Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLake Wobegon
IN THE NEWS

Lake Wobegon

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Sun staff | November 23, 1997
"Wobegon Boy," by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 305 pages. $24.95.Thomas Wolfe told us we can't go home again. Garrison Keillor knows the opposite is true: We can't ever really leave. Try as he might, and he has tried mightily enough to seek refuge in Denmark and New York City, Keillor keeps returning to Minnesota and Lake Wobegon, his fictional town that time forgot. This is a darker, less sentimental and surprisingly less satisfying trip than his previous journeys there - "Lake Wobegon Days," a popular novel, and "Leaving Home," a collection of essays patterned after the stories Keillor tells on his weekly radio show, "A Prairie Home Companion."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Liberty: A Novel of Lake Wobegon Garrison Keillor Viking / 257 pages / $25.95 Clint Bunsen lost his liberty when he was 23. "Good-looking, able to run up and down stairs two at a time, put away a 32-ounce porterhouse and baked potato and banana cream pie and go to sleep with no regrets," he planned to enroll at St. Joseph School of Art in Santa Barbara after he mustered out of the Navy. But he drove to Minnesota to say so long to his mom and dad, married the high school sweetheart he planned to leave behind and took over the family's used-car repair business.
Advertisement
NEWS
By RUTH WEDGWOOD | June 30, 1995
New York -- What the United Nations needs is some good managers. It's made a start in hiring Joe Connor, the former CEO of Price Waterhouse, who has set about trying to fix the U.N. personnel system and budget process.Mr. Connor is faced with a Lake Wobegon organization in which 9 out of 10 U.N. employees are rated ''outstanding'' by their risk-averse bosses, who want to avoid the three layers of appeals that follow an adverse rating.Political appointments at the Turtle Bay Secretariat have been determined by a rather vulgar rotation by region.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | September 9, 2007
Pontoon A Novel of Lake Wobegon By Garrison Keillor Viking/Penguin / 305 pages / $25.95 Not everyone finds Garrison Keillor and his Lake Wobegon series to be their cup of tea and Powdermilk Biscuits. But for those of us who grew up with the NPR radio serial A Prairie Home Companion, Lake Wobegon is a world apart - and much beloved. Keillor has been spinning his yarns in his breathy-yet-sonorous voice for over 30 years on Saturday evenings on NPR. I still have my Powdermilk Biscuits T-shirt from college and recall sitting with my mother, a big fan of Lake Wobegon, and listening to an episode here and there when I visited.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Liberty: A Novel of Lake Wobegon Garrison Keillor Viking / 257 pages / $25.95 Clint Bunsen lost his liberty when he was 23. "Good-looking, able to run up and down stairs two at a time, put away a 32-ounce porterhouse and baked potato and banana cream pie and go to sleep with no regrets," he planned to enroll at St. Joseph School of Art in Santa Barbara after he mustered out of the Navy. But he drove to Minnesota to say so long to his mom and dad, married the high school sweetheart he planned to leave behind and took over the family's used-car repair business.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | September 9, 2007
Pontoon A Novel of Lake Wobegon By Garrison Keillor Viking/Penguin / 305 pages / $25.95 Not everyone finds Garrison Keillor and his Lake Wobegon series to be their cup of tea and Powdermilk Biscuits. But for those of us who grew up with the NPR radio serial A Prairie Home Companion, Lake Wobegon is a world apart - and much beloved. Keillor has been spinning his yarns in his breathy-yet-sonorous voice for over 30 years on Saturday evenings on NPR. I still have my Powdermilk Biscuits T-shirt from college and recall sitting with my mother, a big fan of Lake Wobegon, and listening to an episode here and there when I visited.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 4, 1992
St. Paul, Minn.-- MY wife thinks it is barbaric to read a newspaper at the breakfast table and I tell her that I need a newspaper at the table, as a shield against the truth, but starting tomorrow morning I intend to reform.The great campaign of '92 is history.The champions have struck their poses: Bill Clinton as Youth, The Spirit of Tomorrow, and Ross Perot as The Man Who Means Bidness and George Bush as Not The Worst President There Ever Was, and any voter with a mind has made theirs up, and I have too.I like my guy and have for a long time and was anxious to vote for him and get him off my mind and think more about middle age, which I am in the thick of, and eat breakfast in peace.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | November 17, 1991
New York -- Time is running short for Garrison Keillor this Wednesday evening. He's closeted in a small room behind an auditorium on the West Side where, in a few minutes, he's scheduled to give a reading from his new novel, "WLT: a Radio Romance." He's good-naturedly fending off questions from an out-of-town interviewer, talking about favorite topics like Minnesota and radio and writing for the New Yorker. There are interlopers popping in -- people coordinating the reading who are meeting him for the first time, as well as obviously impressed glad-handers who couldn't resist the temptation to meet Mr. Prairie Home Companion himself.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
