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By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
The state Department of General Services has dispatched appraisers to estimate the value of an undeveloped property in Southern Maryland, responding to criticism over a secret deal to sell the state-owned land to a politically connected contractor. The decision to seek a new appraisal comes after Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch wrote to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and other members of the state Board of Public Works asking that the land sale be put on hold because of questions.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 14, 2012
As state and local officials weigh Maryland's first request by any farmer to reclaim development rights voluntarily sold to the state decades ago, preservation advocates and state planners warn that permissive zoning in some rural counties threaten to erode the state's remaining open space. The Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation is holding a public hearing at 6 p.m. Thursday (11/15) at the Howard County Fairgrounds on the requests by a partnership of three county farmers, Mike, Steve and Mark Mullinix, to terminate easements barring development on three farms they operate with a combined 490 acres.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick Sun Staff Writer | July 16, 1994
About 20 members of the Sierra Club took their battle to preserve 163 acres of old-growth forest near Bowie to downtown Baltimore yesterday, where they demonstrated outside Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust Co. headquarters.The hourlong protest was sparked by a preliminary approval for development of the land by the Prince George's Planning Board on June 9, according to Larry Bohlen, conservation chairman for the Potomac Chapter of the national environmental organization. However, the approval was not the final step in opening the land to residential development.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2007
In a sign that the housing downturn is squeezing even the more resilient areas of the Baltimore region, Columbia's master developer said it plans to lower the estimated market value of its remaining, unsold residential lots in the Howard County community. The developer, General Growth Properties Inc., said in a financial filing yesterday that it expects to take a noncash charge of $77 million, not including tax benefits, during the current quarter to write down the market value of residential land for sale in Columbia, two planned communities in Laurel, also in Howard County, and the Fairwood planned community in Prince George's County.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | March 22, 2001
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- In Japan, interest rates are essentially zero, banks won't lend and people won't spend. Years of failed fiscal stimulus have left Japan with an enormous public debt. Now the stagnant economy is rapidly sinking into recession yet again. Household spending in January was lower than the preceding January and machinery orders fell nearly 12 percent in January alone. This is both a challenge and an opportunity for Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan as he charts the U.S. response to what is rapidly becoming a global economic slowdown.
BUSINESS
By James M. Woodard and James M. Woodard,Copley News Service | April 12, 1992
Farmland is becoming a hot investment property in most regions of the country.The popularity of farmland as a potential investment has grown dramatically among pension funds and other institutional investors during the past two years, according to Murray R. Wise, president of Westchester Group, Inc., a farmland marketing consulting and management organization."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby TC and Ted Shelsby TC,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
Bill Knill's cows graze on some of the most expensive pastureland in the country. And according to a federal survey, it's getting more expensive all the time.The price of an average acre of Maryland farmland, including the buildings, jumped 12 percent over the past year, to $2,521, the greatest percentage increase in the continental United States, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture survey.This compared with a gain of 2 percent for the 48 states as a whole, where the average acre of farmland cost $700.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 14, 2012
As state and local officials weigh Maryland's first request by any farmer to reclaim development rights voluntarily sold to the state decades ago, preservation advocates and state planners warn that permissive zoning in some rural counties threaten to erode the state's remaining open space. The Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation is holding a public hearing at 6 p.m. Thursday (11/15) at the Howard County Fairgrounds on the requests by a partnership of three county farmers, Mike, Steve and Mark Mullinix, to terminate easements barring development on three farms they operate with a combined 490 acres.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2007
In a sign that the housing downturn is squeezing even the more resilient areas of the Baltimore region, Columbia's master developer said it plans to lower the estimated market value of its remaining, unsold residential lots in the Howard County community. The developer, General Growth Properties Inc., said in a financial filing yesterday that it expects to take a noncash charge of $77 million, not including tax benefits, during the current quarter to write down the market value of residential land for sale in Columbia, two planned communities in Laurel, also in Howard County, and the Fairwood planned community in Prince George's County.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1999
They are officially located in Columbia, but Peter Butziger and 24 of his neighbors are demanding an address that befits the pastoral setting for their expensive homes -- Clarksville.All 25 homeowners in the Pointers Overlook community -- an upscale subdivision on the border between Clarksville and Columbia -- contend that since the Postal Service affixed a Columbia address to them, their property values have dropped, their bills have been delayed or lost, and police and rescue personnel cannot find them.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN REPORTER | January 30, 2006
WENONA -- Let's face it, hardly anyone here in Maryland's remote southern reaches ever thought they'd be talking $6 million - not for a scruffy watermen's marina with 13 acres of marsh, crab shanties and rickety docks overlooking the commercial harbor. Now, with the sale final for the asking price and rumors churning about how the waterfront will be developed, folks all over Deal Island and in nearby Chance seem to have one only question in mind - "How much is my place worth?" Many who scoffed at the prospects for a windfall here, cynics who called it pie-in-the-sky, are quickly changing their tune - and scrambling to calculate riches they never knew they had. And who can blame them?
