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By Mike Steere and Mike Steere,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1997
Desert diving sounds like a laugh line, like "Ski Jamaica."But the joke may be on scuba enthusiasts who come to the Southwest and bypass the underwater adventuring in lakes Powell and Mead. These huge, man-made reservoirs on the Colorado River lie, respectively, upstream and downstream from the Colorado's Grand Canyon.Divers in these waters swoop and hover in flooded gorges, alongside vertical walls and pinnacles that soar hundreds of feet. "It's like flying in the Grand Canyon," one aficionado says.
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NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - As the sun begins to set, light pours from the sky like water from a tipped pitcher. The Wasatch Mountains glow mauve and pink against the deepening gray-blue dusk. Antelope Island seems to rise from the mist. But where the fading rays of light should be glinting off darkening waters, there is no water to be seen, only cracked gray mud, with grasses turning brown along beaches where waves should be lapping. The Great Salt Lake has disappeared here, just outside Salt Lake City, along the first mile of the causeway leading from the mainland to Antelope Island, a refuge for coyotes, bison, bobcats and antelope.
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NEWS
By Gary Polakovic and Gary Polakovic,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
PAGE, Ariz. - The houseboat trip to Lake Powell went without a hitch last fall until Ken Kidder, 42, of Denver dived under the boat, the Notorious, to retrieve an anchor rope tangled in a propeller. He sank and drowned. "He said, `Hey, there's an air pocket under here,' and that was the last anyone ever heard from him," recalled Jim Gabriel, 59, Kidder's father-in-law, who was aboard the boat. "Four men dove in to find him, and I'm leaning over the back of that deck calling his name and calling his name, and it's like every feeling I had in my body just drained out of me, and I went numb.
NEWS
By Gary Polakovic and Gary Polakovic,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
PAGE, Ariz. - The houseboat trip to Lake Powell went without a hitch last fall until Ken Kidder, 42, of Denver dived under the boat, the Notorious, to retrieve an anchor rope tangled in a propeller. He sank and drowned. "He said, `Hey, there's an air pocket under here,' and that was the last anyone ever heard from him," recalled Jim Gabriel, 59, Kidder's father-in-law, who was aboard the boat. "Four men dove in to find him, and I'm leaning over the back of that deck calling his name and calling his name, and it's like every feeling I had in my body just drained out of me, and I went numb.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - As the sun begins to set, light pours from the sky like water from a tipped pitcher. The Wasatch Mountains glow mauve and pink against the deepening gray-blue dusk. Antelope Island seems to rise from the mist. But where the fading rays of light should be glinting off darkening waters, there is no water to be seen, only cracked gray mud, with grasses turning brown along beaches where waves should be lapping. The Great Salt Lake has disappeared here, just outside Salt Lake City, along the first mile of the causeway leading from the mainland to Antelope Island, a refuge for coyotes, bison, bobcats and antelope.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
A Memorable Place A baby rhino means hope in Zimbabwe By Gina Rumore SPECIAL TO THE SUN Through the 10-foot-tall pens made of scrawny mopane tree trunks, I catch a glimpse of a massive baby. Though less than a year old, it is already larger than the biggest pig I have ever seen -- though its body shape doesn't appear to be all that different. With a guard's permission, I wriggle my arm between two of the tree trunks and hold out my hand for the rhino to inspect. With its muscular upper lip, the baby probes the palm of my hand.