IN 1987, John J. Cannell, a West Virginia physician, discovered that all of the states were reporting above-average scores on standardized tests. Cannell called this the "Lake Wobegon effect," after Garrison Keillor's mythical town where "the men are good-looking, the women are strong, and all the children are above average." Cannell's discovery came to mind Monday, when the Education Trust, a Washington-based student advocacy group, said all but three states (Utah, Idaho and Oklahoma)
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 17, 1991
NEW YORK -- Garrison Keillor has asked Ulla Skaerved, his wife of six years, for a divorce, according to the New York Daily News."Garrison Keillor has just given his wife a one-way ticket to Lake Wobegon," columnist Richard Johnson wrote.The paper reports that his new love, known only as Dorrit, hasung on Mr. Keillor's "American Radio Company of the Air" radio show and has been tutoring him in Danish, his wife's first language.A spokesman for the American Public Radio network said Friday that Mr. Keillor had issued a "no comment" on the matter.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2003
IN 1987, John J. Cannell, a West Virginia physician, discovered that all of the states were reporting above-average scores on standardized tests. Cannell called this the "Lake Wobegon effect," after Garrison Keillor's mythical town where "the men are good-looking, the women are strong, and all the children are above average." Cannell's discovery came to mind Monday, when the Education Trust, a Washington-based student advocacy group, said all but three states (Utah, Idaho and Oklahoma)
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Sun staff | November 23, 1997
"Wobegon Boy," by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 305 pages. $24.95.Thomas Wolfe told us we can't go home again. Garrison Keillor knows the opposite is true: We can't ever really leave. Try as he might, and he has tried mightily enough to seek refuge in Denmark and New York City, Keillor keeps returning to Minnesota and Lake Wobegon, his fictional town that time forgot. This is a darker, less sentimental and surprisingly less satisfying trip than his previous journeys there - "Lake Wobegon Days," a popular novel, and "Leaving Home," a collection of essays patterned after the stories Keillor tells on his weekly radio show, "A Prairie Home Companion."
NEWS
By RUTH WEDGWOOD | June 30, 1995
New York -- What the United Nations needs is some good managers. It's made a start in hiring Joe Connor, the former CEO of Price Waterhouse, who has set about trying to fix the U.N. personnel system and budget process.Mr. Connor is faced with a Lake Wobegon organization in which 9 out of 10 U.N. employees are rated ''outstanding'' by their risk-averse bosses, who want to avoid the three layers of appeals that follow an adverse rating.Political appointments at the Turtle Bay Secretariat have been determined by a rather vulgar rotation by region.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 4, 1992
St. Paul, Minn.-- MY wife thinks it is barbaric to read a newspaper at the breakfast table and I tell her that I need a newspaper at the table, as a shield against the truth, but starting tomorrow morning I intend to reform.The great campaign of '92 is history.The champions have struck their poses: Bill Clinton as Youth, The Spirit of Tomorrow, and Ross Perot as The Man Who Means Bidness and George Bush as Not The Worst President There Ever Was, and any voter with a mind has made theirs up, and I have too.I like my guy and have for a long time and was anxious to vote for him and get him off my mind and think more about middle age, which I am in the thick of, and eat breakfast in peace.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | November 17, 1991
New York -- Time is running short for Garrison Keillor this Wednesday evening. He's closeted in a small room behind an auditorium on the West Side where, in a few minutes, he's scheduled to give a reading from his new novel, "WLT: a Radio Romance." He's good-naturedly fending off questions from an out-of-town interviewer, talking about favorite topics like Minnesota and radio and writing for the New Yorker. There are interlopers popping in -- people coordinating the reading who are meeting him for the first time, as well as obviously impressed glad-handers who couldn't resist the temptation to meet Mr. Prairie Home Companion himself.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 10, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Hmmm. Is actor Warren Beatty floating some trial political balloons?The star of "Bugsy" muses that he would consider going into public office, "but I certainly wouldn't do so with glee," as part of a show premiering this weekend on basic cable's E! Entertainment Television network.Oddly enough, however, in the "E! Saturday Special" appearance (at 8 p.m. tomorrow), Beatty is at England's Oxford University, participating in a question-and-answer session with students."It's not a nice life now to run for public office," he says, but if someone decided "I would be the most appropriate person to run, I guess I would have to do it."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
Garrison Keillor called back from a Kentucky hotel. Eastern Standard Time. "I think." Mr. Keillor wasn't perfectly sure of his whereabouts but was perfectly prepared to address the state of guyhood."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.