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By Laura Lippman | March 6, 1997
Memo to President Clinton: Forget the commission on cloning. What you really need is one on punning.Send in the clones. Send in the clone puns. In less than two weeks, Dolly, that DNA marvel of a sheep, has been the subject of more "Hello, Dolly" puns than the Dalai Lama has managed to accumulate in 20 years.According to a search of the major newspapers database maintained by Nexis, "Hello, Dolly" has appeared in print at least 50 times since Feb. 24. (And that didn't include the headline on Page 1 of yesterday's Washington Post, "Hello Dolly, Goodbye to One Man's Quiet Life."
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NEWS
May 10, 2013
Just so your readers know, His Holiness the Dalai Lama was having fun with his fellow dignitaries at the end of his lecture Tuesday at the University of Maryland ("At UM, a face-to-face with the Dalai Lama," May 8). He demonstrated various forms of taking leave of another person - shaking a hand, giving a hug, a kiss on a cheek or touching foreheads (a traditional Tibetan form). He also demonstrated rubbing noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley, a form the Tibetan spiritual leader attributed to the Maori.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 28, 1996
BEIJING -- A leading dissident monk died this month in a prison in Tibet, where the Chinese authorities are carrying out a campaign for tighter political control, international human rights groups reported late Friday.As Chinese armed forces struggle to keep a lid on protests that have broken out in several Tibetan monasteries in recent months, news of the monk's death is likely to add to the political tension.The monk, Kelsang Thutop, 49, died July 5 in Drapchi Prison in Lhasa, the Tibetan capital, where he was serving an 18-year sentence for political subversion, said Amnesty International and the Tibet Information Network, both London-based human rights groups.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
He pulled on a Terps visor, to the crowd's delight. He rubbed noses with Gov. Martin O'Malley. And the Dalai Lama was met Tuesday with rounds of applause from a crowd of 15,000 at the University of Maryland, College Park's Comcast Center. "Sit down," the 78-year-old Tibetan spiritual leader said in a firm but friendly voice when he approached the podium and the crowd rose to its feet. "No formality! We are [the] same. … The way we are born, the way we die: no formality. " Clad in red robes and his trademark spectacles, the Dalai Lama appeared at the university to give an address on peace, compassion and fellowship as part of the Anwar Sadat Lecture Series.
NEWS
By Michael Kohn and Michael Kohn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 2, 1999
ULAANBAATAR, Mongolia -- Storm clouds roll over the city and suddenly rip open to pour rain over this sprawling, dusty outpost. A crowd of Buddhists crane their necks heavenward and weep.It is more than relief from the blazing central Asian sky that prompts the tears. These people believe they are witnessing a miracle. Mongolians wipe the sweat off winning racehorses for good luck, and these believers rub and lather the rain into their hands and faces."A gift from the gods," someone says.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY TC and ANN HORNADAY TC,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 16, 1998
In a lush, sensuous dreamscape that fully exploits the cinema's potential for virtually wordless emotional communication, Martin Scorsese has taken yet another experimental turn with "Kundun," his interpretation of the early life of the 14th Tibetan Dalai Lama.If his 17th film seems to resemble a meditative tone poem more than the pulsating, kinetic paeans to mob life for which he is most famous, "Kundun" (the title refers to the name used to address the Dalai Lama) still bursts with the love of movement and color that marks Scorsese's best works.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 8, 2008
Elections officials begin ballot count in Ghana ACCRA, Ghana : Elections officials began counting ballots late yesterday in one of Africa's rare democracies, where voters are painfully aware of the example they are setting on a continent better known for coups, rigged elections and one-man rule. In courtyards throughout the capital, elections officials put police tape around the plywood tables where they began sorting ballots. Hundreds of voters slept on the pavement outside their polling stations in an effort to be first yesterday to cast their ballot.
SPORTS
October 18, 2007
Today's sports matchup: Alyssa Milano vs. Gabrielle Union. Over at one of Mr. Flip's favorite Web sites, thebiglead.com, there is a tale of the tape of sorts, comparing the two actresses for their lists of athletes whom they have dated. Milano went through a starting rotation's worth of major league pitchers - Josh Beckett, Brad Penny, Barry Zito and Carl Pavano. Before connecting with the New York Yankees' Derek Jeter, Union was linked to NBA All-Star Jason Kidd, Michigan running back Chris Howard (her ex-husband)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 25, 2000
"The Cup" is an extraordinary movie, for myriad reasons. It marks the directorial debut of Khyentse Norbu, a Tibetan Buddhist lama. It is the first film to be shot in Norbu's native Bhutan. It stars an ensemble of mostly amateur actors, many of them taken from the Chokling Monastery, a Tibetan refugee settlement in the Himalayan foothills. But given its spiritual and political pedigree, "The Cup" is even more extraordinary for being a simple tale, well told, about a group of monks who just want to watch the World Cup soccer finals.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 8, 1998
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. -- That wispy but stubborn ideal "world peace" attempted a comeback here on the cold asphalt outside a college football stadium.About 600 University of Virginia students camped out all night Sunday in the frigid fall air for a chance to snag the hottest ticket in town -- not for a rock concert or championship bowl game but for an academic conference featuring some of the world's most famous peacemakers."
