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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Who said there are no second acts in American dining? Clyde's of Columbia has been an anchor on the Columbia lakefront since 1975. That's impressive, but time has a way of catching up with everything. And now that Columbia is in the middle of a multi-year downtown revitalization, it was time to freshen up Clyde's, too. So Clyde's closed in late 2012, gave itself a $5 million renovation, and reopened in April. The renovations are both structural and cosmetic. Returning patrons might not notice things like the new sprinkler system, but they'll note that Clyde's has moved closer to the lake - an extension has added both breathing room and additional booth seating.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Officials plan to mark the start of the first new office building in downtown Columbia in more than a decade, with a formal groundbreaking Tuesday on a nine-story, roughly $75 million complex of apartments, offices and shops near Lake Kittamaqundi. LPP Investors, LLC Partner David Costello, whose Columbia-based Costello Construction firm will build the new Little Patuxent Square complex, said he wants the project to strengthen the urban fabric of the lakefront, which is also set to add a Whole Foods store this year.
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Contributing Writer | August 22, 1995
You never know what you'll see at Columbia's Lakefront on "Open Stage Night."One Tuesday, you might catch a glimpse of a 74-year-old interpretive dancer. Or a multigenerational crowd clapping to the beat of a rendition of "Those Were the Days." Or the debut of a teen-age psychedelic-funk-jazz ensemble.Earlier this summer, one man even rose to sing a marriage proposal.Sometimes the performers themselves don't know what will happen on stage. Guitarist Don Bridges and singer Bobbi Bland were in the middle of a song when an anonymous harmonica player got up on stage and accompanied them.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | December 2, 2013
Baltimore restaurateurs Tony Foreman and Cindy Wolf announced Monday that a second Petit Louis Bistro will open on the downtown Columbia lakefront.  The 6,943 square foot French restaurant, which the pair hope to open by the end of the year, will include outdoor seating, a pastry operation, private dining and event space, according to a news release.  "Cindy and I are truly excited about the details of the room and being on the lake,” said...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric Adams | June 28, 1991
Unless you've been living in a cave, you've probably hear about the big name acts taking part in the Columbia Festival of the Arts, which began its 11-day run last night. But somewhat obscured by the glamour of headliners like the Alvin Ailey AmericUnless you've been living in a cave, you've probably heard about the big name acts taking part in the Columbia Festival of the Arts, which began its 11-day run last night. But somewhat obscured by the glamour of headliners like the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, or the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center are the free lakefront events scheduled for afternoons and evenings this weekend and next.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
As the county works to refine a planned makeover of downtown Columbia, at least one landmark business - Clyde's restaurant - is expected to keep a home on the Town Center lakefront, said Marsha S. McLaughlin, director of the county's Department of Planning and Zoning. The restaurant, which last month celebrated its 30th anniversary in Columbia, faced the prospect of losing its building when Town Center is redeveloped. But McLaughlin has moved to reassure the restaurant and its patrons.
NEWS
By Marian Morton and Marian Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2001
The annual Columbia Festival of the Arts is expected to kick off tonight with an unprecedented splash. For the first time, the festival's lineup will also include an opening ceremony, "Lighting up the Lakefront," beginning at sundown. Molly Ross, a self-described "celebration artist," designed the opening activities, which will include fireworks, a lantern parade and music to celebrate the start of the two-week-long festival and Columbia's 34th birthday. Ross solicited help from the community in planning the ceremony, and dozens of people turned out at four workshops last weekend to build more than 100 bamboo and paper lanterns to light the lakefront.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995
The arts come alive in Columbia today when the Seventh Annual Columbia Festival of the Arts -- 10 days of music, theater, dance and the visual arts -- gets under way. The festival, which runs through June 25, will feature performances at 11 venues around town, including free concerts, activities and crafts exhibits at the Lakefront in Columbia's Town Center.Among the many performers scheduled are jazz singers Casscheduled are jazz singers Cassandra Wilson and Diane Schuur, the Uptown String Quartet, the imaginative dance-acrobatic-mime group Pilobolus, jazz pianist and composer George Shearing, actress Claire Bloom, folk singer Judi Tal and author Mary Gordon.
FEATURES
June 11, 1995
The arts come alive in vibrant style in Columbia this week when the seventh annual Columbia Festival of the Arts -- 10 days of music, theater, dance and the visual arts -- gets under way. Scheduled from Friday through June 25, the festival will feature performances at 11 venues, including free concerts, activities and crafts exhibits at the Lakefront in Columbia's Town Center.Among the many performers scheduled are jazz singers Cassandra Wilson and Diane Schuur, the Uptown String Quartet, the imaginative dance-acrobatic-mime group Pilobolus, jazz pianist and composer George Shearing, actress Claire Bloom, folk singer Judi Tal and author Mary Gordon.
