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NEWS
By Aminah Franklin and Aminah Franklin,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
Buildings could rise to new heights -- four stories -- in a heavily developed section of Bel Air under a measure before town lawmakers.Private developers could erect four-story buildings rising as high as 50 feet for the first time if the Bel Air town commissioners approve an amendment to a land development ordinance.The amendment, to be introduced tomorrow night, covers a 126-acre tract about a mile from downtown that Bel Air annexed in 1990. The tract includes Bel Air Town Center, Bel Air Plaza, Tollgate Mall, Harford Mall and 82 acres owned by Bel Air Land Development Partnerships, a group of investors.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
Anne Arundel County officials took a second major step yesterday in their overhaul of local land-use laws, releasing proposed rule changes that they say would streamline the approval process for residential and commercial developments. The changes, coupled with revisions to the zoning code released this year, are designed to simplify laws known in the building community for their unclear and sometimes contradictory language. "A clear statement of the development standards and a predictable process is essential for an efficient and effective planning operation," said Joseph W. Rutter Jr., the county's planning and zoning officer.
NEWS
By RONALD M. SZCZYBOR | October 23, 1994
The candidates for Harford County executive on the Nov. 8 ballot, Democrat Eileen M. Rehrmann and Republican Ronald M. Szczybor, were asked to respond to the following questions: How should growth be managed by county government, with respect to public facilities, zoning and land use decisions, and incentives to developers/businesses? What type of development is needed and how should it be achieved? Does development growth cost more than it brings to the county, and how to reconcile any such disparity?
EXPLORE
January 23, 2012
As one who was told, by name, to "shut up and listen" by a fellow resident at the recent pre-submission meeting concerning GGP's plans for the mall, I feel compelled to comment on three portions of your article, "Mall plans draw tepid response" (Jan. 19). One: You claim that residents were "unconvinced at first that (GGP's) hands were tied" in terms of sharing more information about their plans. Actually, we continue to be unconvinced. Contrary to GGP's assertion, the county's development approval process clearly allows them to share whatever additional information they want to share about their plans.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | June 2, 1991
Bel Air administrators fear development could be stymied for more than a year because the state has extended a moratorium on sewer hook-ups south and west of Main Street until a key sewage pumping station is expanded.The state's decision means BTR Realty won't be able tomove ahead with plans to expand the Hecht department store in Harford Mall until the fall of 1992, county officials say.Other projects that may be delayed include:* Hill Management's proposal to double the size of Bel Air Plaza on U.S. 1.* Bel Air Land Development Limited Partnership's MacPhail Crossing East, a retail plaza planned for a site on Route 24.* Harford Land Management's construction of the remaining 175 units in English Country Manor, an apartment and condominium complex just behind the Harford Mall along U.S. Business 1.Carol Deibel, Bel Air's planning director, said the state's decision "puts us in a real bind."
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
Pikesville company bags Governor's RunA Pikesville land development firm took the prize at Friday's auction of Governor's Run, bidding $5.1 million for the 150-acre tract along U.S. 40 in Ellicott City, land that Howard County has approved for construction of 183 homes.Elkridge Plaza Inc., an affiliate of Greenebaum & Rose Inc., hopes to cash in on the fact that the real estate slump and credit squeeze stopped land development in its tracks during 1991 and 1992. Those problems have led to another: a shortage of lots.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2003
As they prepare for public hearings next month on Howard County's once-a-decade comprehensive rezoning, four County Council members released lists of their political campaign contributors, some of whom have rezoning requests pending. The council members released their fund-raising lists after requests by The Sun. All the members defended their right to raise money for future political campaigns even as they ponder the future of sometimes-sensitive parcels of county land, raising an ethical question for some.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
The Howard County Planning Board has voted against funding the purchase of land to build a road that would serve a proposed mixed-use development in Clarksville, a potential setback for the county-backed project, which has struggled to secure highway access. About 150 people, including landowners in the area surrounding the former Gateway School site, showed up to a Thursday hearing in support of Kendall Hardware, which has been a vocal critic of a plan that county officials believe can breathe life into the stalled Clarksville Commons development on the county-owned land.
NEWS
January 7, 2006
Fall of city forest won't end the fight The loss of Woodberry forest to Loyola College is another sad chapter of a pornographic book of city politics and land development ("Fight for woods draws to a close," Dec. 30). The heroes are those who don't give up the fight, even when the odds are against them. But with elected officials pretending to care and mainstream environmental groups in Baltimore afraid to take on their Democratic Party patrons, it is no wonder that Woodberry and the woods will be the loser.
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