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By Mike Giuliano | December 7, 2011
When "The Laramie Project" was first staged in 2000, it was a joltingly topical theatrical treatment of a notorious recent hate crime. Sad to say, Moises Kaufman's play remains topical, as we're reminded by the confident student revival at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. This docu-drama has its basis in the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old gay student at the University of Wyoming. Responding to this brutal crime with journalistic speed, the playwright and members of the Tectonic Theatre Project interviewed an assortment of people.
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By Mike Giuliano | December 7, 2011
When "The Laramie Project" was first staged in 2000, it was a joltingly topical theatrical treatment of a notorious recent hate crime. Sad to say, Moises Kaufman's play remains topical, as we're reminded by the confident student revival at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. This docu-drama has its basis in the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old gay student at the University of Wyoming. Responding to this brutal crime with journalistic speed, the playwright and members of the Tectonic Theatre Project interviewed an assortment of people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
The Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre presents The Laramie Project, a multilayered tale of hate in modern America. The play, an intricate chronicle of a town's reaction to the well-publicized 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, will open with an 8 p.m. performance tomorrow. The dramatic production offers more than thematic complexity, however. It's technically complicated as well, requiring the play's 14 cast members to portray more than 60 residents of the small Wyoming town. Assistant director Shannon Maddox said much of the play's dialogue is taken directly from the playwright's interviews with townspeople.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 27, 2005
Textile exhibit They are functional objects, often seen as beautiful artistic works. Textile containers have been used in many ways in various cultures. Tomorrow through June 5, the Textile Museum in Washington is presenting Beyond the Bag: Textiles as Containers, an exhibit exploring the ways cultures have used textile containers. Items include the tzut, a Guatemalan textile container that can be tied in several ways to provide storage or can serve as a baby carrier when worn over the shoulders.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 9, 2002
There are two major television movies related to the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard airing in the next week. HBO has The Laramie Project tonight, while NBC offers The Matthew Shepard Story next Saturday. Of the two, tonight's Laramie Project is the one you don't want to miss - though it is not really about Shepard, the 21-year-old college student who was brutally murdered by two young men who hated him because he was gay. As the title suggests, HBO's film is about Laramie, Wyo., specifically its culture and community following an attack that shocked the nation.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 28, 2002
NEW YORK - Moises Kaufman is a born outsider. The son of Eastern European Holocaust survivors, he was raised as an Orthodox Jew in deeply Catholic Venezuela and had nowhere to turn in that macho society when he began to realize, at age 9, that he was homosexual. Eventually he turned to the theater, and today the 38-year-old critically acclaimed director and playwright is credited with two of the most widely produced plays in American regional theater - Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde and The Laramie Project.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | August 24, 2002
Oscar Wilde once wrote: "The truth is rarely pure and never simple." The same could be said of The Laramie Project, the play that is sparking the latest salvo in the culture wars. Conservative Christian leaders have said they might file a lawsuit against the University of Maryland in an attempt to block the distribution of 10,000 copies of the play to all freshmen and to other students living on the College Park campus. This fall, students will stage a production of the play, and Moises Kaufman, the work's primary author, is scheduled to visit the campus.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | July 30, 2002
The gleaming amber backdrop for the Olney Theatre Center's production of The Laramie Project is as vast as the Wyoming sky. Sometimes, it's a mirror in which the audience is reflected as it ponders the brutal slaying of 21-year-old Matthew Shepard because he was gay. Sometimes, it's a screen on which images are projected of a sheriff's badge, or the fence to which the dying young man was tied. Sometimes, it's a sheer curtain behind which the actors sit while they look out at us. We are both the observers and the observed - just like the people of Laramie, Wyo. The Laramie Project is a piece of theatrical journalism that was created after Shepard, a student at the University of Wyoming, was robbed, pistol-whipped and tied to a fence in an isolated area as temperatures plunged into the 30s. When he was discovered 18 hours later, there were only two clean streaks on his blood-soaked face - streaks caused by his tears.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 27, 2005
Textile exhibit They are functional objects, often seen as beautiful artistic works. Textile containers have been used in many ways in various cultures. Tomorrow through June 5, the Textile Museum in Washington is presenting Beyond the Bag: Textiles as Containers, an exhibit exploring the ways cultures have used textile containers. Items include the tzut, a Guatemalan textile container that can be tied in several ways to provide storage or can serve as a baby carrier when worn over the shoulders.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 16, 2002
I would probably like NBC's The Matthew Shepard Story a lot more if HBO's The Laramie Project hadn't run just last week. There's nothing terribly wrong with NBC's telling of this story about a college student beaten to death by two young men who hated him because he was gay. It's a quality production with outstanding direction by Roger Spottiswoode (And the Band Played On ... ), and lead performances from Stockard Channing and Sam Waterston that are every bit as compelling as could be expected from their weekly work in, respectively, The West Wing and Law & Order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
The Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre presents The Laramie Project, a multilayered tale of hate in modern America. The play, an intricate chronicle of a town's reaction to the well-publicized 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard, will open with an 8 p.m. performance tomorrow. The dramatic production offers more than thematic complexity, however. It's technically complicated as well, requiring the play's 14 cast members to portray more than 60 residents of the small Wyoming town. Assistant director Shannon Maddox said much of the play's dialogue is taken directly from the playwright's interviews with townspeople.
