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NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | January 7, 1993
TO: President-elect ClintonRe: the InauguralDear Bill,That sounds too informal, doesn't it? After all, I'm not an F.O.B. (Friend of Bill) and for a long time I wasn't even an S.O.B. (Supporter of Bill). But I am related by marriage to a C.O.B. (Contributor of Bill) and so I have come into possession of this lovely inaugural mailing.First off, thanks for the beautiful big engraved invitation. When we opened it we thought we were being invited to the wedding of the daughter of the Sultan of Bahrain.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
Baltimore's next police commissioner believes the drug trade is at the core of crime problems from car break-ins to gang killings. And it's an issue that Anthony W. Batts says he's seen up close. "I have relatives who have had addiction problems, and they didn't solve those problems until they got into treatment," he said, referring to family in the Baltimore area. "Trying to stem those issues will stem some of the property crime issues and some of the violence. I think it's all connected.
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NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | October 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The much ado about Sen. Barack Obama's decision not to wear an American flag lapel pin was, well, symbolic. To follow the debate that followed the headline that followed the nonstory about a dated decision is to witness where acute partisanship has led us. From the hue and cry on the right, you'd have thought the Illinois Democrat had flushed a Bible down the toilet. What Mr. Obama did might have escaped anyone's notice but for what he said when a reporter in Iowa recently asked him about the missing pin. In the Age of Public Virtue, it is apparently essential that citizens flaunt their patriotism - crucial if they're running for office.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | October 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The much ado about Sen. Barack Obama's decision not to wear an American flag lapel pin was, well, symbolic. To follow the debate that followed the headline that followed the nonstory about a dated decision is to witness where acute partisanship has led us. From the hue and cry on the right, you'd have thought the Illinois Democrat had flushed a Bible down the toilet. What Mr. Obama did might have escaped anyone's notice but for what he said when a reporter in Iowa recently asked him about the missing pin. In the Age of Public Virtue, it is apparently essential that citizens flaunt their patriotism - crucial if they're running for office.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1999
Every week, Frank Turban counsels and admonishes 200 people convicted of drunken driving.They parade into his Ellicott City office for short chats, updating Turban on their lives, jobs, spouses. Sometimes, one will notice the tell-tale Camel lapel pin on Turban's jacket. Soon, they are sharing a secret.Turban, a probation monitor for the state Drinking Driver Monitor Program, is a recovering alcoholic -- the pin symbolizes his 12-step program -- who uses his painful experiences to guide those he supervises.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1999
WASHINGTON - He is dressed in the crow-like uniform of late '90s hip: black sport coat over a black T-shirt, eyes peering through small black wire-rims.With his tangle of white hair and hollow voice, like a low, steady note of a flute, this lanky figure could pass for some aging poet or film director. But his small lapel pin - a flintlock on a pale blue field bordered by a wreath - tells of a different occupation.It is the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the "CIB" to veterans, the prized possession of the grunt who has been in the thick of the fighting.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
Baltimore's next police commissioner believes the drug trade is at the core of crime problems from car break-ins to gang killings. And it's an issue that Anthony W. Batts says he's seen up close. "I have relatives who have had addiction problems, and they didn't solve those problems until they got into treatment," he said, referring to family in the Baltimore area. "Trying to stem those issues will stem some of the property crime issues and some of the violence. I think it's all connected.
NEWS
By DONNA R. ENGLE and DONNA R. ENGLE,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
When a dignitary drops by or a City Council member retires or a longtime member of the local board of zoning appeals steps down, he or she usually can expect a token of appreciation.Some towns give pens; some give mugs or other souvenirs.Westminster has lapel pins bearing the city seal, commemorative coins and a plate showing Emerald Hill, the historic mansion that became City Hall. It also has, thanks to former City Council woman Rebecca A. Orenstein, "I Love Westminster" buttons.Manchester officials offer "our profound thanks," in the words of Mayor Elmer C. Lippy, and lapel pins depicting the centuries-old oak tree on York Street.
