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Lake Roland

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NEWS
September 20, 1992
How fragile is Lake Roland Dam? At a state hearing earlier this year, Maryland's chief official for dam safety called the 131-year-old earthen structure in central Baltimore County "a major disaster waiting to happen."The official, Brad Iarossi, added, "We were lucky the dam did not fail" in the wake of two tropical storms, Agnes in 1972 and David in 1979. A 1984 study described a once-in-10,000-years storm that would smash the structure with a 9 1/2 -foot-high wall of water. An eight-foot-high wave would then rush down the Jones Falls for six miles; downtown Baltimore would be under four feet of water.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
For decades, Kay McConnell and her family joined those who lace up skates and take to Lake Roland in Robert E. Lee Park when winter freezes ice over the former reservoir. The McConnells' three children were on the ice as young as toddlers, one of them using an old sled as a walker of sorts. After measuring the ice to be at least 5 inches thick, with at least five days of sub-freezing temperatures, neighbors around the lake's north end would flock to the ice - so long as snowfall didn't make the surface too bumpy.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2008
Nestled along the outskirts of a woodsy park and a large lake are streets lined with charming homes that form a group of small neighborhoods collectively known as Lake Roland. The community backs to Robert E. Lee Memorial Park and is named for the lake, which a few of the secluded homes border. The boundaries loosely associated with the area include those streets along Lake Avenue, east of Falls Road and west of Charles Street and Bellona Avenue. The park serves as the northern boundary.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Elger Joseph Huber Sr., a retired stationary engineer who helped produce the distinctive blue Noxzema and Bromo-Seltzer glass containers and was later a school bus driver, died of respiratory failure Monday at Howard County General Hospital. The North Laurel resident was 87. Born in Baltimore, he grew up on the grounds of Lake Roland, where his father worked for the city's Division of Water Supply. The family of 13 lived in a house in what is now Robert E. Lee Park. He attended city public schools.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 9, 1992
Lake Roland goes to the dogs every morning and afternoon.Just after dawn and an hour before dusk, dog walkers converge on Robert E. Lee Park, the old Lake Roland reservoir just off Falls Road in Baltimore County.Within minutes, Conan the Rottweiler is running with Hannibal the yellow Labrador. Aloysius is battling with Finnian. Steamer and Clipper, the resident Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, are in the chilly water. Winston, Christobel, Dylan, Mookie, Digger, Elvis, DD, Giant, Casey and Jake are circling around the hillsides of what many believe is the area's finest greenswards.
NEWS
By John Fritze | April 24, 2008
State regulators have asked Baltimore to make emergency repairs to gates that regulate the flow of water from the Lake Roland Dam in Baltimore County, city and state officials said yesterday. A spokesman with the Maryland Department of the Environment said state inspectors noted bent rods on the dam's sluice gates last summer. The city has been working with an engineering firm to address the problem. "One of our inspectors noticed a bent rod," said Robert Ballinger, an MDE spokesman.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff William Thompson contributed to this story | April 4, 1991
The General Assembly has decided to roll the dice again on the future of the 130-year-old dam that keeps Lake Roland from turning central Baltimore into a lake.By appropriating less than one-third of the $3.5 million state share of the money required to rebuild the dam, the legislators are hoping that the old stone structure will hold for still another year. The state capital budget has been approved by both houses of the legislature, and small differences are now being worked out in conference committee.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano | January 22, 1992
Tropical storm Agnes took aim at Lake Roland Dam in 1972 and nearly knocked it flat.Seven years later, tropical storm David blew through and, again, a torrent of water almost made the historic dam history."
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 18, 1998
150 years ago in The SunJuly 18: Mortality among Children -- The report of the Board of Health for the past week, in another column, shows an unusually large mortality among children. Out of 133 deaths during the week, 88 were under 5 years of age, and of this number, 56 were under 1 year of age.100 years ago in The SunJuly 21: Mr. Thomas H. Blick, who has been living near the border of Lake Roland since last January, said yesterday that the lake should be either cleaned out or abandoned.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writer | March 18, 1992
It's almost noon. Lake Roland Dam has already started to deteriorate. About 2,000 men, women and children in the area below the dam are being evacuated.Others have been evacuated already. The state has issued a flash flood warning; three to four inches of rain are falling every hour.The Maryland National Guard has been alerted and is standing by to quell looting that is expected in the evacuated areas of Montgomery and Prince George's counties and Baltimore City. The damage from Hurricane Zelda already has surpassed $33 million.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
Marguerite M. "Peggy" Owens, a homemaker and volunteer, died Aug. 25 at her home in Naples, Fla., of complications from an infection. She was 87. Marguerite Martin, the daughter of a Chesapeake Bay ferry purser and a homemaker, was born in Royal Oak on the Eastern Shore and moved in 1928 to Roland Park. After graduating in 1941 from Eastern High School, she worked as a secretary in the Office of Strategic Services at Aberdeen Proving Ground during World War II. In 1946, she married John B. Owens, who was one of the founders of the Owens Yacht Co. For years, the couple lived at a home on Hollins Avenue that overlooked Lake Roland.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 12, 2009
Walter W. Windsor, a retired accountant and World War II veteran, died of heart disease Dec. 1 at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 89 and had lived in Towson and Mount Washington. Born in Baltimore and raised on Harlem Avenue, he was a 1938 City College graduate. During World War II, he served in the Army and was stationed in England, where he was a bomb loader and worked in telecommunications. He received a business degree from the University of Baltimore and was a certified public accountant.
