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Language Barrier

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NEWS
April 4, 1994
During the immigration explosion of the 1980s, more than million natives of other nations came to America, according to the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. That was as many as in the previous 20 years and about 13 percent of all immigrants to the United States from 1820 to 1990.Maryland wasn't immune to this boom. Some 150,000 foreigners made new homes here through the '80s. Most of them, reflecting the trend elsewhere in the country, were Latin Americans and Asians who settled in metropolitan areas.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
With just $40 in his pocket and the killing of two friends fresh in his mind, 13-year-old Leonardo Enrique Navas set off from El Salvador in July and traveled alone for 15 days on buses and taxis until he crossed the border into Texas. Every few days, he said, he called his mother in Maryland. That was the first part of his American journey. When school opens Tuesday, he will have his first day in a U.S. seventh-grade classroom, at Bates Middle School in Annapolis, after being reunited with a mother he had not seen for seven years.
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NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | August 20, 1991
Annapolis and county officials have pooled resources to help the county's Spanish-speaking residents cope with the language barrier.The joint effort will begin Wednesday night, when city and county officials conduct a forum in Spanish at the Mount Olive AME Church in Annapolis to hear concerns of Hispanic residents and to tell them about free services."
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | July 12, 2014
If you are signed up for the WWE text alerts, you may have been woken up at 7 a.m. Saturday by a text announcing that Japanese wrestling star KENTA had signed with the WWE. For those who are unfamiliar with KENTA (Kenta Kobayashi, not to be confused with his mentor, Kenta Kobashi) he is one of Japan's biggest stars, and has influenced many of today's wrestlers. His hybrid wrestling/mixed martial arts style has rubbed off on many. Merging kickboxing and wrestling, he is known for being one of the best strikers in wrestling today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
Sometimes, eating at a restaurant is all about the adventure. You can try a dish you've never had before, and maybe even come home with a story to share with friends. At Mat Jip in Charles Village , you might just find both. Mat Jip, which means "Taste House" in Korean, has taken over the space once filled by Famous Yakitori One. A small restaurant to begin with, it has none of the previous tenant's hipster panache. The place is seriously stripped down: A few sheets of paper with house specialties are taped to the stark white walls, and blinds hang from the ceiling, in between tables, to help sequester diners.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2004
In a downstairs room of the Linden-Linthicum United Methodist Church in Clarksville, several Korean-American pupils with limited English skills are being tutored by volunteers. "Afford - to be able to pay for; to be able to do," said Andy Shin, 11, reading from a vocabulary book. His tutor, Nina Zhang, immediately followed with a sentence to help the fifth-grader at St. John's Elementary School in Ellicott City understand how to use the word. "If you have enough money, you can afford the ice cream," she said.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 26, 2006
A language barrier is part of the plot of The Light in the Piazza, the musical based on Elizabeth Spencer's novella about a non-Italian-speaking American mother and her grown daughter traveling in Italy in the 1950s. But - at the risk of sounding cliched - music, light and love transcend that barrier in this resplendent musical. At the height of emotion, for example, composer/lyricist Adam Guettel has given the young lovers' a romantic duet, Say It Somehow, that consists mostly of wordless "ah's."
NEWS
By Chris Burritt and Chris Burritt,COX NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2001
DURHAM, N.C. - "Name a food you have never eaten," instructor Dawn Morgenstern said slowly to the three Mexican women, all learning to speak English. Even more slowly, 29-year-old Angelica Cortes replied, "I have never eaten ..." "Think of something. A bat?" the teacher said, flapping her hands as if she were one of the furry creatures. "I have never eaten a bat," Cortes said, haltingly, laughing at the thought. "I haven't either," the teacher said. The language barrier is falling, word by word, here at El Centro Hispano.
