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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Tropical Storm Karen is forecast to make landfall on the coasts of Louisiana or Mississippi on Saturday, possibly as a weak hurricane, or at least close to that strength. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of Friday morning, moving within 300 miles of the mouth of the Mississippi River. To reach hurricane status, sustained winds must be at least 74 mph. Karen is not forecast to strengthen significantly Friday, but could on Saturday, according to National Hurricane Center forecasts.
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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
Tropical Storm Karen, which had previously been thought to have the potential to turn into a hurricane once it made landfall, fell apart on Sunday. Andy Woodcock, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said Karen's "final death knell" was at around 2 p.m. Sunday, when it was downgraded to a low pressure area. Before that, it was downgraded to a tropical depression. The storm in the Gulf of Mexico had been forecast to make landfall with a path headed toward Maryland.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
Tropical Storm Karen, which had previously been thought to have the potential to turn into a hurricane once it made landfall, fell apart on Sunday. Andy Woodcock, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said Karen's "final death knell" was at around 2 p.m. Sunday, when it was downgraded to a low pressure area. Before that, it was downgraded to a tropical depression. The storm in the Gulf of Mexico had been forecast to make landfall with a path headed toward Maryland.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
Tropical Storm Karen is forecast to make landfall on the coasts of Louisiana or Mississippi on Saturday, possibly as a weak hurricane, or at least close to that strength. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of Friday morning, moving within 300 miles of the mouth of the Mississippi River. To reach hurricane status, sustained winds must be at least 74 mph. Karen is not forecast to strengthen significantly Friday, but could on Saturday, according to National Hurricane Center forecasts.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 20, 2008
John Stratton writes from Catonsville: "Has a hurricane ever split into two separate storms?" Jeepers, John, haven't we got enough to worry about in this brutal hurricane season without dreaming up new nightmares? These storms sure can spin off violent squalls, tornadoes and drenching rain bands. And Ike was pulled apart after landfall and absorbed by surrounding weather systems. But hatch a clone? Can't happen.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 20, 2012
There is an 80 percent chance Tropical Storm Isaac will have formed near the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean Sea by Wednesday morning, according to the National Hurricane Center. It's still too early to predict the storm's track, but weather-watching enthusiasts are discussing the possibility that it could make a turn toward the north and impact the East Coast. It's also possible it could move toward the Gulf of Mexico states or the Yucatan Peninsula, or that it could disintegrate thanks to dry air and high wind shear, of course.
NEWS
By Roger Roy, Jason Garcia and John Kennedy and Roger Roy, Jason Garcia and John Kennedy,ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 12, 2005
PENSACOLA, Fla. - The damage and death toll continued to climb yesterday as authorities and residents tallied the widely scattered destruction left by Hurricane Dennis. While Dennis caused less damage than feared after its landfall Sunday east of Pensacola, it nonetheless was blamed for pockets of flooding and wind damage across a wide swath of the Panhandle. Gov. Jeb Bush toured storm-damaged areas yesterday, his visit delayed by lingering rough weather. Dennis was downgraded to a tropical depression but continued to dump heavy rain as it headed north.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and Jenny Jarvie and John-Thor Dahlburg and Jenny Jarvie,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 27, 2005
HOMESTEAD, Fla. - One day after Hurricane Katrina delivered a soggy wallop to some of Miami's southwestern suburbs, where streets and neighborhoods were under water yesterday, Florida's emergency planners were bracing for a second landfall by the hurricane as an even more dangerous storm. After crossing the southern tip of the Florida Peninsula, where its winds and downpours Thursday evening led to widespread street flooding and at least six deaths, Katrina reached the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, where it absorbed enough energy to boost its sustained winds to 100 mph. Forecasters said the storm, a Category 2 hurricane, might intensify further as it turned north and headed toward the Gulf Coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