NEWS
November 24, 2009
It's welcome news that Baltimore County is taking over operations and maintenance of Robert E. Lee Park, with plans to devote more attention to this hidden gem than the city, which actually owns the land, has been able to offer. The most visible sign of that change is the replacement of the pedestrian bridge just downstream from the dam on Lake Roland; two weeks ago, work crews tore down the old, structurally unstable bridge, and a new one will be built over the coming months. But the county has more plans in mind in the hope that by improving the facilities it can double park use from about 41,000 visitors a year to 100,000 or more.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Baltimore County will use $6 million in local and state funds to begin the first phase of improvements to Robert E. Lee Park in the Woodbrook area. The plan calls for restoring the 415-acre parcel into a regional facility to serve the county's central neighborhoods. The park will eventually include a nature center, dog park, hiking and biking trails, fountains, benches, restrooms and improved access to its most valuable asset, Lake Roland. The park, owned by Baltimore City but located within the county, remains closed.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2008
Nestled along the outskirts of a woodsy park and a large lake are streets lined with charming homes that form a group of small neighborhoods collectively known as Lake Roland. The community backs to Robert E. Lee Memorial Park and is named for the lake, which a few of the secluded homes border. The boundaries loosely associated with the area include those streets along Lake Avenue, east of Falls Road and west of Charles Street and Bellona Avenue. The park serves as the northern boundary.
NEWS
By John Fritze | April 24, 2008
State regulators have asked Baltimore to make emergency repairs to gates that regulate the flow of water from the Lake Roland Dam in Baltimore County, city and state officials said yesterday. A spokesman with the Maryland Department of the Environment said state inspectors noted bent rods on the dam's sluice gates last summer. The city has been working with an engineering firm to address the problem. "One of our inspectors noticed a bent rod," said Robert Ballinger, an MDE spokesman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
Marguerite M. "Peggy" Owens, a homemaker and volunteer, died Aug. 25 at her home in Naples, Fla., of complications from an infection. She was 87. Marguerite Martin, the daughter of a Chesapeake Bay ferry purser and a homemaker, was born in Royal Oak on the Eastern Shore and moved in 1928 to Roland Park. After graduating in 1941 from Eastern High School, she worked as a secretary in the Office of Strategic Services at Aberdeen Proving Ground during World War II. In 1946, she married John B. Owens, who was one of the founders of the Owens Yacht Co. For years, the couple lived at a home on Hollins Avenue that overlooked Lake Roland.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 12, 2009
Walter W. Windsor, a retired accountant and World War II veteran, died of heart disease Dec. 1 at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 89 and had lived in Towson and Mount Washington. Born in Baltimore and raised on Harlem Avenue, he was a 1938 City College graduate. During World War II, he served in the Army and was stationed in England, where he was a bomb loader and worked in telecommunications. He received a business degree from the University of Baltimore and was a certified public accountant.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,sun reporter | December 9, 2007
Walk out onto the front porch of this Ruxton manor home, step up to the tee box, square your club and take a swing. Don't worry, no windows are in danger on this nearly four-acre property set amid a wooded landscape just outside the city line. But you might end up in the water hazard that is Roland Run, an offshoot of Lake Roland, just across the way from the 12-hole executive golf course on the property. Built in 1896 as a country estate, the property likely overlooked Lake Roland at one point in its more than 100-year history.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | May 3, 2003
BALTIMORE IS a great place to live, but you'd better have been born into the sixth generation of a local family to know its secrets. This town will not unfold itself to just anybody. I'm not sure that what I'm about to recommend will satisfy all your curiosity about old Baltimore, but it will be a fine way to spend three successive Sunday afternoons in May. I speak of a trio of interesting house tours, one tomorrow at St. Paul and 22nd streets (the Old Goucher neighborhood), another in Fells Point on May 11 and the other, just over the Baltimore County line, in Bare Hills, adjacent to Lake Roland, on May 18. I have long been a sucker for house tours.
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