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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2006
It's praised as a win-win deal for everyone: The U.S. Coast Guard gets a cheap supply of energy, cash-hungry Baltimore receives a total of $3 million, and tons of landfill gas laden with methane are prevented from leaking into the atmosphere. Under an agreement scheduled to be announced today, the Coast Guard will pay the city $200,000 annually for 15 years for the methane, which will come from the city's Quarantine Road Landfill, where it accumulates naturally as solid waste decays. The gas will be piped about a mile to the Coast Guard shipyard in Curtis Bay, where a methane-powered co-generation plant will generate electricity and produce enough steam to heat the shipyard during the winter.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Howard County officials say they will likely spend up to $50,000 on emissions testing for a new generator that will produce energy from methane gas given off by Alpha Ridge Landfill, after neighbors raised concerns over how the project might affect air quality. The decision last week came after an informational meeting held in Marriottsville by the department of public works, which is overseeing the proposed combustion engine. "If they can't prove to me it's safe, then don't tell me it's safe," said one resident, Geff Ottman, during Monday's meeting at Marriotts Ridge High School.
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BUSINESS
By Grant Ferrier and Grant Ferrier,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 31, 1990
Decaying garbage is lighting up homes across America.Today, more than 300 megawatts of electricity, just a fraction of the overall potential, is being generated from landfill methane and sold to electric utilities by independent power companies and solid-waste management firms.That's enough to supply the residential needs of a city the size of Wichita, Kan.Landfill gas-recovery projects in the United States have proliferated from a handful in 1980 to some 155 today. Another 30 are in planning and construction stages.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
The Sun's recent editorial on incinerators ("Clean power or dirty air?" Oct. 17). implies that an environmental group's recent report on waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators exposes new data that Maryland's governor should have utilized to decide not to raise WTE to a Tier 1 renewable energy source. I disagree. The release of this report does not change the landscape of the debate. The report itself merely represents one advocacy group's cherry-picked analysis of a complex issue.
NEWS
January 6, 2011
Maryland requires that its electric utilities buy part of their electricity from renewable sources, a portion that will grow to 20 percent by 2022. Mike Tidwell's commentary in Wednesday's Sun argues that the General Assembly should carve out a portion of that requirement and reserve it for offshore wind power ( "A propitious wind," Dec. 5). This carve-out would be at the expense of other renewable energy sources. It would do little for the environment and could increase consumer costs.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
The Sun's recent editorial on incinerators ("Clean power or dirty air?" Oct. 17). implies that an environmental group's recent report on waste-to-energy (WTE) incinerators exposes new data that Maryland's governor should have utilized to decide not to raise WTE to a Tier 1 renewable energy source. I disagree. The release of this report does not change the landscape of the debate. The report itself merely represents one advocacy group's cherry-picked analysis of a complex issue.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
The late U.S. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan's once famously said in debate, "Sir, you are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts. " With that in mind, we take issue with the Sun's May 9 editorial on Maryland waste-to-energy (WTE) legislation ("O'Malley should trash waste-to-energy bill") which would treat WTE like other renewables, in particular landfill gas-to-energy. The legislation has passed the Maryland legislature, but your editorial urges a veto by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
For five years, Donald L. Gill has been lighting fires under Howard County officials about the problem of ground-water pollution from the county's Alpha Ridge Landfill, less than a mile from his Marriottsville home.Now the University of Maryland biochemistry professor is doing the same on a national level, but he's finding his own seat getting a little hot as well.Dr. Gill, 41, is getting calls from around the country -- some questioning his motives -- as a result of his recent 30-page study of landfill air pollution.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Howard County officials say they will likely spend up to $50,000 on emissions testing for a new generator that will produce energy from methane gas given off by Alpha Ridge Landfill, after neighbors raised concerns over how the project might affect air quality. The decision last week came after an informational meeting held in Marriottsville by the department of public works, which is overseeing the proposed combustion engine. "If they can't prove to me it's safe, then don't tell me it's safe," said one resident, Geff Ottman, during Monday's meeting at Marriotts Ridge High School.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
Howard County officials -- stung by recent suggestions that the Alpha Ridge Landfill is a threat to its neighbors -- went on the public-relations offensive last night with new tests and a new expert to testify to the landfill's safety.Laura Green, a toxicologist from Cambridge, Mass., flown down by the county, told about 40 Marriottsville residents that she thought gases at the landfill exist in concentrations too low to affect their health."When you think about cancer in your neighborhood and you think about the landfill, stop and think about all these other causes," Green said, listing estrogen, sunlight, alcohol, asbestos, cigarettes and radiation.
