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Land Dispute

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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Johns Hopkins University won another legal victory Thursday in its attempt to build a research park on farmland previously owned by a woman whose family sued the school, saying she would have opposed the development. A three-judge panel of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals affirmed a Montgomery County Circuit Court's decision that Hopkins's plan to develop the 138-acre Belward Farm complied with the agreement made with Elizabeth Banks in 1989. Banks had sold the land, which had been in her family for more than 100 years, to Hopkins for $5 million, a fraction of its market value.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Johns Hopkins University won another legal victory Thursday in its attempt to build a research park on farmland previously owned by a woman whose family sued the school, saying she would have opposed the development. A three-judge panel of the Maryland Court of Special Appeals affirmed a Montgomery County Circuit Court's decision that Hopkins's plan to develop the 138-acre Belward Farm complied with the agreement made with Elizabeth Banks in 1989. Banks had sold the land, which had been in her family for more than 100 years, to Hopkins for $5 million, a fraction of its market value.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The plaintiffs in a high-profile land dispute with Johns Hopkins University filed for summary judgment in their case against the university on Tuesday, one day after JHU filed a similar motion. The lawsuit was originally filed in November by family members of Elizabeth Beall Newell, who along with her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm near Gaithersburg to JHU in 1989 for $5 million. The sale, of land the family said was valued at $54 million, came with certain stipulations, including that the land be used for research or education purposes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The plaintiffs in a high-profile land dispute with Johns Hopkins University filed for summary judgment in their case against the university on Tuesday, one day after JHU filed a similar motion. The lawsuit was originally filed in November by family members of Elizabeth Beall Newell, who along with her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm near Gaithersburg to JHU in 1989 for $5 million. The sale, of land the family said was valued at $54 million, came with certain stipulations, including that the land be used for research or education purposes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Attorneys for the Johns Hopkins University on Monday filed a motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit claiming the university is violating a land-use agreement it signed with a Montgomery County family more than 20 years ago. Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm to the university in 1989 under specific stipulations, including that the property be used for research or education purposes. The suit, led by Banks' nephew John Timothy Newell, claims Hopkins' plans to construct high-rise buildings on the land violate the agreement and are out of line with what Banks and her siblings were told would be a low-rise campus.
NEWS
By Hugh Dellios and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 2, 2003
SAN PABLO ETLA, Mexico - In 1959, when they were middle-aged newlyweds, Russell and Jean Ames came to Mexico and built their home in the Oaxaca Valley. In a gesture of charity, they deeded the land to a local university with the understanding that they could live there until they died. Now, 44 years later, Russell Ames, at 91 a frail widower, has been threatened with eviction, and three of his American friends have been jailed in a nasty dispute with the university, which is trying to force Ames off the land.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Evening Sun Staff | April 16, 1991
The consumer protection division of the Maryland attorney general's office is trying to mediate a dispute between the developer of an Anne Arundel County retirement community and a group of its residents.About 300 of the 1,100 residents of Heritage Harbour, near South River, have asked the attorney general's office to look intoalleged wrongdoing by the community's developer, U.S. Home Corp.Among other things, residents claim U.S. Home Corp. sold to other developers land that had been set aside as community common space.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
The Annapolis city council was drawn last night into a feud over a piece of land that has divided a small community in Eastport and left many residents there wondering about the value of their property and their rights as landowners.The debate occupied the aldermen for several hours and upstaged consideration of the city's capital improvement budget, which late last night still had not made it to the floor for consideration.Instead, the aldermen were considering a land war between the Henson family and the Ambridge housing complex.
NEWS
November 7, 1997
EVEN GROWN MEN turn into softies in the steamy temperatures of a sauna. Add the ancient custom of bathers beating one another with birch twigs and you can understand what happened to Russian leader Boris N. Yeltsin and Japanese leader Ryutaro Hashimoto at their recent summit.Their informal, Siberian "no-neckties" summit worked. The two men ignored a land dispute that has long prevented normalization of relations. They now hope to sign a belated World War II peace treaty by 2000."This is a major breakthrough in relations," Mr. Yeltsin enthused.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
A squabble over the purchase of a farm near Glyndon has led to the eviction of an influential Baltimore County land preservation group from its offices, amid accusations by a local real estate agent that the group is guilty of a breach of trust.The Valleys Planning Council was told to vacate its work space of 30 years at 212 Washington Ave. after Henry F. LeBrun, whose wife owns the building, said the group had "lost its credibility" -- a charge based on incidents involving two deals LeBrun was brokering.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2012
Attorneys for the Johns Hopkins University on Monday filed a motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit claiming the university is violating a land-use agreement it signed with a Montgomery County family more than 20 years ago. Elizabeth Beall Banks and her siblings sold 108 acres of their family's Belward Farm to the university in 1989 under specific stipulations, including that the property be used for research or education purposes. The suit, led by Banks' nephew John Timothy Newell, claims Hopkins' plans to construct high-rise buildings on the land violate the agreement and are out of line with what Banks and her siblings were told would be a low-rise campus.
