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By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 30, 2007
No, Baltimore is not being invaded by hostile forces. If downtown looks a little like a military encampment, rest assured that it's all for show. Piggybacking on tomorrow's 108th Army-Navy football game at M&T Bank Stadium, the two service branches have hauled in all manner of hardware -- including assault vehicles, Humvees, a Black Hawk helicopter, and a dozen ships and landing craft -- mostly as a lure for people who might consider signing up. ...
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By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Leonard T. Schroeder Jr. was a North Linthicum native and a graduate of Glen Burnie High School, but 70 years ago he carved out a moment in history for himself when, on the morning of the Allied invasion of Normandy, he was credited with being the first American to step ashore in France. In the days following the invasion that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe, Schroeder was cited in newspaper clippings as likely being the first American soldier to reach Europe in the amphibious invasion.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Leonard T. Schroeder Jr. was a North Linthicum native and a graduate of Glen Burnie High School, but 70 years ago he carved out a moment in history for himself when, on the morning of the Allied invasion of Normandy, he was credited with being the first American to step ashore in France. In the days following the invasion that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe, Schroeder was cited in newspaper clippings as likely being the first American soldier to reach Europe in the amphibious invasion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
George Francis Kerchner, a highly decorated Army Ranger who on D-Day successfully led an attack on enemy gun positions that earned him the Distinguished Service Cross, died Friday at his home in Midlothian, Va., of complications from a fall. He was 93. The son of a drug company manager and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised on North Lyndhurst Avenue. He attended Polytechnic Institute until the 11th grade, when he left school to help support his family. He worked as a soda jerk for Arundel Ice Cream Co., which had been established by an uncle, and later as a security guard for the Pennsylvania Railroad.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 7, 1994
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France -- On the bluffs above Omaha Beach, 10 buses unloaded veterans of the 29th Infantry Division. They were walking reverently through the American Cemetery, and they were crying.Ben Mirmelstein, a retired insurance-company vice president from Dallas, trembled slightly as he reached Plot J, Row 19, No. 15 and gazed down at the lush grass above Leonard D. Kerperien, a gunner in his machine-gun squad."That's why I came here," he said later. "Not for the ceremonies but to honor my buddies.
NEWS
June 6, 1994
News was as instantaneous then as now, only the means were short-wave radio and telegraph wires. The Sun's 7 a.m. Extra edition of June 6, 1944 -- on the street as people came to work -- had the story they had been waiting for:ALLIES INVADING FRANCETROOPS LAND IN NORMANDYIn Cumberland, whistles blew and bells rang. In Hagerstown, fire alarms sounded. But in Baltimore, "Rejoicing quickly was tempered by anxiety for friends and loved ones." Bars were closed by order of the governor. Churches and synagogues opened doors to streams of worshipers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 13, 2011
John Polyniak, a World War II veteran who landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day and later was severely wounded during the battle for St. Lo, died June 7 of heart failure at the Encore at Turf Valley assisted-living facility in Ellicott City. Mr. Polyniak's death at 92 came 67 years and a day after he stormed ashore in France with his comrades of Company C, 116th Infantry, of the 29th Division, in the first frenetic predawn moments of the D-Day invasion. "This was a big day in my life," he wrote in an unpublished account of the invasion.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | May 31, 1994
Much has been filmed and written about next week's 50th anniversary of the Normandy invasion, concentrating on the history-making beachhead and the land war that followed.Annapolis naval historian and writer Paul Stillwell is right in there with a new book on D-Day, his sixth.But Mr. Stillwell's approach in "Assault on Normandy: First-Person Accounts from the Sea Services," is less conventional and, given his background and employer, not surprising. His book is a collection of interviews done over two years with many who experienced various aspects of the comparatively less-publicized naval side of Normandy.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 21, 1994
CAP HAITIEN, Haiti -- Rosie Eugenie stood barefoot in the dirt front yard of her concrete block home, the incessant whir of U.S. helicopter engines whining in the background, her family and friends gathered around her as she shouted out: "So, America came in. You don't know how happy we are."She was smiling, broadly and beautifully on the hot afternoon as, two blocks away, Marines stood grim-faced behind barbed wire."We are happy these men are here," she said. "They are going to deliver us from all this.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
George Francis Kerchner, a highly decorated Army Ranger who on D-Day successfully led an attack on enemy gun positions that earned him the Distinguished Service Cross, died Friday at his home in Midlothian, Va., of complications from a fall. He was 93. The son of a drug company manager and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised on North Lyndhurst Avenue. He attended Polytechnic Institute until the 11th grade, when he left school to help support his family. He worked as a soda jerk for Arundel Ice Cream Co., which had been established by an uncle, and later as a security guard for the Pennsylvania Railroad.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 13, 2011
John Polyniak, a World War II veteran who landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day and later was severely wounded during the battle for St. Lo, died June 7 of heart failure at the Encore at Turf Valley assisted-living facility in Ellicott City. Mr. Polyniak's death at 92 came 67 years and a day after he stormed ashore in France with his comrades of Company C, 116th Infantry, of the 29th Division, in the first frenetic predawn moments of the D-Day invasion. "This was a big day in my life," he wrote in an unpublished account of the invasion.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 30, 2007
No, Baltimore is not being invaded by hostile forces. If downtown looks a little like a military encampment, rest assured that it's all for show. Piggybacking on tomorrow's 108th Army-Navy football game at M&T Bank Stadium, the two service branches have hauled in all manner of hardware -- including assault vehicles, Humvees, a Black Hawk helicopter, and a dozen ships and landing craft -- mostly as a lure for people who might consider signing up. ...
