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By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Art collectors take note: There's an Andy Warhol about to hit the market. Federal prosecutors in Baltimore have approved the sale of a Liz Taylor print — aptly titled "Liz" — and several other artifacts from the private collection of Barry H. Landau, who's accused of stealing historic documents from museums on both sides of the Atlantic. It's still up to a judge to sign off on the deal, however. Landau's lawyers had asked last month that their client be allowed to liquidate some of his prized assets to pay for "living expenses" — including $2,700 per month in rent for his Manhattan apartment — while he's out on bail awaiting trial in the city's U.S. District Court.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
The Maryland Historical Society can thank document thief Barry H. Landau for some recent additions to its collection. Landau's capture at the Baltimore institution sparked a multistate investigation that ended in his conviction for stealing 10,000 "objects of cultural heritage" from museums and historical societies all along the East Coast. But two years after his guilty plea, federal investigators say they still can't find rightful homes for more than 10 percent of those pieces.
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NEWS
September 9, 2009
Vincent Landau Upon his request he was cremated. Though there will be no funeral, a private memorial service will be held in the future. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Vince's memory to the Kline Hospice House, P.O. Box 1799, Frederick, MD 21702.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2013
They left the Maryland Historical Society tucked inside the coat pockets and notebooks of Barry Landau and his assistant, but the historical documents returned in manila envelopes, neatly packed inside a gray cardboard file box. Authorities continue to reunite more than 10,000 items "of cultural heritage" to museums and libraries along the East Coast that were targeted by Landau and his assistant Jason Savedoff. This month the Maryland Historical Society has received about one-third of 60 documents stolen.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
Los Angeles -- Forget the buzz and speculation about Martin Landau's amazing portrayal of Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton's eccentric film "Ed Wood." Here's the inside skinny -- Mr. Landau will win the Best Supporting Actor Oscar.How do we know? After a lunch of Chinese garlic shrimp, Mr. Landau opens a fortune cookie to behold this promise: "You will receive some high praise or award." "This is hilarious -- I've never gotten one like this before," he says with a laugh -- then he carefully tucks the fortune into his wallet.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
The younger of two men who admitted to stealing a wealth of culturally significant documents was sentenced Friday to a year and a day in federal prison, ending the prosecution of a case that began at the Maryland Historical Society and rattled archives, museums and libraries across the continent. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake said the sentence reflected the valuable cooperation of Jason James Savedoff, 25, in identifying and recovering thousands of stolen items. But it also reflected his participation in the thefts of materials that are part of the nation's history and are worth up to $1 million.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, Steve Kilar and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Barry H. Landau, the once-esteemed collector of presidential memorabilia, admitted in federal court Tuesday that he stole thousands of documents regarded as cultural treasures from historical societies and libraries in Baltimore and up the East Coast. The 63-year-old's guilty plea, to two criminal counts involving theft of artwork, revealed a scheme in which prosecutors said he compiled lists of items to steal by matching names of historical figures, from poets to president, to their "potential monetary value.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Leila Abboud and Leila Abboud,COLUMBIA NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2002
As a child, Terry Landau used to look over her mother's shoulder as she did the daily crossword puzzle in the New York Herald Tribune. By age 15, she was hooked. Today, Landau still does daily puzzles, but quite differently from the way her mother did. Every night about 10, the 52-year-old paralegal logs on to the Internet from her Manhattan apartment to do the next day's puzzle on The New York Times Web site. Using crossword puzzle software, she types her answers into the black-and-white grid on the screen.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
In what has become a bitter divorce case, lawyers for Jim Palmer and his former wife were in Baltimore County Circuit Court yesterday to argue over the amount the ex-Orioles pitcher should pay her for three pieces of the couple's art collection. The pieces, purchased during Palmer's 10-year marriage to Joan H. Palmer, were supposed to be sold at auction in November with 36 paintings, sculptures and other decorative furnishings, with the proceeds to be split between them. Most of the art was sold for $32,000 at the sale, organized by a trustee appointed after Joan Palmer was granted a divorce May 17, 2000.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2011
Barry H. Landau, whom authorities call the mastermind behind a scheme to swipe American treasures from museums throughout the Mid-Atlantic, pleaded not guilty Thursday to federal theft and conspiracy charges that prosecutors now characterize as the country's "single largest" theft of its kind. The suspected victims and the number of items taken have tripled since the investigation began July 9 with an arrest by Baltimore police at the Maryland Historical Society, Assistant U.S. Attorney James Warwick said during the lengthy, multi-part hearing in the city's U.S. District Court.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
The younger of two men who admitted to stealing a wealth of culturally significant documents was sentenced Friday to a year and a day in federal prison, ending the prosecution of a case that began at the Maryland Historical Society and rattled archives, museums and libraries across the continent. U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake said the sentence reflected the valuable cooperation of Jason James Savedoff, 25, in identifying and recovering thousands of stolen items. But it also reflected his participation in the thefts of materials that are part of the nation's history and are worth up to $1 million.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Disgraced collector Barry H. Landau was sentenced Wednesday to seven years in federal prison for stealing thousands of historic documents worth as much as $2.5 million from archives along the East Coast, including one in Baltimore, where the scheme unraveled last summer. The 64-year-old Manhattan resident, who for years fooled celebrities and political players into believing he had significant ties to the White House, was also ordered to pay $46,525 in restitution and to stay away from all archives and libraries after he is released.
NEWS
By Burt Kummerow | February 8, 2012
A sad tale has been unfolding here in Baltimore. From the library of the Maryland Historical Society to the Baltimore City Jail and a federal courtroom, two arrested and accused thieves, guilty by their own admission, are being ushered through the justice system. The story now bouncing around the media has lessons and cautions for all of us. Barry A. Landau pleaded guilty Tuesday to stealing thousands of important historical documents from East Coast libraries and historical societies.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, Steve Kilar and Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Barry H. Landau, the once-esteemed collector of presidential memorabilia, admitted in federal court Tuesday that he stole thousands of documents regarded as cultural treasures from historical societies and libraries in Baltimore and up the East Coast. The 63-year-old's guilty plea, to two criminal counts involving theft of artwork, revealed a scheme in which prosecutors said he compiled lists of items to steal by matching names of historical figures, from poets to president, to their "potential monetary value.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
A collector charged with conspiring to steal valuable historic documents taken from museums in Maryland and several other states is alleging that he was illegally arrested in Baltimore by city officers who lacked enough evidence to place him in custody. Barry H. Landau, a well-known Manhattan collector, argues in papers filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that it was his companion, Jason James Savedoff, who had sole possession of documents police found in a locker at the Maryland Historical Society in July.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
Art collectors take note: There's an Andy Warhol about to hit the market. Federal prosecutors in Baltimore have approved the sale of a Liz Taylor print — aptly titled "Liz" — and several other artifacts from the private collection of Barry H. Landau, who's accused of stealing historic documents from museums on both sides of the Atlantic. It's still up to a judge to sign off on the deal, however. Landau's lawyers had asked last month that their client be allowed to liquidate some of his prized assets to pay for "living expenses" — including $2,700 per month in rent for his Manhattan apartment — while he's out on bail awaiting trial in the city's U.S. District Court.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
A collector charged with conspiring to steal valuable historic documents taken from museums in Maryland and several other states is alleging that he was illegally arrested in Baltimore by city officers who lacked enough evidence to place him in custody. Barry H. Landau, a well-known Manhattan collector, argues in papers filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that it was his companion, Jason James Savedoff, who had sole possession of documents police found in a locker at the Maryland Historical Society in July.
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