NEWS
December 6, 1994
AS THE population grows, the number of its successful people grows. As Marquis Who's Who in America, too, grows (two volumes, by now; $259 the set), the latest edition's shelf presence in crowded offices or libraries may have become less a matter of course.How then (supposing for the moment that you are indeed a Marquis biographee) are the people you care about to learn of, and be reminded of, your eminence? Some biographees just say it, of course; but boasting's so uncivilized.This question applies, naturally, to the full range of Marquis biographical dictionaries -- to anyone listed in Who's Who in the East (South and Southwest, Midwest, West)
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | September 1, 1991
A United Methodist church agency that wants to build a $5 million foster care complex near Fallston has stepped up efforts to win public support for the project prior to zoning hearings later this month.The agency, The Board of Child Care of the Baltimore Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church Inc., since Aug. 14 has mailed out letters to Fallston area residents asking for public support for the project at two upcoming zoning hearings. They've invited area residents to a community meeting that their board of child care will conductSept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1999
WASHINGTON - He is dressed in the crow-like uniform of late '90s hip: black sport coat over a black T-shirt, eyes peering through small black wire-rims.With his tangle of white hair and hollow voice, like a low, steady note of a flute, this lanky figure could pass for some aging poet or film director. But his small lapel pin - a flintlock on a pale blue field bordered by a wreath - tells of a different occupation.It is the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the "CIB" to veterans, the prized possession of the grunt who has been in the thick of the fighting.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1999
Every week, Frank Turban counsels and admonishes 200 people convicted of drunken driving.They parade into his Ellicott City office for short chats, updating Turban on their lives, jobs, spouses. Sometimes, one will notice the tell-tale Camel lapel pin on Turban's jacket. Soon, they are sharing a secret.Turban, a probation monitor for the state Drinking Driver Monitor Program, is a recovering alcoholic -- the pin symbolizes his 12-step program -- who uses his painful experiences to guide those he supervises.
NEWS
By DONNA R. ENGLE and DONNA R. ENGLE,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1995
When a dignitary drops by or a City Council member retires or a longtime member of the local board of zoning appeals steps down, he or she usually can expect a token of appreciation.Some towns give pens; some give mugs or other souvenirs.Westminster has lapel pins bearing the city seal, commemorative coins and a plate showing Emerald Hill, the historic mansion that became City Hall. It also has, thanks to former City Council woman Rebecca A. Orenstein, "I Love Westminster" buttons.Manchester officials offer "our profound thanks," in the words of Mayor Elmer C. Lippy, and lapel pins depicting the centuries-old oak tree on York Street.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | January 7, 1993
TO: President-elect ClintonRe: the InauguralDear Bill,That sounds too informal, doesn't it? After all, I'm not an F.O.B. (Friend of Bill) and for a long time I wasn't even an S.O.B. (Supporter of Bill). But I am related by marriage to a C.O.B. (Contributor of Bill) and so I have come into possession of this lovely inaugural mailing.First off, thanks for the beautiful big engraved invitation. When we opened it we thought we were being invited to the wedding of the daughter of the Sultan of Bahrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dallas Morning News | August 8, 1999
DALLAS -- If Pam Johnson has learned one thing over the last year, it's that some people hate happiness.During that time, the founder of the Secret Society of Happy People has been cursed on national television, received veiled telephone threats at home and participated in a very public dispute with columnist Ann Landers."
FEATURES
By Liz Stevens and Liz Stevens,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | December 4, 1998
If you're happy and you know it keep it to yourself, thanks. Happiness, it sometimes seems, has gone the way of Tab cola and Milli Vanilli, fading into oblivion. It's hip to be hopeless, stylish to be stressed and popular to be a pitiable sap spreading gloom and bad juju. Even Ann Landers seems to be toeing the "No one wants to hear about your good fortune" line. Maybe it's the Jerry Springer effect. Whatever it is, Pam Johnson is tired of it; she's not mad, mind you, because that would be a waste of mental energy.
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