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By Jon Scieszka | March 29, 2000
Editor's note: What do you do when your day is filled with one problem after another? Find out how one girl breaks her Math Curse. The average modern baseball player 3.) Babe Ruth = The average modern baseball player I stagger out of school. I'm a math zombie now. I have to find something to break this math curse. I decide to try chocolate. My favorite candy bar is usually 50c. But guess what? Today it's on sale for 50% off: I decide to buy licorice instead. I pull out my money. I have a $5 bill, a $1 bill, a quarter and a penny.
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NEWS
By Jon Scieszka | March 29, 2000
Editor's note: What do you do when your day is filled with one problem after another? Find out how one girl breaks her Math Curse. The average modern baseball player 3.) Babe Ruth = The average modern baseball player I stagger out of school. I'm a math zombie now. I have to find something to break this math curse. I decide to try chocolate. My favorite candy bar is usually 50c. But guess what? Today it's on sale for 50% off: I decide to buy licorice instead. I pull out my money. I have a $5 bill, a $1 bill, a quarter and a penny.
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FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | March 13, 1993
All children are creative -- they paint, sculpt, dance, act, sing, play instruments, make up stories, create poems -- until something or someone discourages them. Or fails to encourage them.Here are some books to encourage young artists to keep right on drawing and painting and creating.* Inspiration abounds in "Talking with Artists," compiled and edited by Pat Cummings (Bradbury Press, $18.95, ages 9 and up).Ms. Cummings, an award-winning children's book illustrator, interviews 14 of the best in the business: Victoria Chess, Leo and Diane Dillon, Richard Egielski, Lois Ehlert, Lisa Campbell Ernst, Tom Feelings, Steven Kellogg, Jerry Pinkney, Amy Schwartz, Lane Smith, Chris Van Allsburg, David Wiesner and herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 30, 1994
Say it ain't so, Albert.But Albert can't say it ain't so, because it is so, and he will weep many bitter tears.Mighty Albert Brooks, hitting a brilliant .396 in the comedy department after such films as "Lost in America" and "Modern Romance" and a brilliant comic presence in "Broadcast News," has struck out. The engine of his big K is "The Scout," as dim and bland and ill-conceived a vehicle as one can remember. Frankly, between "The Scout" and "The Strike," I'll take the strike.The movie is mounted on a baseball fable, delivered in its purest form at the beginning of "The Natural" and possibly having as its antecedent the discovery of Walter Johnson in some Idaho rube league.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 10, 1991
Los Angeles--"Good Sports" has its problems. It is nothing if not uneven.But it also has Farrah Fawcett and Ryan O'Neal, some of the funniest sitcom moments of the year and the most savvy pop culture sensibility since "It's Garry Shandling's Show."Furthermore, there's an almost irresistible prurient appeal to the show, because of who Fawcett and O'Neal are -- real-life roommates who were once two of America's hottest sex symbols.That's enough to give "Good Sports," a new CBS show that premieres at 9:30 tonight on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 30, 1994
Say it ain't so, Albert.But Albert can't say it ain't so, because it is so, and he will weep many bitter tears.Mighty Albert Brooks, hitting a brilliant .396 in the comedy department after such films as "Lost in America" and "Modern Romance" and a brilliant comic presence in "Broadcast News," has struck out. The engine of his big K is "The Scout," as dim and bland and ill-conceived a vehicle as one can remember. Frankly, between "The Scout" and "The Strike," I'll take the strike.The movie is mounted on a baseball fable, delivered in its purest form at the beginning of "The Natural" and possibly having as its antecedent the discovery of Walter Johnson in some Idaho rube league.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
The saying "A book is a gift you open again and again" becomes a mantra for parents, grandparents, uncles, aunts and anyone else who enjoys giving books to kids for the holidays.They chant it to themselves after little Jessica rips the wrapping paper off the boxed set of Laura Ingalls Wilder paperbacks and then shoves the books aside, undetered in her search for the Barbie Dream Wedding Gift Set that everyone knew she wanted.In a perfect world, February will find Jessica huddled under a comforter with "On the Banks of Plum Creek."
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 24, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Joe Pesci, winner of two critics' association awards for his supporting performance in "GoodFellas," and Ralph Macchio will star in Palo Vista Productions' "My Cousin Vinny," getting under way Feb. 11 in Georgia.Pesci plays a New York attorney, fresh out of law school, who must defend his cousin in a murder trial. Fred Gwynne, Harissa Tomei, Austin Pendleton, Lane Smith and Mitch Whitfield also star in the comedy written by Dale Launer and directed by British director Jonathan Lynn.
