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By Linda Roach Monroe and Linda Roach Monroe,Knight-Ridder News Service Staff writer Sandra Crockett contributed to this article | September 28, 1993
So you think that little video camera in your closet is a marvel of miniaturization? Imagine trying to stick it through your navel.In what has become common procedure, doctors are performing surgery by viewing their patients' innards through a skinny video tube -- a laparoscope -- and by poking long-handled scalpels through a few half-inch slits in the belly.Although the procedure is nothing new in gynecological surgery, it began getting popular for general surgery in 1989, says Dr. Mark A. Talamini, a Johns Hopkins University surgery professor.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
It looks like an expensive bracelet, but the contraption laced in titanium beads gets placed around the esophagus rather than the wrist. The LINX Reflux Management System is a new treatment for acid reflux, a digestive order that causes heartburn, nagging cough and other chronic symptoms in 10 million to 20 million U.S. patients. The condition occurs when a weak valve where the esophagus meets the stomach, known as a sphincter, won't close properly, allowing bile and acid to wash up. Some doctors say the device, approved by the FDA last year, shows promise as an alternative for patients who don't find relief from drugs that reduce acid in the stomach, but don't want to get major surgery.
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NEWS
By Pamela J. Gray and Pamela J. Gray,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2005
Two years ago, when 63-year-old John Lombardo took early retirement from his job as a maintenance engineer at Verizon, he expected to have some fun. "I thought that my wife and I could go where we wanted to go and do what we wanted to do. But so far, we haven't been very far from home," says the Towson resident. "In 40 years of working, I had seven days absence due to illness," he says. But soon after he retired, a blood test and subsequent biopsy revealed that Lombardo had prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. He scheduled surgery with Dr. Thomas Smyth, a urologist at St. Joseph Medical Center, for January.
NEWS
By Pamela J. Gray and Pamela J. Gray,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2005
Two years ago, when 63-year-old John Lombardo took early retirement from his job as a maintenance engineer at Verizon, he expected to have some fun. "I thought that my wife and I could go where we wanted to go and do what we wanted to do. But so far, we haven't been very far from home," says the Towson resident. "In 40 years of working, I had seven days absence due to illness," he says. But soon after he retired, a blood test and subsequent biopsy revealed that Lombardo had prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. He scheduled surgery with Dr. Thomas Smyth, a urologist at St. Joseph Medical Center, for January.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
First, there was HAL, the talking spaceship computer in the movie "2001." Now, there's AESOP 2000, the surgical computer robot at St. Joseph Medical Center.In its East Coast debut yesterday, AESOP (pronounced eesop) assisted Dr. W. Peter Geis in a hernia-repair operation at the Towson hospital, listening to and following the general surgeon's commands."AESOP, move right," Geis commanded."Bleep," AESOP dutifully responded, its plastic-covered mechanical arm moving to the right.AESOP, the latest technology in laparoscopic surgery, maneuvers and positions the laparoscope, an optical tube that gives a doctor a magnified view on a video monitor while he performs surgery -- all by simple voice commands.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2003
The patient was so obese - more than 700 pounds - that it took seven nurses to turn him over. Three nurses at the New England hospital went out on workers compensation after injuring their shoulders and backs trying to move him. Because it was so hard to turn him over, he developed bedsores that got so large "you could see his colon -- you could have put a basketball in there," recalls a nurse. For a CT scan, he had to be taken to a nearby aquarium. "Toileting," in the discreet phrase of medical professionals, became horrific.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Contributing Writer | February 3, 1991
Nancy Mitchell, a Glenelg Country School teacher, had her gallbladder removed in a new procedure last October and spent just one night atHoward County General Hospital."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
It looks like an expensive bracelet, but the contraption laced in titanium beads gets placed around the esophagus rather than the wrist. The LINX Reflux Management System is a new treatment for acid reflux, a digestive order that causes heartburn, nagging cough and other chronic symptoms in 10 million to 20 million U.S. patients. The condition occurs when a weak valve where the esophagus meets the stomach, known as a sphincter, won't close properly, allowing bile and acid to wash up. Some doctors say the device, approved by the FDA last year, shows promise as an alternative for patients who don't find relief from drugs that reduce acid in the stomach, but don't want to get major surgery.
FEATURES
September 13, 2007
Tanya Sharpe, Ph.D., has joined the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Social Work as an assistant professor. Sharpe has extensive research experience related to public health, violence prevention and diversity. She previously taught at Harvard School of Public Health and Boston College School of Social Work. Dr. Shanthi Marur has joined the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center's Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Program. Marur completed her residency in internal medicine at Wayne State University in Detroit.
HEALTH
December 21, 2009
Appendicitis refers to an acute inflammatory process involving the appendix, which is a small, worm-like appendage of the first part of the colon, writes Dr. Jason Roland, co-director of minimally invasive and laparoscopic surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital. Anyone with an appendix is at risk for developing it. Here's how to spot and treat the condition: •Appendicitis occurs when the single orifice leading into the appendix becomes clogged, either with stool (known as a fecalith)
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2003
The patient was so obese - more than 700 pounds - that it took seven nurses to turn him over. Three nurses at the New England hospital went out on workers compensation after injuring their shoulders and backs trying to move him. Because it was so hard to turn him over, he developed bedsores that got so large "you could see his colon -- you could have put a basketball in there," recalls a nurse. For a CT scan, he had to be taken to a nearby aquarium. "Toileting," in the discreet phrase of medical professionals, became horrific.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
First, there was HAL, the talking spaceship computer in the movie "2001." Now, there's AESOP 2000, the surgical computer robot at St. Joseph Medical Center.In its East Coast debut yesterday, AESOP (pronounced eesop) assisted Dr. W. Peter Geis in a hernia-repair operation at the Towson hospital, listening to and following the general surgeon's commands."AESOP, move right," Geis commanded."Bleep," AESOP dutifully responded, its plastic-covered mechanical arm moving to the right.AESOP, the latest technology in laparoscopic surgery, maneuvers and positions the laparoscope, an optical tube that gives a doctor a magnified view on a video monitor while he performs surgery -- all by simple voice commands.
FEATURES
By Linda Roach Monroe and Linda Roach Monroe,Knight-Ridder News Service Staff writer Sandra Crockett contributed to this article | September 28, 1993
So you think that little video camera in your closet is a marvel of miniaturization? Imagine trying to stick it through your navel.In what has become common procedure, doctors are performing surgery by viewing their patients' innards through a skinny video tube -- a laparoscope -- and by poking long-handled scalpels through a few half-inch slits in the belly.Although the procedure is nothing new in gynecological surgery, it began getting popular for general surgery in 1989, says Dr. Mark A. Talamini, a Johns Hopkins University surgery professor.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Contributing Writer | February 3, 1991
Nancy Mitchell, a Glenelg Country School teacher, had her gallbladder removed in a new procedure last October and spent just one night atHoward County General Hospital."
NEWS
February 19, 2006
Smoking cessation classes are planned The Harford County Health Department will hold a five-week series of free stop-smoking classes for county residents at the Health Department, 119 Hays St., Bel Air. Classes include developing a quit-smoking plan, learning stress management techniques and discussing relapse prevention. Nicotine patches and lozenges are available to participants who qualify. The five-week session will begin Feb. 28 with a Pre-Quitting Class from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Other classes are from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. March 7, 14, 21 and 28. Registration is required and the Pre-Quitting Class is mandatory for first-time participants.
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