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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | August 12, 1992
A longtime Phoenix dentist was charged yesterday with a hit-and-run accident in which a teen-ager -- who turned out to be one of his former patients -- was pinned to a tree by a Mercedes-Benz.Michael James Bennett, 50, of the 14000 block of Jarrettsville Pike in Phoenix, is charged with failure to remain at an accident scene and failure to render aid in the July 24 accident, Baltimore County police said.Dr. Bennett was charged in a summons. A trial date hasn't been set.The victim, Dan Lally, 15, was helping a stranded motorist on Paper Mill Road when the car came around a curve and hit him shortly after 10 p.m.The Lally youth had been a patient of Dr. Bennett's when he was 3 or 4, the youth said last night.
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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1997
A burglary suspect found sleeping in an Arnold neighborhood had an unusual assortment of items in his car, according to county police -- a police badge, a rubber mask, a rifle and some marijuana.Officer James McDermott found the man slumped over in the passenger seat of his Volkswagen shortly before 2 a.m. Monday on Harmony Avenue.The man had no identification, but he gave McDermott his name -- Peter Joseph Lally -- and the officer found that he was wanted by Baltimore County police on charges in a burglary Feb. 23 of Lally's uncle's Towson law office, police said.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
The president of the education software company LeapFrog SchoolHouse has resigned in response to a company investigation into its $1 million sale to the Prince George's County schools in June, corporate officials announced yesterday. Bob Lally's resignation is the first major fallout from a transaction that has focused scrutiny on schools chief Andre J. Hornsby and his relationship with a saleswoman for the $40-million-a-year Emeryville, Calif., company. Lally resigned "in response to an internal investigation under LeapFrog's code of conduct relating to a commission paid to a sales representative," the company's parent company, LeapFrog Enterprises Inc., said in a statement.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 14, 1995
ON THE FOURTH of July, 1963, most Baltimore residents were relaxing and having fun. But not everybody was taking a holiday. Some people were busy working to help the struggle for human rights in Baltimore.Around noon that day, about 400 people gathered at the Metropolitan United Methodist Church at 1121 W. Lanvale St. Among those assembled were some of the most respected and widely known clergymen, both local and national, of several faiths, including: the Rev. Joseph Connolly, Monsignor Austin L. Healy, Rabbi Morris Lieberman, the Rev. Chester Wickwire, now chaplain emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University, and the Rev. Marion C. Bascom Sr., then chairman of the local ministerial alliance.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 3, 1992
BOWIE -- Washington Bullets trainer John Lally, who has been calling the NBA on a regular basis to report the team's latest injuries, expected to raise some eyebrows in the league office with the latest casualty.Reserve guard Ledell Eackles sat out practice at Bowie State yesterday, his right (shooting) hand bandaged to protect a gunpowder burn from getting infected.The injury was not considered serious, and Eackles was expected to suit up against the New Jersey Nets at the Meadowlands tonight.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2004
A Prince George's County circuit court judge yesterday voided a 4-year-old promotional contract between Riddick Bowe and Washington-based Jeffrey Jackson, clearing the way for the former heavyweight champion to negotiate fights with any promoter. "I'm ecstatic. I feel like I finally have a fresh start," said Bowe (40-1, 32 knockouts), who is scheduled to end a nearly eight-year ring absence on Sept. 25 against 38-year-old journeyman Jeff Lally (23-23-1, 10 KOs) of Louisville, Ky., in Shawnee, Okla.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackson | August 16, 1991
The TV Repairman: The golf stop on CBS this weekend, the International, isn't your usual medal-play tournament, remember. Competitors get points for heroics (two for a birdie, five for an eagle), penalties for stumbles (minus one for a bogey, minus three for a double) with the top 72 qualifying after the first two rounds. The field for Sunday will be down to 24 golfers, starting from scratch. It's not as bad as it sounds, honest.* Terry Norris (28-3) and Brett Lally (29-5) will be the guys duking it out on HBO tomorrow (10 p.m.)
NEWS
February 22, 1997
Welfare reform requires a lot of cooperationI would like to commend Sun reporter Kathy Lally for her comprehensive Feb. 2 article, ''Reworking welfare: Maryland recipients join the push for self-sufficiency,'' which describes the complexities of welfare reform.The article contained several important messages for Marylanders. As the personal success stories of former recipients Sheryl Lindsay and Barbara Mason indicated, welfare recipients want to become productive wage earners. Unfortunately, the word ''welfare'' continues to carry a stigma that can be an obstacle for those attempting to enter the labor market.
FEATURES
February 24, 1991
In a second-floor classroom at Booker T. Washington Middle School, in the very heart of one of the city's most poverty-stricken and life-threatening neighborhoods, eight sixth-graders are squirming in their seats, as sixth-graders do whenever they find themselves in a room with desks and blackboard, and one boy finally topples his desk and falls to the floor. Laughter momentarily interrupts their talk of courage and bravery and love.On the street below the classroom window, three police cars and a paddy wagon are parked, summoned to deal with a couple of boys who dragged a young girl into a bathroom down the hall, intent on molesting her. The kids pay no attention to the police cars, a common-enough sight in West Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
When it comes to changing diapers, breastfeeding and swaddling, 40 is the new 30. A recent national report found birth rates falling in virtually every age group of women in their childbearing years — except for those between 40 and 50. The group aged 40 to 44 had its largest birth rate since 1967. Benefiting from improvements in reproductive technology and the fact that most Americans are living longer, more women 40 and over are choosing to have children in later life, particularly after they've accomplished career goals.
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