AccuWeather.com is predicting another active Atlantic hurricane season, particularly for the U.S. coastline. While the Pennsylvania-based meteorology company is calling for fewer storms in all, with 16 tropical storms versus 19 in 2012, AccuWeather's season outlook suggests four storms could become major hurricanes, compared with one in 2012. AccuWeather expects three storms to make landfall in the U.S., compared with four in 2012. "After a devastating blow to the East from Superstorm Sandy in October of 2012, residents and homeowners on the Atlantic coast should anticipate another active season in 2013," the forecast warns.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2005
The phone and electric lines were down. The towers that relay cell phone calls were not working. In the days after Hurricane Katrina struck, portions of the Gulf Coast were isolated from the rest of the world. The situation seemed like a perfect test for Anne Arundel County's new Mobile Command and Control Unit. Responding last month to one of the Louisiana communities hardest hit by Katrina, Jefferson Parish, 10 county fire personnel were among a group that took the unit there and performed disaster relief -- not with ladders and hoses, but with laptops and digital phones.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
AccuWeather.com is predicting another active Atlantic hurricane season, particularly for the U.S. coastline. While the Pennsylvania-based meteorology company is calling for fewer storms in all, with 16 tropical storms versus 19 in 2012, AccuWeather's season outlook suggests four storms could become major hurricanes, compared with one in 2012. AccuWeather expects three storms to make landfall in the U.S., compared with four in 2012. "After a devastating blow to the East from Superstorm Sandy in October of 2012, residents and homeowners on the Atlantic coast should anticipate another active season in 2013," the forecast warns.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 20, 2012
There is an 80 percent chance Tropical Storm Isaac will have formed near the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean Sea by Wednesday morning, according to the National Hurricane Center. It's still too early to predict the storm's track, but weather-watching enthusiasts are discussing the possibility that it could make a turn toward the north and impact the East Coast. It's also possible it could move toward the Gulf of Mexico states or the Yucatan Peninsula, or that it could disintegrate thanks to dry air and high wind shear, of course.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
Next weekend marks the sixth anniversary of Tropical Storm Isabel's deadly tromp across Central Maryland. The storm made landfall Sept. 18 near Ocracoke, N.C. with top winds of 105 mph. It quickly weakened. But Isabel's storm surge flooded the Chesapeake waterfront, including Baltimore, Annapolis and many bayshore communities. Seven people died in Maryland, and damages came to more than $1 billion.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 13, 2008
GALVESTON, Texas - Punishing winds and waves from Hurricane Ike smashed into this low-lying barrier island yesterday, flooding roads and providing a preview of what authorities predicted would be catastrophic damage to Galveston - and possibly Houston and other inland areas. The storm, as big as Texas and packing winds of at least 110 mph, was expected to slam into the coast somewhere near Galveston just after midnight. Forecasters predicted that the storm's "dirty side," with the heaviest storm surge and highest winds, would batter Houston, the nation's fourth-largest city.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2005
The phone and electric lines were down. The towers that relay cell phone calls were not working. In the days after Hurricane Katrina struck, portions of the Gulf Coast were isolated from the rest of the world. The situation seemed like a perfect test for Anne Arundel County's new Mobile Command and Control Unit. Responding last month to one of the Louisiana communities hardest hit by Katrina, Jefferson Parish, 10 county fire personnel were among a group that took the unit there and performed disaster relief -- not with ladders and hoses, but with laptops and digital phones.
NEWS
By John-Thor Dahlburg and Jenny Jarvie and John-Thor Dahlburg and Jenny Jarvie,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 27, 2005
HOMESTEAD, Fla. - One day after Hurricane Katrina delivered a soggy wallop to some of Miami's southwestern suburbs, where streets and neighborhoods were under water yesterday, Florida's emergency planners were bracing for a second landfall by the hurricane as an even more dangerous storm. After crossing the southern tip of the Florida Peninsula, where its winds and downpours Thursday evening led to widespread street flooding and at least six deaths, Katrina reached the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, where it absorbed enough energy to boost its sustained winds to 100 mph. Forecasters said the storm, a Category 2 hurricane, might intensify further as it turned north and headed toward the Gulf Coast.
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