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By Eric Harrison and Eric Harrison,Los Angeles Times | August 6, 1991
PINE RIDGE, S.D. -- When Kevin Costner was filming "Dances With Wolves" in South Dakota last year, Loretta Cook, a Lakota Sioux Indian, had never heard of the actor.A friend who worked on the movie as an extra dropped by and showed her a photograph of herself and Costner. "Oh, nice," Cook responded. "Who is he? Your boyfriend?"Today, one would be hard pressed to find anyone in South Dakota who does not know who Costner is. His film about the life of a U.S. cavalryman who joins the Sioux is exploited in state-sponsored ads to promote tourism.
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Special to The Aegis | April 22, 2013
Area high school math students applied their recently learned skills today while getting a taste of military life courtesy of Maryland Army National Guard Soldiers from the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade and the 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment. Ho Chang, a mathematics teacher at Edgewood High School and a former Army air defense artillery officer, brought 60 of his juniors and seniors out to Lauderick Creek Training Site and the nearby Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground to examine vehicle displays of trucks and helicopters and participate in a land navigation course, seeing first-hand how math permeates all aspects of even military life.
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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 22, 1990
Washington - Crowds swarmed outside the Uptown Theater Friday night because they had to -- HAD TO -- see heart-throb actor Kevin Costner.But many of those who paid up to $100 for the world premiere of "Dances With Wolves," Mr. Costner's epic new film about a Lakota Indian frontier before the encroachment of white settlers, came because they had to see the movie.Mixed in with an audience of members of Congress, football players and models were those like Bill Achord. He came from faraway Lincoln, Neb., where there's a large Lakota community, because he was so anxious to see the movie.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | November 16, 2007
Standing Silent Nation is Suree Towfighnia's documentary about a Lakota family whose hemp crop is destroyed every year by federal agents - despite the family's claims that such action violates their South Dakota reservation's sovereignty. The film will be shown at 8 tonight at the Creative Alliance, 3134 Eastern Ave. Representatives from the Baltimore American Indian Center, as well as the film's producer, Courtney Hermann, will be on hand to discuss the film and the issues it raises. Tickets are $8, $6 for alliance members.
NEWS
By JUDY PERES | July 30, 2006
KYLE, S.D. -- Cecelia Fire Thunder likes to recount the legend of the White Buffalo Calf Woman, who delivered the sacred pipe and its teachings to the Lakota nation. Long ago, the legend goes, two men encountered a holy woman who first appeared to them as a white buffalo calf. One man, awe-struck, prayed. The other had lustful thoughts and tried to grab the woman. He was turned into a pile of bones. "The first teaching of the pipe is sexual respect for women," said Fire Thunder, the first female president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE and JONI GUHNE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2006
Laura Williams discovered the subject for her Girl Scout Gold Award project in her church bulletin. A notice from the Presbytery of Baltimore caught her eye about a mission trip to the Hou Kola Learning Camp last July on a South Dakota reservation of the Lakota Indian tribe. Just right, she thought, because she was looking for a volunteer project outside her community. A Gold Award requires 50 hours of work on a project, but Laura devoted more than 300 hours to her project, studying the educational needs of Lakota children.
NEWS
By Joseph Bruchac | September 20, 2000
Editor's note: A vision quest clarifies one boy's destiny. Crazy Horse, they say, was always different. Many children cry when they are born, but not Crazy Horse. He studied the world with serious eyes. "Look at our son," his mother said. "How brave he is!" "See how curly his hair is," said his father, Tashunka Witco. "We will call him Curly," said his mother. Seasons passed. The boy named Curly grew strong and wiry, but would never be tall. Though small, Curly was a leader. When others spoke, he was quiet.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 9, 2005
Into the West, cable channel TNT's 12-hour epic about life on the 19th-century frontier, is American mythology retold in the voice of multiculturalism. Re-imagining the national past is a tall order, but who better to take it on than Steven Spielberg, the filmmaker and producer who helped craft new narratives about World War II heroism (Band of Brothers) and the righteousness of some European gentiles during the Holocaust (Schindler's List)? Spielberg is the executive producer of this sprawling, panoramic miniseries about the collision of cultures that took place in the American Eden, west of the Mississippi.
NEWS
By Tim Giago | March 5, 1996
RAPID CITY, S.D. -- We all know the story of a complaint voiced about how bad the youth of today have become and then discovering the remark was made 2,000 years ago. Lends credence to the statement, ''The more things change, the more they stay the same.''Perhaps some cultures are strong enough to overcome the recklessness of their youth, but when a culture is surrounded by a dominant society with many different values, how long can it withstand the corruption to which it is subjected?I don't mean corruption in the literal sense, but corruption because it flies in the face of traditions that are centuries old, traditions that preceded the invasion of a new culture on this continent by thousands of years.
EXPLORE
Special to The Aegis | April 22, 2013
Area high school math students applied their recently learned skills today while getting a taste of military life courtesy of Maryland Army National Guard Soldiers from the 29th Combat Aviation Brigade and the 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment. Ho Chang, a mathematics teacher at Edgewood High School and a former Army air defense artillery officer, brought 60 of his juniors and seniors out to Lauderick Creek Training Site and the nearby Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground to examine vehicle displays of trucks and helicopters and participate in a land navigation course, seeing first-hand how math permeates all aspects of even military life.
