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By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | October 3, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Law enforcement officials swiftly put in motion plans to handle disturbances if any develop in the wake of today's O.J. Simpson verdict.Los Angeles Police Department spokesman Eduardo Funes said the police would be prepared -- this time -- to handle any disturbances."The process failed in 1992 in the riots, and measures will be taken to make sure it doesn't happen again," Mr. Funes said."We are confident the LAPD will respond vigorously to any unrest, any unusual occurrences," he said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2013
The rise in fatal shootings that has claimed dozens of lives in Baltimore City since the beginning of the summer focused attention on the gang violence that police say is responsible for much of the killing. Competing gangs adhere to a rigid code: You kill one of ours, we'll kill one of yours. That's why the vicious cycle of shootings and retaliatory killings persists even when police flood troubled neighborhoods with foot patrols and extra officers on overtime. But Baltimore could learn from the progress police in Los Angeles have made recently toward reducing gang violence.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- The police corruption scandal is contributing to a malaise in Los Angeles, helping to raise questions about the city's health and image, devastating public impressions of the Los Angeles Police Department and fueling strong sentiment for the appointment of an independent commission to investigate the crisis. Those findings, culled from a new Los Angeles Times poll, suggest that the scandal has had a deep effect on Los Angeles' sense of itself, sowing doubts despite a strong economy and continuing reductions in crime.
NEWS
By Will Beall | May 2, 2007
I was in my dorm room at San Diego State University, listening to the Led Zeppelin cover of "When the Levee Breaks," when I first saw George Holliday's amateur video of the Rodney King incident on CNN. It looked like those grainy films of Selma, Ala., in 1965, and the brutality turned my stomach. They didn't really talk about Rodney King when I went through the Los Angeles Police Academy a few years later.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2000
LOS ANGELES - The City of Los Angeles and the U.S. Department of Justice agreed yesterday on the most comprehensive set of police reforms ever imposed on the Los Angeles Police Department, ending months of tense negotiation over a settlement that will chart the future of the city's long-embattled police department. Under the terms of the proposed consent decree, an outside monitor with broad powers to probe the LAPD's inner workings will be appointed by March 1. That person will be in place for five years with a $10 million-plus budget for staff and other expenses.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 5, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- In the four years since Los Angeles Police Department officers were captured on videotape beating Rodney King with their batons, use of the once-popular weapon has dropped sharply, LAPD use-of-force records obtained by the Los Angeles Daily News show.Baton use reached an eight-year low last year, figuring in just 41 arrests -- a 92 percent drop from 1990, when batons were used 501 times against suspects resisting arrest, according to Los Angeles Police Department figures.Officers are no longer relying on their batons in large part because of the department's adoption of pepper spray, a cayenne pepper-based agent that leaves most suspects temporarily blinded and gasping, LAPD officials say.Longtime critics of the LAPD such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California say that they welcome the evidence that officers are using batons less frequently.
NEWS
March 15, 1991
Los Angeles police officers viciously beating a speeder they pulled from his car is not simply a local story. Every television station in the nation (if not the world) has played the tape of this brutal event; millions have seen it. For another, police misbehavior of this sort occurs in so many communities so often that it is a phenomena demanding national attention and national solutions.Some say that such episodes in any city are an "aberration." That is how LAPD Police Chief Daryl Gates described the sickening incident.
NEWS
By Will Beall | May 2, 2007
I was in my dorm room at San Diego State University, listening to the Led Zeppelin cover of "When the Levee Breaks," when I first saw George Holliday's amateur video of the Rodney King incident on CNN. It looked like those grainy films of Selma, Ala., in 1965, and the brutality turned my stomach. They didn't really talk about Rodney King when I went through the Los Angeles Police Academy a few years later.