NEWS
By Story by JONATHAN PITTS and Story by JONATHAN PITTS,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
COLLEVILLE - SUR-MER, France -- Sixty years ago this morning, just a half-mile off the coast of Normandy, high winds tossed the flimsy landing craft in which Charles "Harry" Heinlein was riding. It was the first time the 22-year-old Army private from Baltimore would hit Omaha Beach. As the roar of German guns reached his ears, the rough weather seemed a reflection of his rapidly pounding heart. "Let me put it this way," said Heinlein recently. "It wasn't a quiet place." Three days ago, when he returned to Omaha Beach for the first time since taking part in the Allied invasion on June 6, 1944, he arrived not in a landing craft but in an air-conditioned tour bus. He wore not an assault vest and helmet but a tie, a blue blazer, and the yin-and-yang symbol pin of the fabled "Blue and Gray," his 29th Infantry Division.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The Maryland-built NEAR spacecraft is circling the asteroid Eros at an altitude of as little as 12 miles - its closest approach since arriving at the ancient space rock in February. "This is the payoff time," said NEAR project scientist Andrew Cheng of the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab in Laurel. Thousands of photos sent back by NEAR have revealed the 21-mile-long asteroid to be a bleak and battered place, cratered by meteorites and strewn with jagged boulders the size of buildings.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 21, 1994
CAP HAITIEN, Haiti -- Rosie Eugenie stood barefoot in the dirt front yard of her concrete block home, the incessant whir of U.S. helicopter engines whining in the background, her family and friends gathered around her as she shouted out: "So, America came in. You don't know how happy we are."She was smiling, broadly and beautifully on the hot afternoon as, two blocks away, Marines stood grim-faced behind barbed wire."We are happy these men are here," she said. "They are going to deliver us from all this.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 7, 1994
COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France -- On the bluffs above Omaha Beach, 10 buses unloaded veterans of the 29th Infantry Division. They were walking reverently through the American Cemetery, and they were crying.Ben Mirmelstein, a retired insurance-company vice president from Dallas, trembled slightly as he reached Plot J, Row 19, No. 15 and gazed down at the lush grass above Leonard D. Kerperien, a gunner in his machine-gun squad."That's why I came here," he said later. "Not for the ceremonies but to honor my buddies.
NEWS
By Story by JONATHAN PITTS and Story by JONATHAN PITTS,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2004
COLLEVILLE - SUR-MER, France -- Sixty years ago this morning, just a half-mile off the coast of Normandy, high winds tossed the flimsy landing craft in which Charles "Harry" Heinlein was riding. It was the first time the 22-year-old Army private from Baltimore would hit Omaha Beach. As the roar of German guns reached his ears, the rough weather seemed a reflection of his rapidly pounding heart. "Let me put it this way," said Heinlein recently. "It wasn't a quiet place." Three days ago, when he returned to Omaha Beach for the first time since taking part in the Allied invasion on June 6, 1944, he arrived not in a landing craft but in an air-conditioned tour bus. He wore not an assault vest and helmet but a tie, a blue blazer, and the yin-and-yang symbol pin of the fabled "Blue and Gray," his 29th Infantry Division.
NEWS
June 6, 1994
News was as instantaneous then as now, only the means were short-wave radio and telegraph wires. The Sun's 7 a.m. Extra edition of June 6, 1944 -- on the street as people came to work -- had the story they had been waiting for:ALLIES INVADING FRANCETROOPS LAND IN NORMANDYIn Cumberland, whistles blew and bells rang. In Hagerstown, fire alarms sounded. But in Baltimore, "Rejoicing quickly was tempered by anxiety for friends and loved ones." Bars were closed by order of the governor. Churches and synagogues opened doors to streams of worshipers.
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