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NEWS
November 13, 2004
On November 6, 2004, LANCE PRELLER, age 53, a native of Baltimore, MD passed suddenly at his home in Great Barrier Island, New Zealand. We all remember Lance for his love of family, friends, nature and his worldly travels. Son of Larry Preller and the late Marie Preller; step-son of Doris Preller and survived by the love of his life, Joan Lazzati and his six siblings, Deborah Gelin, Rita Preller, Lauren Preller Lein, Joseph Preller, Adam Preller, Patrick Preller and many relatives and friends.
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SPORTS
By Marissa Laliberte and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
LEONARDTOWN -- "The rings are hung; the track is clear. Charge, fair maiden. " Upon the announcer's command, Mikayla Miller of St. Leonard, aboard the horse Tyke, raced down an 80-foot jousting course, lance in hand. Covering the distance in less than 9 seconds and keeping her arm and upper body as still as possible, she rode through three arches and speared the half-inch ring hanging from each of them. Competing at the St. Mary's County Fair Joust tournament last weekend, the semiprofessional rider performed well enough to qualify at that level for the state championship next Saturday in Crownsville.
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NEWS
November 27, 2005
On November 25, 2005 HELEN FRANCES LANCE (nee Locaty); beloved wife of the late Robert R. Lance Sr. Loving mother of Robert R. Lance Jr. Services private. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to St. Agnes Hospice, 3421 Benson Ave., Suite G100 Baltimore, MD. 21227
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
After a short stint in Florida, Baltimore native Lance Clelland returned to Maryland in 2011 to coach the South River football team citing the opportunity to be closer to family. The McDonogh graduate again cited family on Thursday when he announced plans to leave the Seahawks' program to become a teacher and football coach at St. Christopher's School in Richmond, Va. “I am both honored and humbled to become the next head football coach at St. Christopher's School,” Clelland, 34, said in a statement.
NEWS
March 25, 2009
On March 23, 2009, at 4:23A.M., Mary Patricia "Pat" Lance In lieu of flowers, please make any donations to the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
October 19, 2003
Suddenly on October 16, 2003, LANCE ELIOT CANTRELL; beloved husband of Joellen Cantrell; devoted father of Justin, Jordan, Bailey and Brody Cantrell; loving son of Jim Cantrell and the late Paul Schlough and Carol Hoffsteter; cherished step brother of Werner Schlough, Katie Silverman and Fred Schlough; loving grandson to Doris Hoffsteter, Rilla and Charles Cantrell. A Memorial service will be held at family owned Henry W. Jenkins and Sons Funeral Home, 16924 York Road, Monkton, on Monday, October 20 at 4 P.M. www.henrywjenkins.
NEWS
February 7, 2007
On February 5, 2007, LANCE B. DUKER, of Carney, MD; loving father of Courtney Duker and Zachary Duker; surrogated father of Josh and Adam Isaacs; dear brother of Melissa East and Cynthia Tyler; beloved friend of Bonnie Cronhardt Duker. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Services will be held at a later date. Those desiring may make contributions to the Hospice of Baltimore, 555 W. Towsontown Blvd, Towson, MD 21204.
SPORTS
By Alex Koustenis | July 31, 2002
Position: Offensive lineman College: Northwestern Who he is: The free-agent signee started at left guard for Northwestern last year. He had 23 straight starts and finished his college career with 29 starts. Last year, he helped lift the Northwestern offense to second in the Big Ten with an average 442.9 yards a game. How he feels about training camp: "The best parts are the live scrimmaging we get to do. The worst parts are probably getting used to the no-padded practices." What you may not know about him: "I'm from Reisterstown.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 20, 1992
LAUREL -- Fortunate Lance, who was beaten in a claimer at Garden State Park 10 days ago, ruined the comeback yesterday of former Preakness starter Fighting Notion.The 4-year-old gelding, ridden by Edgar Prado and trained by Dale Capuano, rallied from off the pace set by Fighting Notion and beat the chestnut front-runner by three-quarters of a length in the $19,000 Laurel feature.Fighting Notion took the early lead after favored Mighty Melody stumbled leaving the gate. He set quick fractions under a hand ride by Albert Delgado, getting six furlongs in 1 minute, 10 seconds.
NEWS
October 29, 1991
David John Bojanowski, a free-lance carpenter, died Saturday at the Deaton Medical Center. He had been in a coma since Oct. 1, 1990, when a van operated by an allegedly drunken driver crossed the median and collided head-on with his car.Services for Mr. Bojanowski, who was 27, were being held today at the Ruck Towson funeral establishment, 1050 York Road.He was a 1982 Loyola High School graduate and attended Frostburg State University and Towson State University. Before the accident, Mr. Bojanowski was working for various building contractors as a carpenter.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Pay attention, Pete Carroll. A Seahawks coach has your game plan vs. Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning figured out -- he's just not on the Seattle staff. South River Seahawks football coach Lance Clelland said that if he were coaching this weekend, his focus would be on forcing Manning and the Broncos offense out of their comfort zone. "The Seattle Seahawks certainly have a big challenge defensively," Clelland said Friday. "I am sure they would agree that when facing such a great QB and historic passing offense, the plan is to slow them down and disrupt Denver's offensive rhythm and timing more than anything else.
