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By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley's broad strategy to revamp land development rules across Maryland met harsh criticism Friday, as local officials worried that the governor's proposal would interfere with their ability to plan and pay for schools, roads and housing. In a discussion with local leaders at a Maryland Association of Counties conference, the Democratic governor sought to sell his new program, which has been in the works for three years. He said it would protect farms and woodlands, and would designate targeted growth areas - saving the state billions by concentrating development in areas already served by roads, sewers and other infrastructure.
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NEWS
Aegis staff report | January 17, 2014
Stephen Gorski, has joined Duffield Associates' Civil Engineering and Water Resources Department as a senior project manager. He has more than 25 years of experience in civil engineering design, management and construction for a variety of large and complex civil engineering and land development projects throughout the mid-Atlantic region. Gorski graduated from the University of Delaware with bachelor's degrees in civil engineering and geology. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Society of American Military Engineers, the Homebuilders Association, as well as other professional organizations.
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NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | September 4, 2007
Karen Gulczynski wants to build a second house on her 2 acres in Essex for her daughter and future son-in-law. There's one hitch: Baltimore County zoning rules won't let her. "I could put a golf course back there. I could put a rec center back there, a small church," said Gulczynski, a bus attendant for Baltimore County public schools. "I could put anything back there but a home." Beginning Tuesday, Gulczynski and anyone else in Baltimore County will be able to ask their elected officials to change the rules covering what can be built on a particular piece of property.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 3, 2013
Baltimore City has awarded "an exclusive negotiating privilege" to an urban farming collective to buy two vacant, city-owned lots near a community garden in Hampden. The collective, Baltimore Free Farm, is trying to buy the lots to prevent their development. The group was one of two bidders for the lots last month; the other is a developer, who has expressed interest in building housing on both lots, according to Baltimore Housing, which is selling the lots through its Vacants to Value program to encourage re-investment in properties in the city that suffer from neglect, abandonment and blight.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
Erin McKelvey enjoys the open space of Dayton, a small western Howard County town with rolling hills and cattle farms. Disparaging remarks about country life don't bother her."I'm perfectly satisfied," McKelvey says. "My friends say I live in the boondocks. And I say, 'Damn straight.' "McKelvey was among 300 people who attended a public hearing at Glenelg High School on Wednesday to oppose plans to radically restructure land development in western Howard County.Residents of such small towns as Lisbon, West Friendship and Clarksville urged a county-appointed commission on rural land use to reject proposals to channel development into villages or small, clustered areas.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
After decades of paving streets and parking lots, Genstar Stone Products Co. is paving the way for its first ventures into land development.And the Hunt Valley-based company, which owns 3,000 acres in Maryland and some of the largest parcels of undeveloped business property in Baltimore County, is poised to become one of the region's largest land developers."
NEWS
By Dan Harsha and Dan Harsha,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
Exxon Land Development has donated to the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center an environmentally sensitive parcel of land in Edgewater, adjacent to the sprawling South River county school complex. The 96-acre tract, bounded by Route 214 and Muddy Creek Road, contains the headwaters of Glebe Creek, a tributary of the South River, said Anson Hines, assistant director of SERC. The land has been used by SERC for several years to observe migrant bird populations. "It's a very interesting parcel which has a diverse array of species," Hines said.
EXPLORE
January 28, 2013
Lynn Davis has been hired as a senior project manager for Harford-based Ecotone Inc., an ecological design build firm. Davis will be developing and managing Ecotone's environmental credit market services in the Mid-Atlantic region. Davis spent the last 14 years in the land development industry. As director of land development for Bob Ward Companies, and previously for Michael T. Rose Companies, she was responsible for managing all phases of residential development from planning and engineering through construction and final bond release.
NEWS
November 4, 2002
HRD's Forester wins a Lifetime Achievement Award The Home Builders Association of Maryland announced the winners of its Land Development Council Award of Excellence at a ceremony in Baltimore on Oct. 16. The award recognizes excellence in design and quality, and honors outstanding contributions to the land development industry. Howard County winners included David E. Forester, senior vice president and senior development director of Howard Research and Development Corp., an affiliate of the Rouse Co. Forester, who retired Sept.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
County ethics law should be tougher I was pleased to read in a recent article ("Call Renewed on Ethics," The Sun, Nov. 16) that some Anne Arundel County Council members are calling for strengthening the county's ethics laws. The issue was raised because Joseph W. Rutter Jr., until last December the county's top planning official, is now both a development company executive and a paid consultant on the county's once-in-a-decade General Development Plan update. As a consultant to the county department he once headed, Mr. Rutter will assist with the analysis of land development and use plans.