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
The Dalai Lama, the spiritual leader for Tibetan Buddhists, will speak in May at the University of Maryland as part of the Sadat Lecture for Peace, an annual series that has drawn world leaders such as Madeleine Albright, Nelson Mandela and Jimmy Carter. The event will be held at 10 a.m. May 7 at the Comcast Center on the College Park campus. Tickets are free but required. "It is very important that we expose our students to the broadest cultural and international diversity possible, and help them become global citizens," University of Maryland President Wallace Loh said in a statement.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
- China again urged President Barack Obama on Wednesday not to hold a planned meeting with Dalai Lama, saying it would further hurt already strained bilateral relations. It was the second successive day that China has spoken out against the meeting, and comes after Beijing said ties had been harmed by a U.S. announcement last week that it would sell arms to Taiwan. The United States has already brushed aside previous warnings from China, and White House spokesman Bill Burton said Tuesday the meeting was still planned, although no date has been set. "The president told ... China's leaders during his trip last year that he would meet with the Dalai Lama, and he intends to do so. The Dalai Lama is an internationally respected religious and cultural leader, and the president will meet with him in that capacity," Burton said.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
BEIJING - China warned President Barack Obama today not to meet the Dalai Lama, saying any such meeting would harm bilateral relations. An Obama meeting with the Dalai Lama would "seriously undermine the political foundation of Sino-U.S. relations," said Zhu Weiqun, executive deputy head of the Communist Party's United Front Work Department. The warning to Obama comes after recent signals from U.S. officials that Obama might soon meet the exiled Tibetan leader - something Chinese officials are keen to avoid before President Hu Jintao travels to Washington, possibly in April.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 8, 2008
Elections officials begin ballot count in Ghana ACCRA, Ghana : Elections officials began counting ballots late yesterday in one of Africa's rare democracies, where voters are painfully aware of the example they are setting on a continent better known for coups, rigged elections and one-man rule. In courtyards throughout the capital, elections officials put police tape around the plywood tables where they began sorting ballots. Hundreds of voters slept on the pavement outside their polling stations in an effort to be first yesterday to cast their ballot.
NEWS
By Elliot Sperling | April 7, 2008
The Dalai Lama's rationale for keeping Tibet in China has always had a certain logic to it: China is a great country, and Tibet would benefit by being part of it. Alas, most of the benefit to being a part of China on display in recent weeks has not been very tempting. The fact is, despite displays of clear Tibetan nationalism and calls for independence coming from Tibet, the Dalai Lama has long since made up his mind about Tibet's future and will not be moved. And China has long since made up its mind about the Dalai Lama and - more seriously - has made very astute use of him. Since the early 1970s, the Dalai Lama has had no desire to see Tibet independent, though he did not publicly acknowledge this changed position until 1988, when he offered a proposal for partial autonomy.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick | March 17, 2008
BEIJING -- Defying a major deployment of Chinese security forces, ethnic Tibetan protesters unfurled their forbidden national flag and set fire to a police station as the violence that by some reports has claimed 80 lives spread into Sichuan province and other parts of western China. The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, met yesterday with reporters in the mountain town of Dharamsala, India, and told them he was powerless to stop the protests. "It's a people's movement, so it's up to them.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick | March 17, 2008
BEIJING -- Defying a major deployment of Chinese security forces, ethnic Tibetan protesters unfurled their forbidden national flag and set fire to a police station as the violence that by some reports has claimed 80 lives spread into Sichuan province and other parts of western China. The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, met yesterday with reporters in the mountain town of Dharamsala, India, and told them he was powerless to stop the protests. "It's a people's movement, so it's up to them.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 2000
One of Himalayan Buddhism's most important lamas has escaped Chinese-controlled Tibet in a weeklong undercover flight across Nepal and into India. The religious leader, the 14-year-old head of the Karmapa Buddhist order, stole away from the Tsurphu Monastery, north of Lhasa, Dec. 28, and arrived unannounced and unexpected Wednesday in Dharamshala, India, where the Dalai Lama welcomed him. "It is a joyful thing for all Tibetan Buddhists," said Robert A....
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | October 19, 2007
Rick Ray's 10 Questions for the Dalai Lama, a documentary that uses as its centerpiece a one-hour interview with the spiritual leader of the Tibetan people, will be shown at 7 p.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m. Monday at Your Prescription for Health Learning Center, 10210 S. Dolfield Road in Owings Mills. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door, if available, or by calling 410-356-2169. Information: spiritualpath@mindspring.com or 410-581-9022. A film for the `Cure' Adventures for the Cure, narrated by three-time Tour de France winner Greg Lemond, documents a 6,500-mile cross-country bicycle trip that raises money for the American Diabetes Association and Kupenda for the Children, which benefits African children with disabilities.
SPORTS
October 18, 2007
Today's sports matchup: Alyssa Milano vs. Gabrielle Union. Over at one of Mr. Flip's favorite Web sites, thebiglead.com, there is a tale of the tape of sorts, comparing the two actresses for their lists of athletes whom they have dated. Milano went through a starting rotation's worth of major league pitchers - Josh Beckett, Brad Penny, Barry Zito and Carl Pavano. Before connecting with the New York Yankees' Derek Jeter, Union was linked to NBA All-Star Jason Kidd, Michigan running back Chris Howard (her ex-husband)
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