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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 9, 1991
Ruth Laredo's piano recital last night in Shriver Hall offered some of the most highly colored music ever written for her instrument: three mazurkas by Chopin, a Scriabin group that included the orgasmic Ninth Sonata (the so-called "Black Mass"), and Iberian music by Albeniz and de Falla. The only classical work was Beethoven's Sonata No. 23 ("Appassionata"), one of the most torrid pieces in the repertory.Unfortunately, the prerequisite for such a program is coloristic imagination and ability.
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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
— The three soldiers in the Maryland National Guard helicopter crew lifted off from this sweltering border city shortly after sunset, with a federal agent on board and three "tickets" — reports of persons attempting to slip across the Rio Grande from Mexico into the United States. They spent an hour sweeping the river with infrared and night vision, but saw only Border Patrol agents, in their white SUVs or on foot, along the northern bank of the shallow river that separates the two countries.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
A former physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center was found dead Sunday in her Laredo, Texas, swimming pool, a death that police are investigating as a possible homicide. Dr. Marissa Christine Keene, 40, who worked as a staff physician at the Towson hospital from 2000 to 2006, drowned, police said. Joe Baeza, a spokesman for the Laredo Police Department, said yesterday the death has not been officially ruled a homicide, but that investigators are continuing to examine her residence and backyard.
NEWS
July 10, 2007
On June 3, 2007, DR. MARISSA CHRISTINE KEENE, 40, of Laredo TX, formerly of Ruxton and Roland Park, MD, died at her home in Laredo. Dr. Keene worked as an obstetrician/gynecologist at GBMC in Towson from 2000-2006. Her son Devon deFilippi attended Friends School of Baltimore, and her daughters Alicia and Mia deFilippi attended Immaculate Heart of Mary School in Baltimore. Dr. Keene was active in local athletics, including a softball league hosted by Towson University and a basketball league hosted by Immaculate Heart of Mary School.
NEWS
July 10, 2007
On June 3, 2007, DR. MARISSA CHRISTINE KEENE, 40, of Laredo TX, formerly of Ruxton and Roland Park, MD, died at her home in Laredo. Dr. Keene worked as an obstetrician/gynecologist at GBMC in Towson from 2000-2006. Her son Devon deFilippi attended Friends School of Baltimore, and her daughters Alicia and Mia deFilippi attended Immaculate Heart of Mary School in Baltimore. Dr. Keene was active in local athletics, including a softball league hosted by Towson University and a basketball league hosted by Immaculate Heart of Mary School.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 15, 1995
All of Mozart's masterpieces for piano and orchestra are difficult to play, but his final work in the genre, Concerto No. 27 in B-flat (K. 595), belongs in a special category. This is a piece that -- if it's 5l not to become boring or to suggest Mozartean self-parody -- must take the listener to ethereal heights.Joseph Kalichstein's performance of K. 595 with the Baltimore Symphony and conductor Jaime Laredo Thursday night in Meyerhoff Hall, in the first of the orchestra's Summerfest concerts, was good enough occasionally to suggest that one was listening to major Mozart.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 17, 1995
With a heat index of 125 outside, the air conditioning offered by Meyerhoff Hall Saturday night was at least as pleasing as the all-Mozart program of the Baltimore Symphony in the second of its Summerfest concerts.Nevertheless, the Mozart was very good indeed, particularly the performance of the Double Piano Concerto in E-Flat (K. 365) with the pianists Claude Frank and Lillian Kallir that concluded the program. Though married to each other, Frank and Kallir have always led separate careers as soloists and their approach to the keyboard -- Frank's more thoughtful, Kallir's more brilliant -- is quite different.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
— The three soldiers in the Maryland National Guard helicopter crew lifted off from this sweltering border city shortly after sunset, with a federal agent on board and three "tickets" — reports of persons attempting to slip across the Rio Grande from Mexico into the United States. They spent an hour sweeping the river with infrared and night vision, but saw only Border Patrol agents, in their white SUVs or on foot, along the northern bank of the shallow river that separates the two countries.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2001
LAREDO, Texas - From battered flatbed pickups to state-of-the-art tractor-trailers, the lines of trucks waiting to cross the grandly but aptly named U.S.-Mexico World Trade Bridge stretch as far as the eye can see. Watching this booming commerce cross the turbid Rio Grande makes Rafael Garcia almost breathless. From where he sits, the two countries have virtually melded to one. "People from up north think the river is where the U.S. ends and Mexico begins. In fact, it's where the U.S. blends into Mexico," said Garcia, the bridge director, who was born and raised in Laredo.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Contributing Writer | January 3, 1993
A 52-year-old Taneytown resident's humanitarian odyssey to Cuba in late November actually had its origins years before.For Jim Small, the owner of Taneytown Auto Parts Inc. and Small & Sons Auto Parts in Emmitsburg, humanitarian activism began when he was serving in the Army in Europe in the late 1950s."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
A former physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center was found dead Sunday in her Laredo, Texas, swimming pool, a death that police are investigating as a possible homicide. Dr. Marissa Christine Keene, 40, who worked as a staff physician at the Towson hospital from 2000 to 2006, drowned, police said. Joe Baeza, a spokesman for the Laredo Police Department, said yesterday the death has not been officially ruled a homicide, but that investigators are continuing to examine her residence and backyard.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 2001
Ruth Laredo, one of this country's most distinguished and versatile pianists, will be in Annapolis this weekend to take part in the final concerts of this year's Heifetz Institute summer music festival. At 7:30 p.m. Friday, Laredo will take center stage at St. John's College's Great Hall for a recital of solo works by Rachmaninoff and Scriabin, after which she'll accompany Daniel Heifetz, the institute's founding father, in the brooding, passionate A minor Violin Sonata of Cesar Franck.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 15, 2001
LAREDO, Texas - From battered flatbed pickups to state-of-the-art tractor-trailers, the lines of trucks waiting to cross the grandly but aptly named U.S.-Mexico World Trade Bridge stretch as far as the eye can see. Watching this booming commerce cross the turbid Rio Grande makes Rafael Garcia almost breathless. From where he sits, the two countries have virtually melded to one. "People from up north think the river is where the U.S. ends and Mexico begins. In fact, it's where the U.S. blends into Mexico," said Garcia, the bridge director, who was born and raised in Laredo.
