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FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 26, 2003
WHILE PROWLING around these July mornings in the city, I happened upon a delightful discovery. Because of preparations for this weekend's Artscape, a number of streets were shut down around Mount Royal Station. With no cars to dodge, I had unrestricted walking, clean air and no noise. There weren't many others out at the hour when the morning sun is still low on the easterly horizon. This is their loss; a miserable spring has turned into a fine summer. And finding whole stretches of Baltimore blessedly relieved of rush-hour traffic is a gift worthy of a day of blue skies and low humidity.
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NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2003
Laurel Woods Elementary School is nestled among several apartment complexes in North Laurel. At one time, the neighborhood's cultural diversity and high transition rate splintered the community. Without resources such as the Columbia Association, a local YMCA or a park, it was difficult for residents to get to know one another. That changed in 2001, when the neighborhood won a grant designating Laurel Woods as a community center. For three years, the neighborhood will receive more than $2 million for after-school and adult programs through LAMP, which stands for Laurel Woods, Atholton, Murray Hill Project.
NEWS
May 4, 2003
On Friday, May 2, 2003 JOHN LEWIS LAMPE beloved husband of Marjorie Lampe (nee Bernstein); devoted father of Mark Lampe of Timonium, MD, John Lampe, Jr. of Todd, NC, Jane Jackson of Severna Park, MD and Marcia Westcott of Cincinnati, OH; devoted brother of David Lampe, Jr. of TX; loving grandfather of Lindsey and Brandon Jackson, Donna Lampe and Adrienne and Drew Westcott. Services at SOL LEVINSON BROS. HOME, 8900 Reisterstown Road at Mt. Wilson Lane on Sunday, May 4 at 10 a.m. Interment Beth El Memorial Park, Randallstown.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2003
She was a national heroine and a dogged reformer widely credited with inventing the modern profession of nursing. Yet Florence Nightingale left behind a medical mystery as lingering as her legacy. At the age of 37, Nightingale collapsed in her London home and for three decades rarely strayed from couch or bed, complaining of a wide and puzzling variety of symptoms ranging from pain in her spine to "recurrent spasms of the heart." Then, when she was 68, her affliction suddenly and mysteriously lifted.
NEWS
By Justin Paprocki and Justin Paprocki,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2002
With the last piece of funding in place, Union Bridge is ready to move forward with a $2.5 million project to beautify its Main Street with patterned crosswalks, Victorian-era street lamps and a town square. "We have a beautiful downtown area, but there's not many businesses in it. We decided we needed to go a little further to make Union Bridge a more positive place for businesses and residents," said James Schumacher, a consultant for the northwest Carroll County town. When completed in 2004, downtown Union Bridge will be more cohesive - matching crosswalks and sidewalks, new street lamps and parking meters - than the existing streetscape, which features utility wires crisscrossing the road, uneven sidewalks and empty storefronts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zeiler and David Zeiler,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2002
You've never seen a computer like Apple's new iMac. And that's the point. For a company with less than 5 percent of the market, innovation equals survival. The oddly appealing flat-panel iMac, unveiled by Apple CEO Steve Jobs at the recent Macworld Expo in San Francisco, fortifies the company's reputation as an industry trendsetter. At first glance, the machine appears to be an awkward hybrid, with its 15-inch flat panel screen attached to a white dome base by a sturdy, frictionless stainless steel arm that doubles as a handle.
NEWS
By Julie Klavens and Julie Klavens,Sun Staff | January 13, 2002
As the design revolution marches steadily across America, innovative furnishings are staking their claims in offices. Astute entrepreneurs know they can toss the solid, stolid, pseudo-Colonial credenzas and still present a professional image. Topdeq, which sells European-designed pieces and accessories for the workplace, is an excellent resource. The catalog's "wow" factor is high, from its shocking-pink cover to its pages filled with fresh, bold, sometimes playful pieces by such notable designers as Sir Norman Foster, Vico Magistretti and Philippe Starck.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Danziger and By Jeff Danziger,Special to the Sun | August 26, 2001
Carter Beats the Devil, by Glen David Gold. Hyperion. 483 pages. 24.95. E.L. Doctorow's career as a popular author was impelled by his book Ragtime, which drew many characters from history and placed them against things that really happened. The fiction-reading public blinked a few times at this appropriation, then shrugged and read on. The book was well-written, and the entire plot led to a satisfying explosion in the end. It was history as fun, not like ... eh, history. Later, when it was turned into a movie and then an insufferable musical, someone discovered that Doctorow hadn't even originated the story, but had cribbed it from a German author he thought (hoped)
NEWS
By Julie Klavens and Julie Klavens,Sun Staff | April 22, 2001
Earth Day reminds us today that simple acts can save the planet. With the average American producing about twice as much garbage as the average European, it's time to embrace the three Rs: reduce (use less of everything), reuse (before you toss anything in a trashcan, consider: can you find a second or third use for it?) and recycle (interpret this broadly: buy antique furniture and vintage clothing or trade with friends when you crave something new). The following items celebrate our Earth.
NEWS
By Tony Perry and Tony Perry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 6, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CORONADO - The nameplate on the door calls it the Advanced Collaborative Prototype. But to the officers and sailors on this Navy command ship, where the military tries out some innovations, the windowless space tucked away below decks is known as the Disney Room. Designed by Bran Ferren, the former president of research and development and creative technology for Walt Disney Imagineering, the conference room is decidedly un-Navy. The room is an experimental hybrid of the modern age, where the art of war is being blended with the art of entertainment and business.
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