Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLane Stadium
IN THE NEWS

Lane Stadium

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2007
The sarcasm oozing from Boston College coach Jeff Jagodzinski on yesterday's Atlantic Coast Conference teleconference indicated he is unfazed by the atmosphere at Virginia Tech's Lane Stadium and tired of answering questions about playing a night game there. (The Hokies are 42-27-1 in night games under coach Frank Beamer.) "They've got lights there, right?" Jagodzinski asked Duane Rankin of the Erie Times-News. Rankin: "Right." "OK. So we should be OK for playing at night. Everyone is bringing up the `Lane Stadium at night'; I was hoping Virginia Tech had lights so we could play."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Maryland football coach Randy Edsall always talks about the process, how building a program is more than just wins and losses. At times, Edsall's mantra has been overshadowed by long losing streaks for his team and bouts of frustration among the fan base. Staying true to what he believes, Edsall said that winning a game such as his Terps did Saturday at Virginia Tech is really no different for him than others he has enjoyed during what has been a tumultuous and, at times, torturous, three seasons.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
BLACKSBURG, Va. - Not since Maryland beat West Virginia at M&T Bank Stadium to start the season 4-0 had senior quarterback C.J. Brown felt as good as he did last week. The concussion Brown sustained at Florida State in early October was the first major setback. It was followed by a string of blows Brown took elsewhere that seemed to slow him down both physically and mentally. But at Lane Stadium, against heavily favored Virginia Tech, Brown finally delivered his own knockout punch Saturday.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
BLACKSBURG, Va. - Not since Maryland beat West Virginia at M&T Bank Stadium to start the season 4-0 had senior quarterback C.J. Brown felt as good as he did last week. The concussion Brown sustained at Florida State in early October was the first major setback. It was followed by a string of blows Brown took elsewhere that seemed to slow him down both physically and mentally. But at Lane Stadium, against heavily favored Virginia Tech, Brown finally delivered his own knockout punch Saturday.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Maryland football coach Randy Edsall always talks about the process, how building a program is more than just wins and losses. At times, Edsall's mantra has been overshadowed by long losing streaks for his team and bouts of frustration among the fan base. Staying true to what he believes, Edsall said that winning a game such as his Terps did Saturday at Virginia Tech is really no different for him than others he has enjoyed during what has been a tumultuous and, at times, torturous, three seasons.
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
If they build it, will you bowl?That's the $30 million question that the city of Reno, Nev., has answered with a definite yes. Groundbreaking on the National Bowling Stadium -- the first bowling stadium in the world -- takes place Jan. 25.The 80-lane facility, which will seat 3,000 spectators, is expected to draw an average of 200,000 bowlers to Reno after it opens in 1995.Some Baltimore bowlers can't wait."I think it's going to be great," said M. Theresa Ray, president of the Baltimore Women's Bowling Association, the local chapter of the WIBC.
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Randy Edsall is a stoic man. When the world seems to be burning down around him, he remains unflappable, impervious to the slings and arrows of a universe he cannot control. But there are some things that excite Randy Edsall. Winning at heavily favored Virginia Tech, at Lane Stadium, on the Hokies' Senior Day, for a bowl-clinching sixth victory, excites Randy Edsall. So watch Randy Edsall, champion of discipline and believer of one-game-at-a-time, experience unadulterated ecstasy after C.J. Brown clinched a 27-24 victory over the Hokies.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
Damien Russell is 43 now. It's been 22 years since the former defensive back played for Virginia Tech. Hokies fans might not recognize the name, but Russell is an important figure in the program's history. He is a cousin of the Baltimore-based Fullers - one of the city's most impressive football families - and was the first member to play for Virginia Tech. Russell helped launch a procession of talented Fullers - Vincent Jr., Corey, Kyle and Kendall - from Baltimore to Blacksburg, Va. Two Fullers, senior Kyle and freshman Kendall, play defensive back for Virginia Tech (7-3, 4-2 Atlantic Coast Conference)
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2004
Every Fourth of July, on the shores of Lake Oconee, east of Atlanta, three men gather their families for a summer ritual of utmost importance. Ralph Friedgen, George O'Leary and Frank Beamer play some golf, take their kids out on a boat and take turns singing on the karaoke machine. Friedgen's wife, Gloria, roasts a pig and prepares a meal big enough to feed a small army. The three friends, all successful college football coaches, laugh, have a few drinks, relax and tell stories. They reminisce about the days when they barely had two nickels to rub together, when they shared an apartment as lowly graduate assistants, and they trade opinions on sports, politics, religion and parenthood.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
COLLEGE PARK - Rain had been falling for much of the afternoon as Obi Egekeze steeled himself for a 20-yard field-goal attempt in the final seconds of a tie game against North Carolina State on Oct. 25. The footing was becoming increasingly treacherous, but Maryland's senior kicker wasn't fazed. "My career long is 54 in the rain [in high school]. That definitely gave me confidence about the ability to kick in the rain," Egekeze said. True to form, Egekeze converted the game-winning kick.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2007
The sarcasm oozing from Boston College coach Jeff Jagodzinski on yesterday's Atlantic Coast Conference teleconference indicated he is unfazed by the atmosphere at Virginia Tech's Lane Stadium and tired of answering questions about playing a night game there. (The Hokies are 42-27-1 in night games under coach Frank Beamer.) "They've got lights there, right?" Jagodzinski asked Duane Rankin of the Erie Times-News. Rankin: "Right." "OK. So we should be OK for playing at night. Everyone is bringing up the `Lane Stadium at night'; I was hoping Virginia Tech had lights so we could play."
SPORTS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
If they build it, will you bowl?That's the $30 million question that the city of Reno, Nev., has answered with a definite yes. Groundbreaking on the National Bowling Stadium -- the first bowling stadium in the world -- takes place Jan. 25.The 80-lane facility, which will seat 3,000 spectators, is expected to draw an average of 200,000 bowlers to Reno after it opens in 1995.Some Baltimore bowlers can't wait."I think it's going to be great," said M. Theresa Ray, president of the Baltimore Women's Bowling Association, the local chapter of the WIBC.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - The transformation took place late last season, on what started out as a dreary November afternoon at Virginia Tech's Lane Stadium. Maryland went into Blacksburg thought to be no more than road kill for the Hokies and emerged with a bit of a swagger after a 27-24 overtime victory. When the 2014 Terps make their Big Ten debut Saturday at Indiana, there is a growing confidence about playing on the road. Maryland (3-1) has won four straight true road games, including wins at South Florida on Sept.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
BLACKSBURG, Va. - If Rayna DuBose had sworn to never visit the Virginia Tech campus again, the whole world would have understood. After all, it was here that meningococcal meningitis robbed her of so much. It was here that a promising college basketball career turned into a nightmare. It was here, in April, that she slipped into a coma after lifting weights one day with the Hokies women's basketball team, and nearly lost her life. When DuBose woke up in the University of Virginia Medical Center three weeks later, doctors told her the infection, which caused swelling in her brain and spinal cord, had caused so much tissue damage, they needed to amputate her hands and feet.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.