NEWS
December 15, 2008
A piece of Baltimore Country Club history was demolished last week: the tennis clubhouse that served four grass courts that were built in 1903. Over the years, it was home to local tennis champions and even hosted the occasional star, including Pancho Gonzalez and Billie Jean King. Phil Spevak heard about the demolition hours after it occurred Tuesday, though he had met that morning with club leaders. It's not surprising. Mr. Spevak is the president of the Roland Park Civic League, which has masterfully rallied the neighborhood against the club's sale of 17 acres for a proposed continuing care retirement community.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
Ann Mech and Randy Nixon have many similarities. They are devoted to the land, widely respected, selfless, thoughtful and abstain from extreme positions. But the controversy over efforts to preserve farmland by imposing tighter restrictions on development in Western Howard County has created a chasm between the two. Mech sees those efforts as necessary tinkering, while Nixon views them as a challenge to sovereignty and property rights. The gap between them, though, is an emblem of the fissure on the citizens committee attempting to fashion a delicate compromise to foster conservation without financially harming large property owners and the homebuilding industry.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
Vitali Klitschko, concerned about the political unrest in his native Ukraine, nearly backed out of tonight's heavyweight title bout with Danny Williams. However, at the urging of one of the principals in the disputed election, Klitschko will be in Las Vegas, putting his World Boxing Council title on the line against the British fighter. Klitschko told London's Guardian he received a supportive call from opposition leader Viktor A. Yushchenko, asking him not to put off the bout. "Wladimir [Klitschko, Vitali's brother and fellow heavyweight]
NEWS
By Hugh Dellios and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 2, 2003
SAN PABLO ETLA, Mexico - In 1959, when they were middle-aged newlyweds, Russell and Jean Ames came to Mexico and built their home in the Oaxaca Valley. In a gesture of charity, they deeded the land to a local university with the understanding that they could live there until they died. Now, 44 years later, Russell Ames, at 91 a frail widower, has been threatened with eviction, and three of his American friends have been jailed in a nasty dispute with the university, which is trying to force Ames off the land.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2003
Construction of a hotly contested extension of the Grist Mill Trail in Patapsco Valley State Park to Howard County will resume soon, Department of Natural Resources officials said yesterday, despite continuing concerns about ownership of a portion of the trail by CSX, which operates a rail line in the area. Work on the trail was suspended last winter because of weather concerns. In February, local representatives of CSX told DNR officials that they believed a portion of the trail along the Patapsco River was planned for property that belonged to the railroad.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
A prominent developer with a history of disputes with Anne Arundel County filed a $50 million class-action lawsuit this week, alleging that four county government administrations have wrongly exacted land and money from developers in exchange for approving their subdivisions. Silver Spring-based Halle Development Inc. is claiming that the county's decade-old practice of issuing waivers to its law that mandates adequate school capacity in exchange for developer contributions toward new schools is unconstitutional and banned by county law. The lawsuit was filed Tuesday in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, with a companion case in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | December 25, 1994
Washington -- Gaston Roberge's quiet $338,000 Christmas-season real estate settlement with Uncle Sam should spread cheer -- and hope -- to thousands of property owners involved in regulatory disputes with government agencies across the country.Eighty-one years old, blind in one eye and a victim of several heart attacks, Roberge stood his ground and in mid-December got the Justice Department to do what legal experts say it's never done before: agree to pay big bucks for a "temporary regulatory taking" of a citizen's free use of his real estate.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2002
In the latest ruling favoring property owners, the state's highest court said yesterday that a landowner cannot be faulted for creating his or her own land-use problem -- and be denied use of the land because of it -- when the landowner has done what local officials found appropriate in complying with zoning laws. The 5-2 decision by the Maryland Court of Appeals centers on an odd-shaped, 1.5-acre waterfront lot outside Annapolis. Owner Nancy R. Stansbury began the process of seeking building approval for the lot on Pleasant Lake about six years ago and ended up in court when neighbors protested.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 29, 2002
MOSCOW - President Vladimir V. Putin said yesterday that he is granting the Russian military expanded powers to fight terrorism and is prepared to follow in the footsteps of the United States by striking at threats beyond its borders. Putin's remarks to his Cabinet came as Russians soberly reassessed the raid led by counterterrorism troops Saturday to free hundreds of hostages held by Chechen guerrillas in a Moscow theater. Officials acknowledged that all but one of the 117 hostages killed in the raid died from the effects of a debilitating gas pumped into the theater.
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