NEWS
May 17, 2011
The late U.S. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan's once famously said in debate, "Sir, you are entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts. " With that in mind, we take issue with the Sun's May 9 editorial on Maryland waste-to-energy (WTE) legislation ("O'Malley should trash waste-to-energy bill") which would treat WTE like other renewables, in particular landfill gas-to-energy. The legislation has passed the Maryland legislature, but your editorial urges a veto by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
January 6, 2011
Maryland requires that its electric utilities buy part of their electricity from renewable sources, a portion that will grow to 20 percent by 2022. Mike Tidwell's commentary in Wednesday's Sun argues that the General Assembly should carve out a portion of that requirement and reserve it for offshore wind power ( "A propitious wind," Dec. 5). This carve-out would be at the expense of other renewable energy sources. It would do little for the environment and could increase consumer costs.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2006
It's praised as a win-win deal for everyone: The U.S. Coast Guard gets a cheap supply of energy, cash-hungry Baltimore receives a total of $3 million, and tons of landfill gas laden with methane are prevented from leaking into the atmosphere. Under an agreement scheduled to be announced today, the Coast Guard will pay the city $200,000 annually for 15 years for the methane, which will come from the city's Quarantine Road Landfill, where it accumulates naturally as solid waste decays. The gas will be piped about a mile to the Coast Guard shipyard in Curtis Bay, where a methane-powered co-generation plant will generate electricity and produce enough steam to heat the shipyard during the winter.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
Howard County officials -- stung by recent suggestions that the Alpha Ridge Landfill is a threat to its neighbors -- went on the public-relations offensive last night with new tests and a new expert to testify to the landfill's safety.Laura Green, a toxicologist from Cambridge, Mass., flown down by the county, told about 40 Marriottsville residents that she thought gases at the landfill exist in concentrations too low to affect their health."When you think about cancer in your neighborhood and you think about the landfill, stop and think about all these other causes," Green said, listing estrogen, sunlight, alcohol, asbestos, cigarettes and radiation.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
For five years, Donald L. Gill has been lighting fires under Howard County officials about the problem of ground-water pollution from the county's Alpha Ridge Landfill, less than a mile from his Marriottsville home.Now the University of Maryland biochemistry professor is doing the same on a national level, but he's finding his own seat getting a little hot as well.Dr. Gill, 41, is getting calls from around the country -- some questioning his motives -- as a result of his recent 30-page study of landfill air pollution.
BUSINESS
By Grant Ferrier and Grant Ferrier,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 31, 1990
Decaying garbage is lighting up homes across America.Today, more than 300 megawatts of electricity, just a fraction of the overall potential, is being generated from landfill methane and sold to electric utilities by independent power companies and solid-waste management firms.That's enough to supply the residential needs of a city the size of Wichita, Kan.Landfill gas-recovery projects in the United States have proliferated from a handful in 1980 to some 155 today. Another 30 are in planning and construction stages.
EXPLORE
December 5, 2011
Howard County officials have requested a permit from the state to operate an internal combustion engine that burns the methane gas from the Alpha Ridge landfill to generate electricity with investment at almost $4 million. It is a fact that using internal combustion engines to produce electricity from landfill gas is more polluting than currently used flaring. Mercury, dioxins and furans are some of the most toxic chemicals known to science and are human carcinogens. Burning gas doesn't "destroy" it, but can change it into a different set of pollutants.
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