SPORTS
By George Diaz, Tribune Newspapers | February 2, 2011
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Carl Edwards had his eyes wide open during the short NASCAR offseason, thinking that a trip to Vietnam would be a "great escape" from the everyday grind of living in the U.S. And it was, in some ways. There was some fun stuff like trying to navigate traffic through a crazy-busy intersection while riding a bike. Edwards posted the video on Facebook. But the images in his head are the most vivid. The trip left Edwards with a sobering perspective on history, war and the awful scars it leaves behind.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Dominican slugger Nelson Cruz sat at his new locker a few weeks ago and surveyed the Orioles' spring training clubhouse. In one corner, Taiwanese pitcher Wei-Yin Chen was huddled with his interpreter. On the other side of the room, South Korean star Suk-min Yoon was playing pingpong. Right beside Cruz was Cuban outfielder Henry Urrutia, soaking in the experience of a marquee Latin American player who has not forgotten what it was like to be a stranger in a strange new land.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
Sometimes, eating at a restaurant is all about the adventure. You can try a dish you've never had before, and maybe even come home with a story to share with friends. At Mat Jip in Charles Village , you might just find both. Mat Jip, which means "Taste House" in Korean, has taken over the space once filled by Famous Yakitori One. A small restaurant to begin with, it has none of the previous tenant's hipster panache. The place is seriously stripped down: A few sheets of paper with house specialties are taped to the stark white walls, and blinds hang from the ceiling, in between tables, to help sequester diners.
SPORTS
By George Diaz, Tribune Newspapers | February 2, 2011
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Carl Edwards had his eyes wide open during the short NASCAR offseason, thinking that a trip to Vietnam would be a "great escape" from the everyday grind of living in the U.S. And it was, in some ways. There was some fun stuff like trying to navigate traffic through a crazy-busy intersection while riding a bike. Edwards posted the video on Facebook. But the images in his head are the most vivid. The trip left Edwards with a sobering perspective on history, war and the awful scars it leaves behind.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
Maryland's courts sometimes fail to properly serve those with limited-English skills, according to legal advocates and public officials, despite federal laws requiring them to do so and a national push to ensure equal access to the country's courts. About two months ago, Flor Giusti, head of a local group that helps Latino women who are the victims of domestic violence, accompanied a woman to a Baltimore County court to extend a temporary protection order against her partner. Lacking a Spanish interpreter that day, the judge asked the woman questions directly.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | June 10, 2007
A lot of people who read or heard about Gary Sheffield's comments regarding Latino players in this month's GQ magazine say Sheffield is wrong. He is wrong, they say, on the idea that the increase in Latino baseball players and the decrease in African-Americans is about "being able to tell [Latinos] what to do. ... Being able to control them." Marcos Breton, who literally wrote the book on the rise of Latinos in today's game, doesn't necessarily think Sheffield is wrong. His reasoning? "Two thousand dollars," he said.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | February 19, 2007
ATLANTA -- Profiles in political courage are rare, indeed, but there's an early contender for the awards Caroline Kennedy hands out every May: Bill Purcell, mayor of Nashville, Tenn. This month, defying the xenophobes, know-nothings and nativists, Mr. Purcell vetoed a local ordinance that would have enshrined "English-only" as official city policy and dictated that virtually all government communications be in English. "This ordinance does not reflect who we are in Nashville," the mayor said at a press conference.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to The Sun | February 4, 2007
Two pairs of Anne Arundel County middle schools are planning to combine classes for students learning English to meet the needs of a growing population of immigrants. In what school officials are calling the county's first "clusters" for students in the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) program, Marley Middle students in Glen Burnie could be bused across town to Corkran Middle as early as this fall to take the classes together. Fort Meade's MacArthur Middle School would take in students from nearby Meade Middle School.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | December 26, 2006
A language barrier is part of the plot of The Light in the Piazza, the musical based on Elizabeth Spencer's novella about a non-Italian-speaking American mother and her grown daughter traveling in Italy in the 1950s. But - at the risk of sounding cliched - music, light and love transcend that barrier in this resplendent musical. At the height of emotion, for example, composer/lyricist Adam Guettel has given the young lovers' a romantic duet, Say It Somehow, that consists mostly of wordless "ah's."
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