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
The state Department of General Services has dispatched appraisers to estimate the value of an undeveloped property in Southern Maryland, responding to criticism over a secret deal to sell the state-owned land to a politically connected contractor. The decision to seek a new appraisal comes after Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch wrote to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and other members of the state Board of Public Works asking that the land sale be put on hold because of questions.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Rose Madison, who has lived in the same place for 41 years, must start over soon at age 64. The land is being pulled from underneath her house. It is an increasingly common story in Maryland, where mobile-home parks are being converted to more immediately profitable developments, from stores to upscale subdivisions. Manufactured housing is very often the most affordable way to live in this expensive state, but there are fewer and fewer places to put it. Rising land values encourage different uses.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
If Maryland is to close an institution for the developmentally disabled, the Rosewood Center in Owings Mills should be the one, the state health department says in a report released yesterday. But closing any institution is too costly an undertaking in the state's current fiscal climate, according to Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene pointed to the $7.5 million, first-year cost of closing Rosewood in recommending at least a temporary reprieve for the facility.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2002
The national economy may be struggling, but property values in Maryland are rising faster than they have in more than a decade - led by startlingly higher prices in Ocean City. Annual assessment notices were mailed yesterday to 692,000 property owners statewide, and all show healthy increases from three years ago - the last time these same places were re-valued. Maryland physically inspects one-third of the state's properties each year, and phases in the change over a three year period.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2002
In long-settled sections of eastern Howard County, expensive new homes are filling spare spaces as soaring real estate prices - with taxes to match - are pressuring suburbanites to sell any extra acres that surround their older homes. "People are literally selling their back yards to put a house in," said Mary Catherine Cochran, president of Preservation Howard County. The lovely landscape along Old Columbia Pike as it approaches historic Ellicott City, for instance, is filling up - to the consternation of some and the profit of others.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
For all practical purposes, Howard County has $8 million in hand to buy the 300-acre Smith Farm in Columbia. The problem is that no one knows how much the land is worth, or even if it is for sale.Yesterday, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced the commitment of $4 million in state money to purchase the farm along Route 175. The state's money will come from program open space funds. The money will be matched by $4 million that County Executive Charles I. Ecker has said the county will pay for buying the land and turning it into a park.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Evening Sun Staff Sarris and Larry Carson contributed to this story | November 21, 1990
The door to Harry Weinberg's Baltimore real estate empire is sandwiched between the Hair Styling Junction and the 40 West Auto Supply in a little shopping center on Baltimore National Pike.Up stairs covered with worn red linoleum and past dusty file cabinets full of bank statements from the now defunct Brager-Gutman department store is the office, decorated with mismatched furniture, from which Weinberg's multimillion-dollar Baltimore real estate holdings were managed.Weinberg died Nov. 4 of cancer, leaving a $900 million charitable trust -- the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation -- to give away a projected $45 million each year to the poor.
NEWS
By David H. Feldman | March 22, 2001
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- In Japan, interest rates are essentially zero, banks won't lend and people won't spend. Years of failed fiscal stimulus have left Japan with an enormous public debt. Now the stagnant economy is rapidly sinking into recession yet again. Household spending in January was lower than the preceding January and machinery orders fell nearly 12 percent in January alone. This is both a challenge and an opportunity for Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan as he charts the U.S. response to what is rapidly becoming a global economic slowdown.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2000
A consensus may be developing on one of Howard County's thorniest school expansion problems - how to add 400 seats at Glenelg High School without overwhelming the marginal septic system. County Councilman Allan H. Kittleman, a Republican who represents the western area where the school is, said in a recent letter to the school board that he favors building a small wastewater treatment plant at the high school - an option rejected last fall by school officials but getting a long second look.
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