TRAVEL
March 14, 1999
A MEMORABLE PLACEBy Leslie EbertSpecial to the SunSince I was a child, I've always looked forward to August, when the family would pack up for our annual trip to Delaware's Rehoboth Beach. My parents packed us five kids up and headed for "the Jersey Street" beach house that smelled of pine cones and a woodsy, salty smell embedded in the big, screened-in porch out front. We would smell the salty sea air miles away and already taste the corn on the cob and bluefish dinners in our mouths.As my mother grabbed the baby, the rest of us little kids would jump frantically out of the car to check whether the house was as we'd left it the year before.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 9, 1997
Donna Potter's enthusiasm for life aboard ship wasn't dimmed a bit by high winds, cramped quarters or even rain."It was like being part of a big family," explained the 10-year-old, who lives in East Islip, N.Y. "You don't get lonely."She spent a lot of her time aboard the Windjammer sailing ship off the Maine coast watching the chef. "I like to cook," she explained.Six-year-old Scott Malhiet, meanwhile, was just as happy on the Delta Steamboat cruise he took on the Mississippi River with his family.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | August 2, 1992
Q: What are the details on the price-fixing settlement for people who flew on American, Delta, United and USAir between January 1988 and June 30, 1992?A: Those airlines agreed on June 22 to pay about $450 million to passengers who bought a ticket for domestic travel between Jan. 1, 1988, and June 30, 1992. On July 15, Continental Airlines also agreed to take part in the settlement, adding about $8 million to the package.Those who think they qualify for a share of the settlement should write to Airline Antitrust Litigation, P.O. Box 209, Philadelphia, Pa. 19107, giving an address where you can be reached.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 4, 2002
PAGE, Ariz. - For 40 years, Glen Canyon Dam has stood as a brawny symbol of growth in the Southwest, taming the flow of the Colorado River and supplying electricity to booming communities. But the dam is putting an environmental stranglehold on a national icon just downstream: the Grand Canyon. Like a giant concrete stopper, the dam has plugged the seasonal ebb and flow of sediment and water temperature. As a result, four native fish are gone and a fifth - the humpback chub - is disappearing and may not have enough adult fish left to sustain the species.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
A Memorable Place A baby rhino means hope in Zimbabwe By Gina Rumore SPECIAL TO THE SUN Through the 10-foot-tall pens made of scrawny mopane tree trunks, I catch a glimpse of a massive baby. Though less than a year old, it is already larger than the biggest pig I have ever seen -- though its body shape doesn't appear to be all that different. With a guard's permission, I wriggle my arm between two of the tree trunks and hold out my hand for the rhino to inspect. With its muscular upper lip, the baby probes the palm of my hand.
TRAVEL
March 14, 1999
A MEMORABLE PLACEBy Leslie EbertSpecial to the SunSince I was a child, I've always looked forward to August, when the family would pack up for our annual trip to Delaware's Rehoboth Beach. My parents packed us five kids up and headed for "the Jersey Street" beach house that smelled of pine cones and a woodsy, salty smell embedded in the big, screened-in porch out front. We would smell the salty sea air miles away and already taste the corn on the cob and bluefish dinners in our mouths.As my mother grabbed the baby, the rest of us little kids would jump frantically out of the car to check whether the house was as we'd left it the year before.
FEATURES
By Mike Steere and Mike Steere,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 9, 1997
Desert diving sounds like a laugh line, like "Ski Jamaica."But the joke may be on scuba enthusiasts who come to the Southwest and bypass the underwater adventuring in lakes Powell and Mead. These huge, man-made reservoirs on the Colorado River lie, respectively, upstream and downstream from the Colorado's Grand Canyon.Divers in these waters swoop and hover in flooded gorges, alongside vertical walls and pinnacles that soar hundreds of feet. "It's like flying in the Grand Canyon," one aficionado says.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 9, 1997
Donna Potter's enthusiasm for life aboard ship wasn't dimmed a bit by high winds, cramped quarters or even rain."It was like being part of a big family," explained the 10-year-old, who lives in East Islip, N.Y. "You don't get lonely."She spent a lot of her time aboard the Windjammer sailing ship off the Maine coast watching the chef. "I like to cook," she explained.Six-year-old Scott Malhiet, meanwhile, was just as happy on the Delta Steamboat cruise he took on the Mississippi River with his family.
NEWS
March 8, 1991
The Dust Bowl is an enduring image of pain for the families which fled west to escape during the Great Depression. It rises anew with the drought now choking Western states.Most of the focus is on California, whose population has zoomed to almost 30 million and whose farmers produce half the nation's vegetables. The worst dust pockets, however, are in Wyoming, Idaho and the valleys of Washington and Oregon east of the Cascade Mountains.Southern California, with its 15 million people, has plans to get more water from Colorado River reservoirs.
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