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April 7, 1992
The announced attendance for yesterday's regular-season opener at Oriole Park at Camden Yards was 44,568, but that doesn't mean there were any tickets still available. The game really was a sellout and virtually all of the 48,041 available seats were filled. Under American League rules, only paid attendance is announced. The number was less than capacity because of the large number of complimentary tickets given to Opening Week sponsors and others involved in the completion of the park. There also were two sections used for an auxiliary press box.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Area hospitals are coping with a surge of patients with achy bodies, fevers and sore throats as the nation grapples with a flu season that has hit earlier and harder than usual. The flu virus is unpredictable, so no one knows when the outbreak will peak or how bad the season will be, but a doctor said the pieces are in place to potentially make it one of the worst influenza seasons in recent years. The principal strain infecting people this year is one generally associated with more severe symptoms, said Dr. Andrea Dugas, an emergency room physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital who is leading research on the flu virus.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 24, 1998
As if the Internal Revenue Service hasn't suffered enough embarrassment of late for overzealous collection practices and other abuses, the agency -- a stickler for accuracy on the part of taxpayers -- now admits that one of its figures is a whopping overestimate.Early in April, the IRS warned that more than 1 million taxpayers who should have included Schedule D, the form for reporting capital gains and losses, had failed to do so in their filings for 1997. These filers could expect the agency to send their return right back to them -- without any claimed refund.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Raquel Rojas has never worked for a company that gave her paid sick leave. Sometimes even unpaid leave isn't on offer. The Baltimore resident said a restaurant that employed her as a line cook three years ago stopped scheduling her for work after she stayed home for two weeks to recover from pneumonia. She said she had worked through worsening symptoms for several weeks — fever, mouth sores and eventually a bad cough — until she couldn't go on. "That happened to me, but also, not just to me," Rojas, 45, said through an interpreter.
NEWS
By Marlene David | May 31, 1994
OUR youngest son wants to teach. I suppose his choice shouldn't surprise me, since he comes from a family of teachers.He's grown up with tales of the classroom enlivening dinner discussions. He's seen the jammed briefcases and the Sunday afternoon journeys back to school to clear the desk, call an anxious parent or leave a congratulatory note as a start-of-week greeting.He's heard the phone calls to the student who's home with mono, and he's seen our living room filled with a class invited to dinner.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1991
If you think the shaky economy, layoffs and the flat job market are more than you can cope with, brace yourself for age-quake.Not exactly a household word yet, age-quake is a term that gerontologists use to describe the demographic change looming in the 21st century, when an increasingly larger proportion of the population is expected to survive to old age. Experts predict a dramatic impact on things such as health care, housing, social services, business, labor...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | January 30, 1997
More brazen criminals armed with powerful guns have changed the nature of crime in Baltimore, according to a study of why the homicide rate continues to rise despite a sharp decrease in the number of shootings.While city residents are less likely now than in the past two years to be hit by random gunfire, those who are wounded stand a far greater chance of dying before reaching a hospital.A team of experts examined thousands of shooting and hospital reports to determine why 16.7 percent of shooting victims died last year, compared with 11 percent in 1993.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
War Is BloodyEditor: War is not a game of Nintendo. It is a bloody mess full of horror. Despite heavy-handed attempts at propaganda and censorship by the military, the truth of this war will not long be hidden from the American people or even the world, by euphemisms or evasions.Quite a large number of Americans will die and be maimed in the dessert. Due to the superior efficiency and technology of our armed forces, a much larger number of Iraqis and others who get in the way will be killed and maimed, military or civilian, adults, women and children.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
A significant number of Baltimore teachers — in some schools as many as 60 percent of the staff — have received unsatisfactory ratings on their midyear evaluations as the system moves to implement a pay-for-performance contract that's considered a bellwether for a national movement. Teachers contend that the high number of "performance improvement plans," which can be a precursor for dismissal, is an attempt to avoid paying raises. But city school officials say that putting teachers on such plans is part of broader efforts to help them become more effective in the classroom.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
Area hospitals are coping with a surge of patients with achy bodies, fevers and sore throats as the nation grapples with a flu season that has hit earlier and harder than usual. The flu virus is unpredictable, so no one knows when the outbreak will peak or how bad the season will be, but a doctor said the pieces are in place to potentially make it one of the worst influenza seasons in recent years. The principal strain infecting people this year is one generally associated with more severe symptoms, said Dr. Andrea Dugas, an emergency room physician at Johns Hopkins Hospital who is leading research on the flu virus.