FEATURES
April 19, 1998
"I like the book 'Arthur.' It is by Marc Brown. I like Arthur. He is funny and he gets in all kinds of situations."-- Kenneth Waller, Grade 2Bedford Elementary" 'The Stinky Cheese Man,' by Jon Scieszka & Lane Smith, is about a little old man and a little old woman who made a man out of stinky cheese. It is like 'The Ginger Bread Man' and it is a fiction story. 'The Stinky Cheese Man' made me laugh because of the illustrations and they are very good. My favorite part in the story is when the stinky cheese man comes across the cow and I like the picture that goes with it. I also liked the story because it had lots of detail."
FEATURES
September 20, 1998
" 'The Three Little Pigs,' by JonScieszka and illustrated by Lane Smith. The main character is the wolf. You should read this book because you will have lots of laughter."- Devin BakerFederal Hill Elementary"I like 'Charlotte's Web' by E.B. White and pictures by Gart Williams. Wilbur is a pig. He was a runt. He is now a big pig. Charlotte is going to save Wilbur so he will not die. She had to spin a kind of web. Charlotte died. Wilbur was sad, very sad. But he had her children."- Clarisse BidadIlchester Elementary"One of my favorite books is 'Just Grandma and Me' by Merce Mayer.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
The saying "A book is a gift you open again and again" becomes a mantra for parents, grandparents, uncles, aunts and anyone else who enjoys giving books to kids for the holidays.They chant it to themselves after little Jessica rips the wrapping paper off the boxed set of Laura Ingalls Wilder paperbacks and then shoves the books aside, undetered in her search for the Barbie Dream Wedding Gift Set that everyone knew she wanted.In a perfect world, February will find Jessica huddled under a comforter with "On the Banks of Plum Creek."
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | March 13, 1993
All children are creative -- they paint, sculpt, dance, act, sing, play instruments, make up stories, create poems -- until something or someone discourages them. Or fails to encourage them.Here are some books to encourage young artists to keep right on drawing and painting and creating.* Inspiration abounds in "Talking with Artists," compiled and edited by Pat Cummings (Bradbury Press, $18.95, ages 9 and up).Ms. Cummings, an award-winning children's book illustrator, interviews 14 of the best in the business: Victoria Chess, Leo and Diane Dillon, Richard Egielski, Lois Ehlert, Lisa Campbell Ernst, Tom Feelings, Steven Kellogg, Jerry Pinkney, Amy Schwartz, Lane Smith, Chris Van Allsburg, David Wiesner and herself.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 10, 1991
Los Angeles--"Good Sports" has its problems. It is nothing if not uneven.But it also has Farrah Fawcett and Ryan O'Neal, some of the funniest sitcom moments of the year and the most savvy pop culture sensibility since "It's Garry Shandling's Show."Furthermore, there's an almost irresistible prurient appeal to the show, because of who Fawcett and O'Neal are -- real-life roommates who were once two of America's hottest sex symbols.That's enough to give "Good Sports," a new CBS show that premieres at 9:30 tonight on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)
NEWS
May 25, 2005
On May 23, 2005 ELEANOR M. FLOYD (nee Vail); dearest wife of the late James Floyd; devoted mother of Margaret Bowen, Catherine Markowski, Barbara Lane, Eleanor Smith, Roberta Myer and Angela Mc Cauley. Also survived by 9 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren and many other relatives and friends. Christian Wake Service at the Charles L. Stevens Funeral Home Inc, 1501 E. Fort Avenue, Locust Point, MD on Wednesday, at 4 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church on Thursday, at 9 A.M. Interment in Holy Cross Cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 4, 1992
In "The Distinguished Gentleman," Mr. Murphy goes to Washington, and discovers a city that is last in war, last in peace, and not even in the American League any more.The movie itself isn't much better: It's last in laughs, last in drama but first in Murphy ego, as he gives a performance that everybody has seen before, only louder.The gimmick in the plot is that it attempts to reverse the trajectory in all those other Washington movies, the ones where the naive and earnest crusader moves to D.C. and is corrupted by the greed and sleaze that is so a part of the system.
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