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NEWS
May 17, 2010
Pimlico racecourse chose cheap-and-dirty over environmentally-responsible when it came time to "clean up" after the Preakness ("Preakness crowd big, but cleanup goes fast," May 17). I would bet at least 50 percent of the 100 tons of refuse carted off to the incinerator was recyclable. They wanted to get their hourly workers out of there as quickly as possible rather than do the right thing for the environment. As the worker interviewed in the piece said, she wished it had been possible to separate out recyclables.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Thomas D. McKewen, a materials recovery and waste management expert who was the founding director of Maryland Environmental Service, died June 13 of congestive heart failure at his home in Ashburn, Va. The former Towson resident was 86. "I had been hearing that he was a person with a lot of ability and had an understanding of the environmental work we were doing," said former Gov. Marvin J. Mandel, who appointed Mr. McKewen as director of the...
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NEWS
February 4, 2010
In response to the article "Odor Complaints at Millersville landfill on the rise" (Jan. 31), I am writing to further inform readers about the ongoing efforts of the Department of Public Works in regards to our neighbors' concerns. Since January of 2009, during normal operating hours and non-operating hours, the Maryland Department of the Enviornment conducted 30 investigations relating to our neighbors concerns and only detected off-site odors on three occasions. They classified the odors as "very slight."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council banned new rubble landfills throughout the county at its meeting Monday night, dismissing warnings from the county attorney that the measure could be challenged in court. The bill, which started as a ban on rubble landfills in residential areas but was amended to include the entire county, passed by a 7-0 vote in Annapolis. The ban would go into effect Jan. 1. Council members voted for the ban over the objections of the county executive's office and the county attorney.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
Frank Marion used to light candles to mask the odor. Marion, who owns a home about 300 feet from the Millersville landfill, has complained since 2008 about the smell of rotten eggs permeating his home on an almost-daily basis. Now, Marion and other neighbors say the odor has gotten progressively worse - stronger and more frequent - and is causing nausea, vomiting and headaches among some residents. "It has totally destroyed my life," Marion said. Last week, about a dozen of the residents met to discuss remedies: They are requesting that Anne Arundel County appoint a third party to monitor emissions from the landfill and to test the air and well water to determine if there are any contaminants.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | November 21, 1995
Changes at Northern Landfill scheduled to be implemented Nov. 30 will allow for better traffic flow at the facility, Carroll County Deputy Public Works Director Gary L. Horst said.The county has installed a second scale at the landfill on Route 140 in Reese, which will help prevent traffic back-ups, he said.Truck unloading activity has been concentrated at Northern since the county closed Hoods Mill Landfill in Woodbine this year.Another change is that recycling activities have been consolidated in one area at the landfill to make it more convenient for residents, Mr. Horst said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2011
State environmental officials approved new coal-ash landfill in southeast Baltimore Tuesday, saying "state-of-the-art" pollution controls there should allay nearby residents' fears that the power plant waste will blow into their neighborhoods and leak into the Patapsco River. After more than a year of deliberation, the Maryland Department of the Environment authorized the disposal of up to 650,000 tons of ash in a specially prepared section of a chemical company landfill at Hawkins Point.
NEWS
November 4, 1993
As more barrels of toxic substances are unearthed from a Howard County landfill, the legacy of ignorance and shortsightedness swells.The latest nightmare came with the recent discovery of 11 more large drums of toxics at the county's Carrs Mill Landfill. That brings to 161 the number of containers found at the landfill, further compounding the cleanup.Efforts have been launched to determine how the drums were dumped and by whom. But assigning blame will do little to solve the enormous problem that confronts county officials.
