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By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | December 18, 1994
An article in the Dec. 18 Sunday Sun about title insurance agents reported incorrectly that William Hackney, a former lawyer in Glen Burnie, was convicted of stealing client money from an escrow account. In fact, earlier this year, in a civil proceeding in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, Mr. Hackney signed a confessed judgment in which he acknowledged responsibility for $450,000 found missing from his title company's escrow account.The Sun regrets the errors.Joseph E. Goldberg Sr. raced off in his Ford Explorer Oct. 14 and hasn't been seen since.
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SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2004
The Atlantic Coast Conference will hold its first football championship game in Jacksonville, Fla., the league announced yesterday. The city beat out six others for the honor, including Baltimore, which was considered a long shot to land the game. ACC faculty representatives unanimously chose Jacksonville over Charlotte, N.C., Miami, Orlando, Fla., Baltimore, Tampa, Fla., and Washington in a conference call Wednesday. The agreement calls for Jacksonville to host the game in 2005 and 2006, with the league holding an option to keep the game there in 2007 and 2008.
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NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
In a highly unusual action, the state insurance commissioner has shut down an Ellicott City settlement company after investigators determined that at least $500,000 in mortgage money was missing from company accounts.In addition, a federal judge has ordered the bank accounts of the company, Land Title Research of Maryland, and its president, Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., frozen so that investigators can unravel the company's financial records."It's a lot of money to be missing," said Joy Hatchette, an assistant attorney general who represents the Maryland Insurance Administration.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | December 20, 1998
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -- Fifteen minutes after the New York Jets' historic victory yesterday over the Buffalo Bills -- a division-clinching win that took 29 years to script -- Bill Parcells stood before his delirious players and started to deliver the speech his nine predecessors never got to make.Just one problem: Parcells -- the big, bad and brilliant coach who rescued the Jets from oblivion two years ago -- couldn't get the words out. He choked up, pausing for almost two minutes. The awkward and emotional silence caused many players to fight back their own tears.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1997
The former employee of an Ellicott City property title agency pleaded guilty in Howard Circuit Court yesterday to charges she helped her boss cover up the loss of $1 million he allegedly stole and misappropriated from his clients.Patricia Horak, an Elkridge resident, worked for Joseph E. Goldberg Sr. at Land Title Research of Maryland Inc. as an office manager for 12 years. Yesterday, she pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit theft for her role in what state insurance officials have called one of the largest insurance fraud cases in Maryland history.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | November 3, 1994
In a highly unusual action, the state insurance commissioner has shut down an Ellicott City settlement company after investigators determined that at least $500,000 in mortgage money was missing from company accounts.In addition, a federal judge has ordered the bank accounts of the company, Land Title Research of Maryland, and its president, Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., frozen so that investigators can unravel the company's financial records."It's a lot of money to be missing," said Joy Hatchette, an assistant attorney general who represents the Maryland Insurance Administration.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
A former Ellicott City property title insurance agent was charged yesterday with stealing and misappropriating more than million entrusted to his business by clients, one of the largest insurance fraud schemes in Maryland history.An eight-count grand jury indictment also charges Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., 43, with filing a false Maryland income tax return in 1992 and not filing state tax returns in 1993 and 1994.Michael DiPietro, an assistant attorney general for the Maryland Insurance Commission, called the case "one of the largest insurance theft and fraud cases ever" in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1995
After a year of dissecting a maze of banking and other records, Baltimore attorney James Gordon says he has determined that the head of an Ellicott City settlement company diverted at least $897,000 of his customers' money from escrow accounts before his firm was seized by regulators in October 1994.What's more, at least one major title insurance company knew a year earlier that Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., president of Land Title Research of Maryland, was months behind in recording vital documents, according to letters unearthed by Mr. Gordon, who was appointed by the state Insurance Commissioner to unravel the mess.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1996
A former Ellicott City property title insurance agent, who is under criminal investigation by the state, has filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against 17 people, including federal law enforcement agents and former business associates, alleging that they conspired against him after his firm was seized by state regulators two years ago.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by Joseph E. Goldberg Sr. of Elkridge, seeks a total of more than $180...
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | April 21, 1995
Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., under state investigation for $2.3 million missing from his now-defunct settlement company and on the run from creditors, has emerged long enough to file a suit accusing his estranged wife and seven of her relatives of theft.Among the items he claims they stole from his houses in Howard County and Western Maryland: an in-ground pool, a Jacuzzi, AK-47 rifles and 4,000 rounds of ammunition.Mr. Goldberg, 41, contends in the suit that he has "lost the quiet, comfort, solace and enjoyment of his property" and as a result now suffers from "severe depression."