EXPLORE
January 28, 2013
Lynn Davis has been hired as a senior project manager for Harford-based Ecotone Inc., an ecological design build firm. Davis will be developing and managing Ecotone's environmental credit market services in the Mid-Atlantic region. Davis spent the last 14 years in the land development industry. As director of land development for Bob Ward Companies, and previously for Michael T. Rose Companies, she was responsible for managing all phases of residential development from planning and engineering through construction and final bond release.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Dundalk residents plan to rally Saturday afternoon to protest a Baltimore County plan to close the North Point Government Center and reorganize schools in the area. A protest is scheduled from noon to 2 p.m. at the intersection outside the center, which is located on Wise Avenue. County Executive Kevin Kamenetz has proposed selling three government properties, including the North Point center, for private development. Opponents of the plan in Dundalk say it would leave various community organizations that use the center and its recreational fields with nowhere to go. Also, the county's plan would require the police precinct now located at the government center to move to Eastwood Elementary, requiring the students there to relocate.
NEWS
May 28, 2012
A developer claims he would be "protecting the land" by building up to 400 houses in conservation land near Bird River ("Battle lines form over site near bay" May 25). He must use the same logic as the Vietnam War officer who explained that it was "necessary to destroy the village in order to save it. " Chris Yoder, Baltimore The author is chair of the Greater Baltimore Group of the Sierra Club.
NEWS
May 7, 2012
Why do politicians continue to take money and favors from developers and others? ("Kamenetz, council members got tickets from developers," May 2). Don't they realize how this looks and that favors are expected in return? One of the attorneys who represents a large land development corporation gave Orioles tickets to a Baltimore County councilman who has much influence on whether or not a big development gets cut back or not. A councilwoman, who got $732 worth of tickets says, "It was a nice treat for members of my family.
EXPLORE
January 23, 2012
As one who was told, by name, to "shut up and listen" by a fellow resident at the recent pre-submission meeting concerning GGP's plans for the mall, I feel compelled to comment on three portions of your article, "Mall plans draw tepid response" (Jan. 19). One: You claim that residents were "unconvinced at first that (GGP's) hands were tied" in terms of sharing more information about their plans. Actually, we continue to be unconvinced. Contrary to GGP's assertion, the county's development approval process clearly allows them to share whatever additional information they want to share about their plans.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley's broad strategy to revamp land development rules across Maryland met harsh criticism Friday, as local officials worried that the governor's proposal would interfere with their ability to plan and pay for schools, roads and housing. In a discussion with local leaders at a Maryland Association of Counties conference, the Democratic governor sought to sell his new program, which has been in the works for three years. He said it would protect farms and woodlands, and would designate targeted growth areas - saving the state billions by concentrating development in areas already served by roads, sewers and other infrastructure.
NEWS
By Dan Harsha and Dan Harsha,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2003
Exxon Land Development has donated to the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center an environmentally sensitive parcel of land in Edgewater, adjacent to the sprawling county school complex in South River. The 96-acre tract, bounded by Route 214 and Muddy Creek Road, contains the headwaters of Glebe Creek, a tributary of the South River, said Anson Hines, assistant director of SERC. The land has been used by SERC for several years to observe migrant bird populations. "It's a very interesting parcel which has a diverse array of species," Hines said.
NEWS
Aegis staff report | January 17, 2014
Stephen Gorski, has joined Duffield Associates' Civil Engineering and Water Resources Department as a senior project manager. He has more than 25 years of experience in civil engineering design, management and construction for a variety of large and complex civil engineering and land development projects throughout the mid-Atlantic region. Gorski graduated from the University of Delaware with bachelor's degrees in civil engineering and geology. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Society of American Military Engineers, the Homebuilders Association, as well as other professional organizations.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
The Howard County Planning Board has voted against funding the purchase of land to build a road that would serve a proposed mixed-use development in Clarksville, a potential setback for the county-backed project, which has struggled to secure highway access. About 150 people, including landowners in the area surrounding the former Gateway School site, showed up to a Thursday hearing in support of Kendall Hardware, which has been a vocal critic of a plan that county officials believe can breathe life into the stalled Clarksville Commons development on the county-owned land.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | May 30, 2009
With the dismissal of some charges in the City Hall corruption cases this week, the person left taking the biggest hit is someone who never has sought or held political office: Ronald H. Lipscomb. The state prosecutor's bribery case against the developer is the only one that remains fully intact after a judge on Thursday tossed out all charges against Helen L. Holton, the city councilwoman accused of accepting a bribe from Lipscomb. Also dismissed were five charges brought against Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon after a three-year investigation into City Hall spending practices, but seven others were allowed to stand.
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