NEWS
March 13, 1993
The Parkton landfill saga continues to take odd twists and turns, a decade after the 217-acre dump in northern Baltimore County was closed.For several years, Parkton residents living near the landfill have said the facility was leaking contaminants into the local water table. Private tests supported these claims.Maryland environmental officials say the water is polluted, in part because of the landfill, while the county contends it hasn't found undue contamination in area wells. Yet the federal Environmental RTC Protection Agency determined last year that groundwater near the landfill poses an "increased cancer risk."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | November 5, 1992
It may not matter to many residents that county government is trying to figure out what to do with the 180,000 tons of trash it generates each year, but Arthur Grace cares."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
For more than two decades, residents of western Anne Arundel County have fought against proposed rubble landfills that they say would bring traffic, dust and noise to their community. Now their hopes rest with the fate of a bill before the County Council that would ban such landfills from residential zones, instead relegating them to industrial areas. Several members of the County Council seemed eager to pass the bill at their last meeting, but the county's top lawyer cautioned that such a change to zoning rules comes with the risk of lawsuits.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
Living near Baltimore County's Eastern Sanitary Landfill is no doubt unpleasant. The facility is huge - 375 acres - and handles about a quarter of Baltimore County's solid waste, or almost 75,000 tons of trash a year. Residents of the neighborhoods adjacent to it complain of unpredictable odors that substantially diminish their enjoyment of their property. But a proposal pending in the General Assembly to allow for property tax breaks for the affected communities is the wrong approach.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Homes in Bowerman-Loreley Beach in eastern Baltimore County look like they're on prime property, with views of the Bird River and easy access to a marina. But the waterfront community also has a feature neighbors say isn't quite as idyllic: the 375-acre Eastern Sanitary Landfill. "There's no way to predict when it's going to smell," said resident Betsy Eisbart. Residents want compensation for living near the landfill, and state lawmakers are considering it. A measure is currently before the General Assembly to authorize the county to grant about 120 families near the landfill relief from property taxes.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
The body of a 2-year-old Annapolis girl was found Thursday night in garbage bound for a Virginia landfill, police said, and documents charging her mother with first-degree murder say Chelsea Booth admitted to smothering her daughter and dumping the body. Police were awaiting results of an autopsy of Kassidey Capri Booth performed Friday by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, hoping to learn if it supports what 25-year-old Booth told detectives earlier in the week. Questioned by investigators following a tip that the girl had not been seen in a few days, Booth said the girl's father put a "Muslim curse" on her and that she "believed Kassidey to be possessed by an evil spirit," according to charging documents.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2013
The operator of three coal-fired power plants in Maryland has agreed to pay a total of $2.2 million in penalties and fix long-standing pollution problems at the landfills in Southern Maryland and Montgomery County where it disposes of the ash from those plants, according to court documents. In a proposed consent decree filed recently in U.S. District Court, subsidiaries of GenOn Energy, a Houston power company, agreed to settle lawsuits by Maryland and environmental groups alleging that the company's Brandywine, Faulkner and Westland coal-ash landfills have been polluting groundwater and nearby streams.
FEATURES
Laurel Peltier | October 8, 2012
(Another in an occasional series of guest posts by GreenLaurel.com blogger Laurel Peltier) So you finally finished de-cluttering your basement, and the burning question is: Where to recycle golf clubs, VHS tapes, eyeglasses, bikes, books and stuffed animals - among other things.  Find the answers in the How to Recycle ANYTHING in Baltimore guide. This on-line tool suggests local charities (where possible) that accept your hard-to-recycle items not normally collected in single-stream recycling.
NEWS
September 23, 1990
The next three weeks will be a good time to clean out cluttered garages and basements and dump the trash free at Northern Landfill.The county's annual free days at the landfill will be Oct. 6 and 13. The days give residents a chance to bring even a pickup full of garbage without having to pay the $4 charge."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
Howard County officials say they will likely spend up to $50,000 on emissions testing for a new generator that will produce energy from methane gas given off by Alpha Ridge Landfill, after neighbors raised concerns over how the project might affect air quality. The decision last week came after an informational meeting held in Marriottsville by the department of public works, which is overseeing the proposed combustion engine. "If they can't prove to me it's safe, then don't tell me it's safe," said one resident, Geff Ottman, during Monday's meeting at Marriotts Ridge High School.
NEWS
October 18, 2011
Regarding Nicole Fuller 's recent article about Anne Arundel County's Piney Orchard community, I am strongly opposed to the Tolson Rubble Landfill ("In Anne Arundel community, growth runs up against industry," Oct. 2). First, the proposed site is situated in the middle of a densely populated area. It would be highly irresponsible to put a landfill, let alone a rubble landfill with fugitive dust emissions, in such close proximity to a residential area. Secondly, the refuse disposal application submitted by Tolson & Associates is based on outdated information.
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