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Lamb

NEWS
February 10, 1993
Anne Arundel County Councilwoman Maureen Lamb should be prepared. In the next few weeks, she's going to be painted as a radical, far-fetched health nut for trying to put some far-reaching restrictions on smoking.Already some of her colleagues are saying her anti-smoking bill is excessive. Almost every business organization in the county has registered opposition, saying economics matter more than breath. As usual, tobacco lobbyist Bruce Bereano -- one person for whom smoking truly is an economic issue because he makes a mint defending it -- has put in his two cents.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | February 19, 1993
County Councilwoman Maureen Lamb complained bitterly yesterday that Council Chairman David G. Boschert deliberately delayed action on her anti-smoking bill at Monday's meeting to prevent a vote."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2004
Whether or not you like Rosemary Barron's new cookbook, Flavors of Greece (Interlink Books, 2004, $27.95), will depend on what you're looking for in a cookbook. Do you want to read how folks in faraway places cook their native foods? Or do you want a book that gives you recipes you can make for dinner? Those who want a practical cooking manual would be better off skipping this book - unless they happen to have a barbecue pit in the back yard large enough to roast a whole lamb or an unglazed clay pot to cook potatoes and beets.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
The County Council has approved a process that will make it easier for community associations that own waterfront property to construct piers for fishing and swimming.The bill passed by a 6-1 vote at Monday night's meeting, with Councilwoman Maureen Lamb, D-Annapolis, casting the lone dissenting vote. It clarifies an ordinance adopted last November but set aside and rewritten after some river associations complained about not having their say.The newer version, which was drafted by Councilwoman Diane R. Evans, R-Arnold, subjects the piers to tough state Critical Area regulations, but grants them a conditional use status, meaning they are approved through the building permit process.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | April 8, 2009
Lamb is a popular dish in the spring. There are religious reasons. In Christian tradition, a lamb is symbolic of the risen Christ and is often the centerpiece of the Easter meal. In some Jewish homes, lamb is served during Passover, reminding believers of the Old Testament account of how households that adorned their door posts with the blood of the paschal lamb were spared from destruction. In some of Maryland's ethnic communities, lamb is the first choice for a ceremonial meal, regardless of the season.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 20, 2000
My mother was a good cook who prepared beef steaks and roasts well and who regularly turned out fork-tender pork chops and crispy fried chicken, but she never served lamb. In college I sampled my first bite of this meat and became an instant fan. Grilled lamb kebabs, broiled lamb chops, roast leg of lamb -- no matter how this meat was cooked, I was enamored of its delicious, robust taste. For the past few days, I have been working on a recipe for grilled, butterflied leg of lamb that I'm planning to serve for a casual dinner in several weeks.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2003
When the world is in turmoil, it's easier to see differences rather than similarities among religions, cultures and races. Yet, certain beliefs and customs link Jews, Christians and Muslims in ways that are at once humble and significant. In spring, the symbolic significance of lamb brings these faiths together, if not around the table, then through the Bible and their common origins in the Middle East. Lamb, as an emblem of sacrifice, plays a role at Passover, Roman Easter and Orthodox Easter (celebrated a week later)
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1990
How many former Maryland lawmakers does it take to change a light bulb?Just one -- Donald Lamb, a one-term Annapolis delegate who left the statehouse last spring to pursue his latest entrepreneurial scheme: changing light bulbs in shopping centers and office complexes.As his former legislative colleagues prepare to debate a $400 million budget deficit, a tax overhaul and growth controls when the General Assembly reconvenes Jan. 9, Lamb busies himself with the new Commercial Lighting Group, part of his 12-year-old company, Industrial Services Contractors.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 17, 2000
In the coming days, Christmas and New Year's will bring friends and family to many tables, including ours, so I have been culling my files for roasted meats to share at these celebrations. I found a recipe for fennel-and-mustard-scented leg of lamb, which I served to visitors earlier this fall. The roast, simple to prepare, was bursting with flavor and was quite popular with our friends. It would make a perfect centerpiece for a holiday meal. A platter of roasted vegetables, including red-skin or Yukon Gold potato wedges, thickly sliced carrots and wide strips of fennel, drizzled with olive oil and cooked in a hot oven until tender, makes an excellent accompaniment.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | April 23, 2000
Tender cuts of lamb are well suited to the ancient Asian culinary tradition of wok cooking. Aside from its efficiencies of fuel, cooking oil and time, wok cooking preserves the succulence of lamb chops and cuts from the leg or shoulder. And woks aren't just for stir-frying; a flat-bottomed steel wok placed directly over an electric burner browns these chops to perfection. Lamb Chops With Mustard- Rosemary Sauce Serves 6 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/3 cup Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 2 cloves garlic, pressed 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger 1 1/2 teaspoons dried rosemary 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper 6 lamb loin chops (1 1/2 inches thick)
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