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By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
Two recent surprise inspections by federal investigators at Kingsley Park Apartments in Baltimore County found widespread housing violations, including rodent and roach infestation, potentially dangerous electrical problems, faulty toilets and rotting floors. As a result of the findings, contained in a 23-page report by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, federal officials have advised county leaders that contracts between HUD and Landex Corp., the owner of the complex, be reviewed to assure compliance with housing standards for the more than 300 tenants.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
The developer of Westport's waterfront is selling an acre of the property along Baltimore's Middle Branch of the Patapsco to a company planning to build a luxury apartment building - part of the first phase of new construction in the proposed $1.2 billion mixed-use community. Baltimore-based Turner Development, headed by developer Patrick Turner, has signed a contract with Landex Development LLC for a parcel at the southern end of the development site a block from the Westport light rail station.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Landex Corp., the company that Baltimore County is pressuring to renovate the dilapidated Kingsley Park Apartments in Essex, has been the target of angry tenants -- and legal action -- resulting from conditions there and at a new Baltimore townhouse complex. At Kingsley Park, residents have formed a tenants association and are planning to place their monthly rents in escrow in hopes of getting repairs made quickly. And last week, at the urging of Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development performed two surprise inspections that found that 34 of 39 apartments did not meet housing standards.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
Barbara Thomas still can't believe it. "Look at this," she says, escorting a visitor through her new home, a two-bedroom apartment in The Commons at White Marsh in eastern Baltimore County. "Wall-to-wall carpeting. ... Walk-in closets. ... My own washer-dryer." But more than anything, she savors the comforting sounds of silence. Her newfound peace is in sharp contrast to the gunshots, police sirens and helicopters she heard so often during the two years she lived in Kingsley Park, a dilapidated apartment complex in Middle River.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan yesterday tentatively approved a $7 million bid by a group headed by Landex Corp. of Warwick, R.I., which plans to buy and redevelop an apartment complex in Baltimore's Reservoir Hill neighborhood.Despite community requests that a decision be postponed, Judge Kaplan agreed to sign a contract that gives the prospective buyer 75 days to inspect the Renaissance Plaza apartments and decide whether to buy the buildings and spend $21.6 million renovating them.The group has to return to the judge for final approval once the financing is in place.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
The top area official of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development said last night that the agency supports a proposal by a Rhode Island-based company to buy and renovate the condemned Bay Ridge Gardens complex.Maxine S. Saunders, HUD area manager in Baltimore, expressed support for Landex Corp., an investment company, at a meeting last night in Annapolis City Hall at which 35 Bay Ridge residents also supported the proposal."We are very, very impressed and proud of what Landex Corp.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
The developer of Westport's waterfront is selling an acre of the property along Baltimore's Middle Branch of the Patapsco to a company planning to build a luxury apartment building - part of the first phase of new construction in the proposed $1.2 billion mixed-use community. Baltimore-based Turner Development, headed by developer Patrick Turner, has signed a contract with Landex Development LLC for a parcel at the southern end of the development site a block from the Westport light rail station.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
Averting a potential court battle, a powerful developer and Baltimore County officials have struck an agreement over the short-term future of the troubled Kingsley Park apartments in Essex. The crafting of a truce between the county and Landex Corp.'s president, Judith S. Siegel, assures the mostly low-income tenants at Kingsley Park of keeping their homes at least through 2003. "A lot of positive things are happening on the east side, and one way or another, we wanted to stop Kingsley Park from negatively impacting the quality of life there," said County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A dilapidated, low-income apartment complex in Annapolis that was condemned by the city last month would receive a $4.3 million face lift under a proposal by a Rhode Island company.Landex Corp., a Warwick-based investment company, wants to buy and completely overhaul the brick complex off Bay Ridge Avenue.In a detailed proposal to the Annapolis city government, the company outlined plans to install new roofs, furnaces and siding, as well as replace kitchen and bathroom fixtures in the 197-unit Bay Ridge Gardens.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
FEDERAL INSPECTORS who recently have descended on a rundown Essex low-income apartment complex saw the obvious: Kingsley Park, which dates back to the 1940s, needs to be torn down and rebuilt. The development's owners, Landex Corp., and Baltimore County agree. But they are so busy blaming one another for Kingsley Park's current and past troubles they cannot figure out how to get rid of the eyesore, which is a hub for drugs and other illegal activity. They need a referee. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski -- who has called on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to rigorously monitor Kingsley Park and who was instrumental in persuading inspectors to investigate complaints about the development -- is tailor-made for that role.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2004