FEATURES
By Daniel Schlosberg and Daniel Schlosberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 2000
Did Clara Schumann have an affair with Johannes Brahms? Acclaimed pianist Ruth Laredo thinks she knows the answer, although other experts vigorously disagree. "They had a torrid love affair," Laredo said. "There's no way they couldn't have." It's one of the topics she'll address in her "concert with commentary" Friday night at the University of Maryland, College Park. Laredo started giving this type of recital, which mixes performance with anecdotes about the composers' lives, at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1980.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 1999
It's easy to forget sometimes that most of our great works of instrumental music were written not for large orchestras, but for smaller groups of musicians performing in a more intimate setting.Indeed, these sonatas, trios, quartets, quintets, sextets, septets and octets of the chamber repertoire represent our greatest composers at the apex of their art, so it's hardly surprising that the most prestigious virtuosos have gravitated toward chamber music like moths to a flame.Jascha Heifetz, Pablo Casals, and Artur Rubinstein were champions of the chamber idiom in their day, and you'll often find such luminaries as Itzhak Perlman, Yo-Yo Ma and Vladimir Ashkenazy playing collegially in ours.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Two PBS documentaries, "Nova" and "Frontline," take a turn down criminal paths tonight, while two network miniseries, "The Invaders" and "Streets of Laredo," conclude on Fox and CBS.* "Nova: Hunt for the Serial Arsonist" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The science of crime-scene investigation is scrutinized through the solving of a 1991 rash of arson fires at Los Angeles stores. PBS.* "The Invaders" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In the original series (1967-68), Roy Thinnes never had much luck persuading people that aliens had invaded the Earth.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Two PBS documentaries, "Nova" and "Frontline," take a turn down criminal paths tonight, while two network miniseries, "The Invaders" and "Streets of Laredo," conclude on Fox and CBS.* "Nova: Hunt for the Serial Arsonist" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The science of crime-scene investigation is scrutinized through the solving of a 1991 rash of arson fires at Los Angeles stores. PBS.* "The Invaders" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In the original series (1967-68), Roy Thinnes never had much luck persuading people that aliens had invaded the Earth.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 11, 1995
"Streets of Laredo" is filled with king-sized characters, mythic frontier imagery, buckets of blood and more dead animals than I want to think about.The two-night, CBS mini-series is also loaded with talent both in front and behind the cameras.Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Larry McMurtry co-wrote the screenplay -- something he did only once before for one of his books, "The Last Picture Show." James Garner and Sissy Spacek deliver the kind of exquisitely understated performances that make you believe in and care about their characters immediately and, possibly, forever.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 11, 1995
"Streets of Laredo" is filled with king-sized characters, mythic frontier imagery, buckets of blood and more dead animals than I want to think about.The two-night, CBS mini-series is also loaded with talent both in front and behind the cameras.Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Larry McMurtry co-wrote the screenplay -- something he did only once before for one of his books, "The Last Picture Show." James Garner and Sissy Spacek deliver the kind of exquisitely understated performances that make you believe in and care about their characters immediately and, possibly, forever.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 17, 1995
With a heat index of 125 outside, the air conditioning offered by Meyerhoff Hall Saturday night was at least as pleasing as the all-Mozart program of the Baltimore Symphony in the second of its Summerfest concerts.Nevertheless, the Mozart was very good indeed, particularly the performance of the Double Piano Concerto in E-Flat (K. 365) with the pianists Claude Frank and Lillian Kallir that concluded the program. Though married to each other, Frank and Kallir have always led separate careers as soloists and their approach to the keyboard -- Frank's more thoughtful, Kallir's more brilliant -- is quite different.
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