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 19, 1992
From The Sun July 19-25, 1842JULY 20: John Lemmon was yesterday committed by Justice Barnard for stealing ham and potatoes from his father.JULY 23: New Cure for Blindness -- Blindness is now cured in England by administering prussic acid. It was suggested by observing that people who had died from the effects of this deadly poison had an unnatural brightness in their eyes for some time afterwards.From The Sun July 19-25, 1892JULY 19: Fully 5,000 colored persons from Baltimore and Washington attended the annual picnic of the Irving Park Camp-Meeting Association, near Annapolis Junction, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad yesterday.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 1998
Larry Adler is one of those peculiar, almost impossible-to-classify figures who crop up in the music world every few decades or so.The Baltimore-born Adler, 84, ranks among the important American musicians of this century. But his position -- at least in his native country -- has always been marginalized by two factors. They are his instrument, the lowly harmonica or mouth organ and his politically incorrect social views, which (in the late 1940s) led to his being placed on a blacklist that made it impossible for him to earn a living in the United States when he was at the height of his fame.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | November 23, 2003
A few months ago this column noted that a different caliber of leadership was alive, and mostly still active, in Israel when I first arrived there 30 years ago. David Ben-Gurion, Golda Meir, Moshe Dayan, Abba Eban and other titans in the founding of the modern Jewish state were present. But the man with whom I spent much more time was not a founder of the Jewish state. He would be the first to laugh about his name even being included with those heroes of Zion. His name was Freddie Weisgal.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 30, 1994
It's hard to say which is Larry Adler's greater talent -- playing harmonica or telling stories.Granted, his reputation on the mouth organ is formidable. It would be tempting to call him the Casals of his instrument, except that Adler's interests extend well beyond the classical repertoire. True, he has had pieces written for him by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Hector Villa-Lobos, Darius Milhaud and Malcolm Arnold. But the Baltimore-born musician has also recorded with everyone from Duke Ellington and Django Rheinhardt to Sonny Terry and Sting.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Bill Glauber and Carl Schoettler and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
Larry Adler was a tough little kid from Baltimore with a quick wit, a sharp tongue and an immense talent for playing the harmonica. When he died in London yesterday from cancer and "an accumulation of many things," according to his literary agent, Diana Tyler, Adler, 87, was still a brilliant, testy, raconteur and a nonpareil virtuoso of the harmonica. He had single-handedly made the lowly mouth organ into a serious concert hall instrument, and he remained the instrument's singular master.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 1998
Larry Adler is one of those peculiar, almost impossible-to-classify figures who crop up in the music world every few decades or so.The Baltimore-born Adler, 84, ranks among the important American musicians of this century. But his position -- at least in his native country -- has always been marginalized by two factors. They are his instrument, the lowly harmonica or mouth organ and his politically incorrect social views, which (in the late 1940s) led to his being placed on a blacklist that made it impossible for him to earn a living in the United States when he was at the height of his fame.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1998
The harmonica virtuoso Larry Adler was 15 years old and trying to get a job with the Paul Whiteman Orchestra in Manhattan when he met George Gershwin."
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 30, 1994
It's hard to say which is Larry Adler's greater talent -- playing harmonica or telling stories.Granted, his reputation on the mouth organ is formidable. It would be tempting to call him the Casals of his instrument, except that Adler's interests extend well beyond the classical repertoire. True, he has had pieces written for him by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Hector Villa-Lobos, Darius Milhaud and Malcolm Arnold. But the Baltimore-born musician has also recorded with everyone from Duke Ellington and Django Rheinhardt to Sonny Terry and Sting.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | September 21, 1993
WHAT might you have done for some entertainment on Saturday, June 2, 1928?You might have gone to the flower show at the Women's Civic League, 108 W. Mulberry St.There were a couple of forgettable movies, "Dragnet" at the Century, "Yellow Lily" at the Stanley. An equally forgettable play, "Women Go on Forever," was at Ford's. The pickings were fairly slim.But there was some activity over at the newly opened Baltimore City College building at 33rd and The Alameda that sounded like fun. The Evening Sun (along with the Playground Athletic League)
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | August 3, 1993
London -- He's a shameless name-dropper, an untiring braggart. But one thing he's not: He's not a phoney.The infuriating thing about Larry Adler, the Baltimore boy who made good in the great world and never lost his unaffection for his hometown, is that he is or was on intimate terms or was acquainted with all the people he mentions in his conversation, people like George Gershwin, Maurice Ravel, Ingrid Bergman, Luciano Pavarotti. Even Sting.You name it. If you don't, he will.And he's got good reason to boast.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | August 3, 1993
London -- He's a shameless name-dropper, an untiring braggart. But one thing he's not: He's not a phoney.The infuriating thing about Larry Adler, the Baltimore boy who made good in the great world and never lost his unaffection for his hometown, is that he is or was on intimate terms or was acquainted with all the people he mentions in his conversation, people like George Gershwin, Maurice Ravel, Ingrid Bergman, Luciano Pavarotti. Even Sting.You name it. If you don't, he will.And he's got good reason to boast.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | April 10, 1994
Part of May Garrettson Evans' legacy is the number of distinguished careers in the performing arts that started at the Peabody Prep. A very short list might include:* Dancer-choreographer Martha Clarke, a founder of Pilobolus and a recent recipient of a "genius grant" from the MacArthur Foundation.* Composer Philip Glass, whose minimalist operas, such as "Einstein on the Beach" and "Satyagraha," made him a media superstar and gave new life to a moribund genre.* Harmonica player Larry Adler, among the greatest virtuosos on his instrument, who was expelled from the Prep for playing "Yes, We Have No Bananas" in the early 1920s and went on to become, in the '30s and '40s, one of the highest-paid performers in the world.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 19, 1992
From The Sun July 19-25, 1842JULY 20: John Lemmon was yesterday committed by Justice Barnard for stealing ham and potatoes from his father.JULY 23: New Cure for Blindness -- Blindness is now cured in England by administering prussic acid. It was suggested by observing that people who had died from the effects of this deadly poison had an unnatural brightness in their eyes for some time afterwards.From The Sun July 19-25, 1892JULY 19: Fully 5,000 colored persons from Baltimore and Washington attended the annual picnic of the Irving Park Camp-Meeting Association, near Annapolis Junction, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad yesterday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.