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,SUN FASHION EDITOR | October 15, 1998
When is a skirt not just a skirt?When Ally McBeal wears it.Then it symbolizes many things: Feminism run amok. Bad fashion. Unbridled sexuality. Anorexia.Her minis -- which have crept up an inch this season -- take center stage on "Ally McBeal" on Monday (Fox, 9 p.m.) when the title character's penchant for thigh-high style lands her in contempt of court.But it's not just Ally's apparel that gets fans, critics and TV judges talking. The very existence of this strange single lawyer -- and her offbeat world of unisex bathrooms, dancing babies and colleagues nicknamed Biscuit -- seems to stimulate, aggravate, entertain and inspire.
NEWS
August 22, 1997
JUST BECAUSE the criminal justice system catches, convicts and sentences a swindler does not necessarily mean the thief's victims will be compensated.People can spend years filing lawsuits, obtaining court judgments and trying to collect, and still not get everything -- or anything -- owed them. Sometimes, the money disappears; often it is impossible to find.That is why it is hard for victims to get much satisfaction when someone admits in court to stealing money from them, particularly when the thefts come at vulnerable times.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
Keith Himebaugh lost his lakefront home. Linda Ayres lost the money she wanted for a new car. And Jeffrey Applebaum, who lost $18,000, is so distraught he can't even bring himself to talk about it.These people were among dozens of customers and business partners of former Ellicott City title agent Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., who admitted swindling $1 million in real estate settlement funds. State prosecutors said it was one of the largest schemes of its kind in Maryland history.Now, three years after Goldberg's company, Land Title Research of Maryland, was seized by the state and one month after Goldberg pleaded guilty to theft in Howard County Circuit Court, the case is still not over for many people.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1997
A headline in some editions of The Sun yesterday improperly identified prosecutors seeking a jail sentence for convicted embezzler Joseph E. Goldberg Sr. The prosecutors were from the state attorney general's office. Also, the crime was 'u investigated by the Insurance Fraud Division of the Maryland Insurance Administration, along with the Criminal Investigation Division of the attorney general's office.The Sun regrets the errors.A former Ellicott City property title agent pleaded guilty yesterday to stealing nearly $1 million in what state prosecutors said was one of the largest scams of its kind in Maryland history.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1997
The trial of the Ellicott City title agent accused of taking more than $1.1 million from his clients has been postponed because the agent, Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., says he cannot afford his private attorney.Goldberg was to stand trial tomorrow on charges he stole or misappropriated money entrusted to his business in what is alleged to be one of the largest insurance fraud schemes in Maryland history.But in a recent hearing in Howard County Circuit Court, Goldberg asked to be represented by a public defender because he does not have the money to hire his own.A motion filed by his former attorney, Michael A. Zwaig, says representing Goldberg without adequate compensation would put extreme financial hardship on Zwaig's Towson law practice.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1997
The former employee of an Ellicott City property title agency pleaded guilty in Howard Circuit Court yesterday to charges she helped her boss cover up the loss of $1 million he allegedly stole and misappropriated from his clients.Patricia Horak, an Elkridge resident, worked for Joseph E. Goldberg Sr. at Land Title Research of Maryland Inc. as an office manager for 12 years. Yesterday, she pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit theft for her role in what state insurance officials have called one of the largest insurance fraud cases in Maryland history.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
Keith Himebaugh lost his lakefront home. Linda Ayres lost the money she wanted for a new car. And Jeffrey Applebaum, who lost $18,000, is so distraught he can't even bring himself to talk about it.These people were among dozens of customers and business partners of former Ellicott City title agent Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., who admitted swindling $1 million in real estate settlement funds. State prosecutors said it was one of the largest schemes of its kind in Maryland history.Now, three years after Goldberg's company, Land Title Research of Maryland, was seized by the state and one month after Goldberg pleaded guilty to theft in Howard County Circuit Court, the case is still not over for many people.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
A former Ellicott City property title insurance agent was charged yesterday with stealing and misappropriating more than million entrusted to his business by clients, one of the largest insurance fraud schemes in Maryland history.An eight-count grand jury indictment also charges Joseph E. Goldberg Sr., 43, with filing a false Maryland income tax return in 1992 and not filing state tax returns in 1993 and 1994.Michael DiPietro, an assistant attorney general for the Maryland Insurance Commission, called the case "one of the largest insurance theft and fraud cases ever" in Maryland.
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