NEWS
By JUDY PERES | July 30, 2006
KYLE, S.D. -- Cecelia Fire Thunder likes to recount the legend of the White Buffalo Calf Woman, who delivered the sacred pipe and its teachings to the Lakota nation. Long ago, the legend goes, two men encountered a holy woman who first appeared to them as a white buffalo calf. One man, awe-struck, prayed. The other had lustful thoughts and tried to grab the woman. He was turned into a pile of bones. "The first teaching of the pipe is sexual respect for women," said Fire Thunder, the first female president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE and JONI GUHNE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2006
Laura Williams discovered the subject for her Girl Scout Gold Award project in her church bulletin. A notice from the Presbytery of Baltimore caught her eye about a mission trip to the Hou Kola Learning Camp last July on a South Dakota reservation of the Lakota Indian tribe. Just right, she thought, because she was looking for a volunteer project outside her community. A Gold Award requires 50 hours of work on a project, but Laura devoted more than 300 hours to her project, studying the educational needs of Lakota children.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 9, 2005
Into the West, cable channel TNT's 12-hour epic about life on the 19th-century frontier, is American mythology retold in the voice of multiculturalism. Re-imagining the national past is a tall order, but who better to take it on than Steven Spielberg, the filmmaker and producer who helped craft new narratives about World War II heroism (Band of Brothers) and the righteousness of some European gentiles during the Holocaust (Schindler's List)? Spielberg is the executive producer of this sprawling, panoramic miniseries about the collision of cultures that took place in the American Eden, west of the Mississippi.
TOPIC
By Tim Giago (Nanwica Kciji) and Tim Giago (Nanwica Kciji),LAKOTA MEDIA INC | December 28, 2003
WOUNDED KNEE, S.D. -- On crystal-clear nights, when winter winds whistle through the hills and canyons around Wounded Knee Creek, the Lakota elders say it is so cold that one can hear the twigs snapping in the frigid air. They called this time of the year "the Moon of the Popping Trees." It was on such a winter morning on Dec. 29, 1890, that the crack of a single rifle brought a day of infamy that still lives in the hearts and minds of the Lakota people. After the rifle spoke there was a pause and then the rifles and Hotchkiss guns of the 7th Cavalry opened up on the men, women and children camped at Wounded Knee.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 8, 2000
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. - For seven years, the estate of revered Lakota warrior Crazy Horse tried to stop a company from using his name to promote and sell a malt liquor. After past attempts at litigation failed, the Crazy Horse estate, headed by Seth Big Crow of Rosebud, filed a complaint in federal court that asks for injunctive and compensatory relief. A previous attempt to stop the sale of the malt liquor failed after the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the Rosebud Tribal Court had no standing because the malt liquor was neither sold nor bottled on the reservation.
NEWS
By Joseph Bruchac | September 20, 2000
Editor's note: A vision quest clarifies one boy's destiny. Crazy Horse, they say, was always different. Many children cry when they are born, but not Crazy Horse. He studied the world with serious eyes. "Look at our son," his mother said. "How brave he is!" "See how curly his hair is," said his father, Tashunka Witco. "We will call him Curly," said his mother. Seasons passed. The boy named Curly grew strong and wiry, but would never be tall. Though small, Curly was a leader. When others spoke, he was quiet.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | November 16, 2007
Standing Silent Nation is Suree Towfighnia's documentary about a Lakota family whose hemp crop is destroyed every year by federal agents - despite the family's claims that such action violates their South Dakota reservation's sovereignty. The film will be shown at 8 tonight at the Creative Alliance, 3134 Eastern Ave. Representatives from the Baltimore American Indian Center, as well as the film's producer, Courtney Hermann, will be on hand to discuss the film and the issues it raises. Tickets are $8, $6 for alliance members.
NEWS
By Dan Baum and Dan Baum,Contributing Writer | July 13, 1992
PINE RIDGE LAKOTA INDIAN RESERVATION -- The reservation's radio station is surrounded.For more than two months, protesters have laid siege to KILI, "the voice of the Lakota nation," demanding the resignation of the station's white manager and a return to programming rooted in the Oglala Sioux tribe's language and traditions.A half-dozen tepees stand at the bottom of Porcupine Butte, site of KILI's studio and 100,000-watt transmitter. Another tepee looms at the crown of the butte, where activists watch to prevent the arrival of Tom Casey, the station manager.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 5, 1997
The Lakota Indians of South Dakota will soon be receiving a shipment of children's books, thanks to Girl Scout Troop 1576.The troop has also entertained children closer to home with a holiday puppet show.Last month, the Scouts made a poster and decorated a box for the River Hill village office for the collection of donated books.Village manager Sunny McGuinn alerted residents to the project with an item in the village newsletter.Troop leader Donna Goldman reported that, as of last week, about four small moving boxes filled with books had been collected.
NEWS
By Tim Giago | March 5, 1996
RAPID CITY, S.D. -- We all know the story of a complaint voiced about how bad the youth of today have become and then discovering the remark was made 2,000 years ago. Lends credence to the statement, ''The more things change, the more they stay the same.''Perhaps some cultures are strong enough to overcome the recklessness of their youth, but when a culture is surrounded by a dominant society with many different values, how long can it withstand the corruption to which it is subjected?I don't mean corruption in the literal sense, but corruption because it flies in the face of traditions that are centuries old, traditions that preceded the invasion of a new culture on this continent by thousands of years.
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