SPORTS
By Jesse Jones, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Randy McGill, known in local ring jousting circles as "The Knight of Camelot," arrives at Glen Arm Field early Saturday morning last weekend with his 17-year-old horse, Taz. John Angevine, "The Knight of Anjou," pulls up with his 11-year-old horse, Nip Tuck, who also goes by Andy. McGill, 38, of Towson and Angevine, 74, of Beltsville have taken different paths to the Amateur Jousting Club Championship Joust and the William Bell Joust, but they share a passion for the state's official sport.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
Regarding Michael Hill's recent column on sports cheating, despite his Shakespearian rhetoric, no quarter should be granted to Lance Armstrong, who for over a decade willfully and systematically lied, cheated and thumbed his nose at ethical behavior ("Fans crave what cheating provides," Jan. 25). Unfortunately, Mr. Hill's column promulgates the message of our country's increasingly influential sports and entertainment industry, which suggests that the primary role for the masses is to watch and be entertained by a small troop of elite athletes.
NEWS
By Charles Chester | January 29, 2013
Lance Armstrong has been rightly condemned for cheating. It takes skill, raw talent and extreme drive just to complete the Tour de France. However, to use unlawful measures to win it takes a complete unraveling of one's moral compass and a breakdown in ethical boundaries. This is true even if Mr. Armstrong has brought great inspiration to cancer survivors. As an attorney, one of the things that offends me the most is Mr. Armstrong's apparent misuse of the legal system. He abused it to suppress the truth by filing lawsuits against his accusers, lying under oath and, in general, attempting to subvert any investigations by reportedly trying to intimidate witnesses.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | January 24, 2013
As a longtime fan of bicycle racing - I was on the finish line in Paris in 1986 when Greg LeMond became the first American to win the Tour de France - I followed Lance Armstrong's career with intense excitement as he took cycling from the wings to center stage in his country's sport consciousness. That said, it became clear that while his story of cancer survival was compelling and inspiring, Mr. Armstrong was not a pleasant person. He was selfish and self-centered. But so are many athletes.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 23, 2013
I was kidding when I said that Lance Armstrong ought to pay me back for wasting time and money on his book "It's Not About the Bike. " But others who have taken offense at Armstrong's years of lies about using performance enhancing drugs have taken the issue a step further. USA Today reports that two readers of Armstrong's book have sued him and his publishers, claiming the book is a fraud based on lies and false advertising. The suit filed in U.S. District Court in California seeks class-action status on behalf of other readers and asks for refunds and other costs.  "Defendants knew or should have known these books were works of fiction," the suit states, according to USA Today.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1998
Lance Holden, co-owner of LAX World, a supplier of lacrosse equipment, died Sunday of lymphoma at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 59 and lived in Timonium.Mr. Holden and Jimmy "Darky" Darcangelo, both former lacrosse players, opened LAX World at Towson's Kenilworth Mall in 1988.Mr. Holden was a varsity lacrosse midfielder and attackman at City College high school and Loyola College. Mr. Darcangelo was a three-time Towson State College all-American and member of U.S. World Lacrosse teams.The second-floor store quickly became a rendezvous for lacrosse novices and seasoned high school and collegiate players.
NEWS
By STEPHEN HUNTER | September 6, 1994
Oct. 32, 1994Mr. and Mrs. Joseph JacksonRural Rte. 578, Harmony, Md.Dear Mr and Mrs. Jackson, The Department of Defense regrets to inform you that your son, Lance Corporal Dennis Jackson, 21, of Alpha Platoon, 2nd Marines, 22 Marine Expeditionary Unit, died today of wounds received while conducting military operations just outside Port-au-Prince, Haiti.Death came to him in the cruelest of forms as it often does in combat; while on routine patrol with elements of Alpha Platoon, he was hung up on wire at a crossroads.
NEWS
By Dionne Koller | January 20, 2013
Time will tell whether self-described "bully" Lance Armstrong's interview with Oprah Winfrey can repair the good name he lost when the United States Anti-Doping Agency revealed the truth behind his carefully crafted "narrative" of survival and sports glory. For me, to forgive Mr. Armstrong or not isn't the issue. Instead, Mr. Armstrong's fall illustrates how effectively we regulate Olympic movement athletics in the United States, and how that model for regulation can enhance the integrity of college and professional sports.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Tuesday morning on CBS, Oprah Winfrey said that Lance Armstrong "brought it" to the interview she had taped with him the day before. Now that we've seen the interview Thursday night, we know that isn't exactly true. Yes, he admitted to doping and lying and lying and doping and lying and doping some more. But what else could he do? The evidence gathered and the actions taken by the United States Anti-Doping Agency have made it impossible for him to do anything else. But anyone who watched the 90-minute conversation and didn't walk away understanding they were listening to a sociopath who still thinks he's the smartest guy in the culture wasn't paying attention.
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