NEWS
September 2, 2002
UM readings foster discourse on differences As a student, it is with great pain and disgust that I read of the American Family Association's intent to sue the University of Maryland for distributing free copies of Moises Kaufman's play, The Laramie Project ("UM draws fire for requiring reading of play on gay man," Aug. 23). Stephen M. Crampton, counsel for the conservative group, claims the play is "attempting to impose an orthodoxy of belief in favor of homosexuality." Mr. Crampton is attempting to stifle debate on an issue prevalent on college campuses.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 28, 2002
NEW YORK - Moises Kaufman is a born outsider. The son of Eastern European Holocaust survivors, he was raised as an Orthodox Jew in deeply Catholic Venezuela and had nowhere to turn in that macho society when he began to realize, at age 9, that he was homosexual. Eventually he turned to the theater, and today the 38-year-old critically acclaimed director and playwright is credited with two of the most widely produced plays in American regional theater - Gross Indecency: The Three Trials of Oscar Wilde and The Laramie Project.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | August 24, 2002
Oscar Wilde once wrote: "The truth is rarely pure and never simple." The same could be said of The Laramie Project, the play that is sparking the latest salvo in the culture wars. Conservative Christian leaders have said they might file a lawsuit against the University of Maryland in an attempt to block the distribution of 10,000 copies of the play to all freshmen and to other students living on the College Park campus. This fall, students will stage a production of the play, and Moises Kaufman, the work's primary author, is scheduled to visit the campus.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
The University of North Carolina and University of Maryland might have picked different books for their campuswide reading programs, but they are running into similar opposition - including the threat of court challenges. Maryland's flagship public university has ordered 10,000 copies of The Laramie Project, a play about the killing of gay college student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., in 1998, to distribute next week to all freshmen and all other students living on the College Park campus.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | July 30, 2002
The gleaming amber backdrop for the Olney Theatre Center's production of The Laramie Project is as vast as the Wyoming sky. Sometimes, it's a mirror in which the audience is reflected as it ponders the brutal slaying of 21-year-old Matthew Shepard because he was gay. Sometimes, it's a screen on which images are projected of a sheriff's badge, or the fence to which the dying young man was tied. Sometimes, it's a sheer curtain behind which the actors sit while they look out at us. We are both the observers and the observed - just like the people of Laramie, Wyo. The Laramie Project is a piece of theatrical journalism that was created after Shepard, a student at the University of Wyoming, was robbed, pistol-whipped and tied to a fence in an isolated area as temperatures plunged into the 30s. When he was discovered 18 hours later, there were only two clean streaks on his blood-soaked face - streaks caused by his tears.
NEWS
September 2, 2002
UM readings foster discourse on differences As a student, it is with great pain and disgust that I read of the American Family Association's intent to sue the University of Maryland for distributing free copies of Moises Kaufman's play, The Laramie Project ("UM draws fire for requiring reading of play on gay man," Aug. 23). Stephen M. Crampton, counsel for the conservative group, claims the play is "attempting to impose an orthodoxy of belief in favor of homosexuality." Mr. Crampton is attempting to stifle debate on an issue prevalent on college campuses.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
The University of North Carolina and University of Maryland might have picked different books for their campuswide reading programs, but they are running into similar opposition - including the threat of court challenges. Maryland's flagship public university has ordered 10,000 copies of The Laramie Project, a play about the killing of gay college student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyo., in 1998, to distribute next week to all freshmen and all other students living on the College Park campus.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 16, 2002
I would probably like NBC's The Matthew Shepard Story a lot more if HBO's The Laramie Project hadn't run just last week. There's nothing terribly wrong with NBC's telling of this story about a college student beaten to death by two young men who hated him because he was gay. It's a quality production with outstanding direction by Roger Spottiswoode (And the Band Played On ... ), and lead performances from Stockard Channing and Sam Waterston that are every bit as compelling as could be expected from their weekly work in, respectively, The West Wing and Law & Order.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 9, 2002
There are two major television movies related to the 1998 murder of Matthew Shepard airing in the next week. HBO has The Laramie Project tonight, while NBC offers The Matthew Shepard Story next Saturday. Of the two, tonight's Laramie Project is the one you don't want to miss - though it is not really about Shepard, the 21-year-old college student who was brutally murdered by two young men who hated him because he was gay. As the title suggests, HBO's film is about Laramie, Wyo., specifically its culture and community following an attack that shocked the nation.
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