NEWS
October 12, 1994
Two trials are going on in Judge Lance Ito's courtroom in Los Angeles. One is "the people vs. O. J. Simpson," who is charged with a double murder. The other is "Simpson's lawyers vs. the Los Angeles Police Department," which is charged with bungling the investigation, not following proper procedures, violating Mr. Simpson's constitutional rights, leaking prejudicial information to the press and planting evidence against Mr. Simpson, motivated by racial bigotry.That...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 29, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- By age 59, most people are looking forward to retirement, to a time when they can reap the benefits of their life's work and reflect on the strange twists and turns along the way.But at 59, rookie police Officer Edward Olivares has caught a second wind and is looking forward to the strange twists and turns that lie ahead.On Sunday, he took the first step of his second career as the Los Angeles Police Department's oldest rookie ever."I found out that LAPD was hiring and that my age was not a barrier, and I said to myself, 'This is something that I can be proud of for the rest of my life,' " Officer Olivares said Sunday as he lifted weights before his first patrol shift.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 1, 2000
LOS ANGELES - The City of Los Angeles and the U.S. Department of Justice agreed yesterday on the most comprehensive set of police reforms ever imposed on the Los Angeles Police Department, ending months of tense negotiation over a settlement that will chart the future of the city's long-embattled police department. Under the terms of the proposed consent decree, an outside monitor with broad powers to probe the LAPD's inner workings will be appointed by March 1. That person will be in place for five years with a $10 million-plus budget for staff and other expenses.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- The police corruption scandal is contributing to a malaise in Los Angeles, helping to raise questions about the city's health and image, devastating public impressions of the Los Angeles Police Department and fueling strong sentiment for the appointment of an independent commission to investigate the crisis. Those findings, culled from a new Los Angeles Times poll, suggest that the scandal has had a deep effect on Los Angeles' sense of itself, sowing doubts despite a strong economy and continuing reductions in crime.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | October 3, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Law enforcement officials swiftly put in motion plans to handle disturbances if any develop in the wake of today's O.J. Simpson verdict.Los Angeles Police Department spokesman Eduardo Funes said the police would be prepared -- this time -- to handle any disturbances."The process failed in 1992 in the riots, and measures will be taken to make sure it doesn't happen again," Mr. Funes said."We are confident the LAPD will respond vigorously to any unrest, any unusual occurrences," he said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | March 5, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- In the four years since Los Angeles Police Department officers were captured on videotape beating Rodney King with their batons, use of the once-popular weapon has dropped sharply, LAPD use-of-force records obtained by the Los Angeles Daily News show.Baton use reached an eight-year low last year, figuring in just 41 arrests -- a 92 percent drop from 1990, when batons were used 501 times against suspects resisting arrest, according to Los Angeles Police Department figures.Officers are no longer relying on their batons in large part because of the department's adoption of pepper spray, a cayenne pepper-based agent that leaves most suspects temporarily blinded and gasping, LAPD officials say.Longtime critics of the LAPD such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California say that they welcome the evidence that officers are using batons less frequently.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 29, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- By age 59, most people are looking forward to retirement, to a time when they can reap the benefits of their life's work and reflect on the strange twists and turns along the way.But at 59, rookie police Officer Edward Olivares has caught a second wind and is looking forward to the strange twists and turns that lie ahead.On Sunday, he took the first step of his second career as the Los Angeles Police Department's oldest rookie ever."I found out that LAPD was hiring and that my age was not a barrier, and I said to myself, 'This is something that I can be proud of for the rest of my life,' " Officer Olivares said Sunday as he lifted weights before his first patrol shift.
NEWS
October 12, 1994
Two trials are going on in Judge Lance Ito's courtroom in Los Angeles. One is "the people vs. O. J. Simpson," who is charged with a double murder. The other is "Simpson's lawyers vs. the Los Angeles Police Department," which is charged with bungling the investigation, not following proper procedures, violating Mr. Simpson's constitutional rights, leaking prejudicial information to the press and planting evidence against Mr. Simpson, motivated by racial bigotry.That...
NEWS
July 21, 2013
The rise in fatal shootings that has claimed dozens of lives in Baltimore City since the beginning of the summer focused attention on the gang violence that police say is responsible for much of the killing. Competing gangs adhere to a rigid code: You kill one of ours, we'll kill one of yours. That's why the vicious cycle of shootings and retaliatory killings persists even when police flood troubled neighborhoods with foot patrols and extra officers on overtime. But Baltimore could learn from the progress police in Los Angeles have made recently toward reducing gang violence.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | March 16, 1997
Still grappling with life in an increasingly politically correct society, Los Angeles police said they will rename the "Paddy Wagon" program that offers free rides home for St. Patrick's Day tipplers.This year, tipsy celebrants can pile into the LAPD-sponsored "Party Wagon," renamed because of objections to the word "paddy.""We received calls from groups in the Irish community who said: 'That's really not a nice word,' " said LAPD Cmdr. Art Lopez."I guess evidently it's got a bad connotation in the Irish community.
NEWS
March 15, 1991
Los Angeles police officers viciously beating a speeder they pulled from his car is not simply a local story. Every television station in the nation (if not the world) has played the tape of this brutal event; millions have seen it. For another, police misbehavior of this sort occurs in so many communities so often that it is a phenomena demanding national attention and national solutions.Some say that such episodes in any city are an "aberration." That is how LAPD Police Chief Daryl Gates described the sickening incident.
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