NEWS
July 7, 2006
Independence Day in Columbia means Lake Kittamaqundi fireworks and the Longfellow Neighborhood Parade. At left, a popping balloon surprises Laura Shoemaker, 15, as she decorates a truck for the parade. Above, Leah Hough, 5, and Brianna Hoffman, 15, enjoy fireworks on the Columbia lakefront. Below, Ben Bausch, 27, of Columbia gives an impromptu dance performance at the lakefront gathering.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Waterfront homes, particularly those competitively priced and in excellent condition, rarely stay long on the market. Such was the case with 10737 Catterskill Court, located on the banks of Columbia's Wilde Lake. The transitional-style rancher sold for its asking price of $675,000 only five days after it was listed. "There were multiple offers on this home," said listing agent Bob Lucido, of RE/MAX Advantage Realty. "We did an open house, and it sold on the same day. " Located on a cul-de-sac in the Bryant Woods neighborhood of Columbia, the home's open floor plan offers views of the lake and foliage from every window.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
Who said there are no second acts in American dining? Clyde's of Columbia has been an anchor on the Columbia lakefront since 1975. That's impressive, but time has a way of catching up with everything. And now that Columbia is in the middle of a multi-year downtown revitalization, it was time to freshen up Clyde's, too. So Clyde's closed in late 2012, gave itself a $5 million renovation, and reopened in April. The renovations are both structural and cosmetic. Returning patrons might not notice things like the new sprinkler system, but they'll note that Clyde's has moved closer to the lake - an extension has added both breathing room and additional booth seating.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Howard County Democrats played it coy Thursday night at their bash honoring Howard County Executive Ken Ulman but were openly proud that their favorite son is poised to join Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown as No. 2 on the 2014 gubernatorial ticket. There were many oblique references, including from Ulman, to the announcement scheduled for Monday at the lakefront in Columbia. But at least from the podium, there were only veiled references to the worst-kept secret in Maryland politics. The four Democratic members of the Howard County Council all delivered teasing but affectionate recollections of their dealings with Ulman, their county executive since 2006, over the years.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 16, 2013
Columbia's core, which is in the early stages of redevelopment, is the territory for a trio of walking tours organized by the Columbia Association's Columbia Archives. The WalkAlong event will take place Saturday, May 4, and participants can choose one of three routes. The guided tours, which last about two hours, will depart from the Columbia Archives (at 10227 Wincopin Circle) at 10 a.m. One tour will focus on the architecture of Frank Gehry, including Merriweather Post Pavilion and the former Rouse Co. headquarters.
NEWS
By Meg Tully, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
For people-watching, there is no better spot than Joe Caliguro's Columbia townhouse. He and his wife can walk out to the porch and find a stream of people walking by on the path below. Caliguro, a retired television producer, owns one of about 130 houses that border the nearly 2-mile public trail next to Lake Elkhorn. For the residents who live nearby, the man-made lake is also an extension of their backyards, providing picturesque views and lots of foot traffic just beyond their porches.
EXPLORE
October 4, 2011
Access to the Columbia pedestrian bridge over Route 29 has been sharply compromised for pedestrians, wheelchair-bound handicapped and especially cyclists for over a year now due to lake dredging and sewer replacement. A mulch path constructed for continued access has not been maintained and is frequently obstructed by fallen branches and poison ivy. Now comes a plan to widen Route 29, but with no news on how this will impact the future of this bridge. The bridge is essential for commuting and active lifestyles, activities Columbia and Howard County claim to value.
NEWS
May 1, 2005
THE QUESTION: What's that tall sculpture on Columbia's downtown lakefront that looks like a big dandelion? THE ANSWER: That would be the People Tree, Columbia's symbol. The 14-foot sculpture with 66 gilded people as branches was designed by Baltimore artist Pierre duFayet. It represents James W. Rouse's idea of Columbia being a "garden for growing people."
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | August 18, 1996
25 years ago (week of August 15-21, 1971):Concerned about rumors of a curfew being imposed on the lakefront area at Lake Kittamaqundi in Columbia, some of the teen-agers who liked to congregate in the area began a self-policing action. Forming a group called "The Committee to Keep the Lake Open," the young people distributed fliers asking people to behave properly. Committee members also picked up trash in the lakefront area.50 years ago (week of August 11-17, 1946):The Highland 4-H Club met at the home of Sally Sullivan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Nineteen films, including the Baltimore-area premiere of director Rob Reiner's "Flipped," will be shown as part of the 40th annual Columbia Lakefront Film Festival, organizers announced Saturday. The free festival, held at the Columbia lakefront off Little Patuxent Parkway, opens June 17 with "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part One" and closes Aug. 22 with "Despicable Me. " Movies are scheduled for every Monday and Friday evening, except for July 4. Parking is free, and all films begin at dusk, usually around 8:30 p.m. The PG-rated "Flipped," released to a limited theatrical run and based on the young-adult novel by Wendelin Van Draanen, is the story of two middle-schoolers (Madeleine Carroll and Callan McAuliffe)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
For 39 summers, Columbia filmgoers have thronged to the Lakefront Film Festival. Its host and programmer, Tom Brzezinski, aka Mr. B, was holding summer community screenings two years before that. As he said in a series of e-mails, he wanted to give "something back to the community" after he helped open, in September, 1968, the first Howard County public school in Columbia — Bryant Woods Elementary, where he served as the first media specialist/librarian in the county school system.
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