The final chapter of the Kingsley Park saga begins this week as more than 100 residents move from their dilapidated apartments in eastern Baltimore County to new homes. By next month, the county will own the property and by late fall hopes to have all 285 families in safer residences. Officials will then begin plans to demolish the squat, World War II-era buildings and begin a community of affordable housing and residences for senior citizens. If they qualify, Kingsley residents can obtain federal housing vouchers, while the county government will underwrite moving and utility expenses.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2003
A "blitz" inspection yesterday by a team of Baltimore County investigators at Kingsley Park apartments - a complex at the center of a redevelopment battle between the county and the landlord - uncovered housing infractions in nearly 150 units and several more serious violations, including raw sewage in basements. Timothy M. Kotroco, county director of Permits and Development Management, said Landex Corp., owner of the Essex complex, will need to address the worst violations within 48 hours.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
Two recent surprise inspections by federal investigators at Kingsley Park Apartments in Baltimore County found widespread housing violations, including rodent and roach infestation, potentially dangerous electrical problems, faulty toilets and rotting floors. As a result of the findings, contained in a 23-page report by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, federal officials have advised county leaders that contracts between HUD and Landex Corp., the owner of the complex, be reviewed to assure compliance with housing standards for the more than 300 tenants.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
FEDERAL INSPECTORS who recently have descended on a rundown Essex low-income apartment complex saw the obvious: Kingsley Park, which dates back to the 1940s, needs to be torn down and rebuilt. The development's owners, Landex Corp., and Baltimore County agree. But they are so busy blaming one another for Kingsley Park's current and past troubles they cannot figure out how to get rid of the eyesore, which is a hub for drugs and other illegal activity. They need a referee. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski -- who has called on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to rigorously monitor Kingsley Park and who was instrumental in persuading inspectors to investigate complaints about the development -- is tailor-made for that role.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Landex Corp., the company that Baltimore County is pressuring to renovate the dilapidated Kingsley Park Apartments in Essex, has been the target of angry tenants -- and legal action -- resulting from conditions there and at a new Baltimore townhouse complex. At Kingsley Park, residents have formed a tenants association and are planning to place their monthly rents in escrow in hopes of getting repairs made quickly. And last week, at the urging of Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development performed two surprise inspections that found that 34 of 39 apartments did not meet housing standards.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
Kingsley Park, the dreary remnant of World War II-era housing projects on Baltimore County's east side that descended into dilapidated living conditions and a haven of crime, will be redeveloped into a new village of mixed-income housing. In a joint move by the county and federal governments and the corporate owners of the property, officials will let the contract that allows for more than 300 mostly low-income, Section 8 housing residents at Kingsley Park expire Aug. 30. The action will bring down the curtain on the troubled complex, the last outpost for obsolete housing in the county's east-side revitalization district built 60 years ago for defense plant workers.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2003
A "blitz" inspection yesterday by a team of Baltimore County investigators at Kingsley Park apartments - a complex at the center of a redevelopment battle between the county and the landlord - uncovered housing infractions in nearly 150 units and several more serious violations, including raw sewage in basements. Timothy M. Kotroco, county director of Permits and Development Management, said Landex Corp., owner of the Essex complex, will need to address the worst violations within 48 hours.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
Averting a potential court battle, a powerful developer and Baltimore County officials have struck an agreement over the short-term future of the troubled Kingsley Park apartments in Essex. The crafting of a truce between the county and Landex Corp.'s president, Judith S. Siegel, assures the mostly low-income tenants at Kingsley Park of keeping their homes at least through 2003. "A lot of positive things are happening on the east side, and one way or another, we wanted to stop Kingsley Park from negatively impacting the quality of life there," said County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
Averting a potential court battle, a powerful developer and Baltimore County officials have struck an agreement over the short-term future of the troubled Kingsley Park apartments in Essex. The crafting of a truce between the county and Landex Corp.'s president, Judith S. Siegel, assures the mostly low-income tenants at Kingsley Park of keeping their homes at least through 2003. "A lot of positive things are happening on the east side, and one way or another, we wanted to stop Kingsley Park from negatively impacting the quality of life there," said County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2001
Averting a potential court battle, a powerful developer and Baltimore County officials have struck an agreement over the short-term future of the troubled Kingsley Park apartments in Essex. The crafting of a truce between the county and Landex Corp.'s president, Judith S. Siegel, assures the mostly low-income tenants at Kingsley Park of keeping their homes at least through 2003. "A lot of positive things are happening on the east side, and one way or another, we wanted to stop Kingsley Park from negatively impacting the quality of life there," said County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger.
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