NEWS
By Jill Pardini | June 4, 2012
"Welcome to America. " It's a traditional greeting that implicitly embodies notions of acceptance, hope and opportunity. But that simple phrase can also be used as a taunt, as I witnessed during a youth soccer game in Baltimore where the teams were starkly divided by race, religion and language. "Welcome to America" served as a derisive cheer hurled across the field when the fairer-skinned team scored against a team made up of refugees and asylum seekers from Nepal, Bhutan, Iraq, Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia, Eritrea, Tanzania and Guinea.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
A significant number of Baltimore teachers — in some schools as many as 60 percent of the staff — have received unsatisfactory ratings on their midyear evaluations as the system moves to implement a pay-for-performance contract that's considered a bellwether for a national movement. Teachers contend that the high number of "performance improvement plans," which can be a precursor for dismissal, is an attempt to avoid paying raises. But city school officials say that putting teachers on such plans is part of broader efforts to help them become more effective in the classroom.
NEWS
By Stephen J.K. Walters | January 30, 2012
OK, Madame Mayor: Count us in. You've pledged to increase Baltimore's population by 10,000 households over the next decade. My wife and I have just bought a charming city condo, and we're happy to put you one step closer to your goal. You should be happy, too, because we're in a key demographic. We're DILKs: dual income, launched kids. Because Maryland jurisdictions collect piggy-back income taxes on the basis of residential location rather than where wages are earned, our relocation decision carries a nice fiscal dividend.
NEWS
By Jo Anne Schneider | October 19, 2011
Unemployment in this recession could have long-term ripple effects because many more of the long-term unemployed are educated, middle age and middle class. Retirement systems will face the consequences of lower contributions and early retirements. Parents are having trouble funding college as they lose income. Those previously with stable credit can't pay mortgages and other obligations. The presence of so many older, educated people among the ranks of the unemployed requires a nuanced policy response.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and David Zurawik and Jill Rosen and David Zurawik and,jill.rosen@baltsun.com and david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 15, 2008
Bishop Douglas I. Miles has lately been preaching a little something extra to his congregants at Koinonia Baptist Church in Northeast Baltimore - the gospel of tuning in to the presidential debates. His congregation listened - as did many others in the Baltimore area, where ratings collectively were the highest in the country for the first two presidential debates and the vice presidential debate. The third presidential debate between Democratic Sen. Barack Obama and Republican Sen. John McCain airs at 9 o'clock tonight from Hofstra University on Long Island, N.Y. "Parents and grandparents want their children and grandchildren to be witness to this historic event in the lives of the African-American community and America," Miles said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 6, 2008
NEW YORK -- At a recent performance of the all-black Broadway production of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Ramona Scott, 52, ran into a couple she'd worked for as a baby sitter almost 40 years ago. She saw another couple who had been friends of hers during the 1970s. Cat, which will be at the Broadhurst Theatre through June 15, was where everybody seemed to be. "A lot of my friends and family don't go out to plays," said Scott, a frequent theatergoer herself. "But when they hear of one that has a large black audience, they want to go and see it."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 6, 2008
NEW YORK -- At a recent performance of the all-black Broadway production of Tennessee Williams' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Ramona Scott, 52, ran into a couple she'd worked for as a baby sitter almost 40 years ago. She saw another couple who had been friends of hers during the 1970s. Cat, which will be at the Broadhurst Theatre through June 15, was where everybody seemed to be. "A lot of my friends and family don't go out to plays," said Scott, a frequent theatergoer herself. "But when they hear of one that has a large black audience, they want to go and see it."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
The perception within the black community that African-American students are targeted for suspension "needs to put clearly on the table," a community leader told the Howard County school board yesterday.A disproportionate number of black students appeared to be targets for suspension during the 1993-1994 school year, and "that makes for a negative reaction within the black community," said Natalie Woodson, educational chairwoman of the Howard County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
SPORTS
April 10, 2006
One of the real joys of watching a game between the Orioles and Boston Red Sox at Camden Yards is listening to the boorish Sox fans sitting right in front of the press box. Never mind how they always get a big group of prime seats right behind home plate on the field level - they must know how to use the Orioles' Web site better than you do - but wouldn't you think if you were going to drive this far to watch a ballgame you might bring along the rest...
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
Baltimore police officers have drastically increased their enforcement of so-called "quality of life" crimes during their first year and a half under Commissioner Kevin P. Clark, issuing a record number of citations and boosting the number of arrests. "We look at all illegal behavior and attack it in any way we can," Clark says. But the more people police send through the front door of the criminal justice system, the more cases prosecutors are tossing out. Since Clark took the helm, prosecutors are dismissing far more than half of all criminal citations, a marked increase.
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