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Lake Pontchartrain

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By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
Lake Pontchartrain, the brackish estuary that flooded New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, is likely to suffer environmental damage as water fouled by sewage, bacteria and corpses is pumped from city's streets back into the estuary, officials said yesterday. "There is no question that this water is contaminated, and it will have an impact on the lake," said Jean Kelly, spokeswoman for the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality. "We've got dead bodies, cars, human waste, household hazardous chemicals, all kinds of pollutants in that water."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
At the halfway mark between the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina last year and the beginning of the 2006 hurricane season June 1, the Army Corps of Engineers has completed 16 percent of its planned repairs to New Orleans' battered flood protection system, according to corps representatives. The corps says its work is on track for restoring the system to its pre-hurricane strength by the June 1 deadline, but in the meantime, many groups that have studied the disaster are coming up with proposals of their own that they say could be cheaper, faster or stronger.
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SPORTS
October 22, 2005
QUESTION OF THE DAY NEXT QUESTION Which Super Bowl champion had the better defense - the 1985 Bears or the 2000 Ravens? Selected responses to today's question will be printed Monday on The Kickoff page. Please e-mail your answer (about 25 words) to sports@baltsun.com by 3 p.m. tomorrow. Include your name, address and a daytime telephone number for verification purposes. Good morning -- Leo Mazzone -- We look forward to your rocking in the dugout. Good thing Sam Perlozzo is more than a nodding acquaintance.
NEWS
October 24, 2005
Some uncommonly practical suggestions emerged in Washington last week to cushion the blow of Katrina-related spending on the nation's already deeply in-debt government. Of course, they were quickly swatted away. Our favorite called for transferring the $223 million approved last summer to build Alaska's much-ridiculed "bridge to nowhere" and use the money instead to repair the storm-damaged twin span over Lake Pontchartrain - a major access route to New Orleans. Alaskans suggested this one. Meanwhile, tight-fisted Oklahoma Republican Sen. Tom Coburn tossed some other ideas into the mix, including slicing from the housing budget $950,000 for a museum parking lot in Omaha, $500,000 for a sculpture park in Seattle and $200,000 for a new animal shelter in Westerly, R.I., and spending that money instead on housing the vastly increased ranks of the homeless.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
With a 300-foot section of an earth-and-concrete levee on New Orleans' 17th Street Canal gushing water into Jefferson Parish yesterday, civil engineers and the Army Corps of Engineers faced the daunting task of stopping the leak, then cleaning up the water and the mess left behind. Plans were to use a giant Chinook helicopter to drop rocks or containers filled with sand as a stopgap measure to close the levee break. The federal government stood poised to bring in high-volume pumps to help drain the city, thousands of mobile homes to house its residents and front loaders and dump trucks to haul away mountains of debris to be buried or burned.
NEWS
October 24, 2005
Some uncommonly practical suggestions emerged in Washington last week to cushion the blow of Katrina-related spending on the nation's already deeply in-debt government. Of course, they were quickly swatted away. Our favorite called for transferring the $223 million approved last summer to build Alaska's much-ridiculed "bridge to nowhere" and use the money instead to repair the storm-damaged twin span over Lake Pontchartrain - a major access route to New Orleans. Alaskans suggested this one. Meanwhile, tight-fisted Oklahoma Republican Sen. Tom Coburn tossed some other ideas into the mix, including slicing from the housing budget $950,000 for a museum parking lot in Omaha, $500,000 for a sculpture park in Seattle and $200,000 for a new animal shelter in Westerly, R.I., and spending that money instead on housing the vastly increased ranks of the homeless.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
At the halfway mark between the onslaught of Hurricane Katrina last year and the beginning of the 2006 hurricane season June 1, the Army Corps of Engineers has completed 16 percent of its planned repairs to New Orleans' battered flood protection system, according to corps representatives. The corps says its work is on track for restoring the system to its pre-hurricane strength by the June 1 deadline, but in the meantime, many groups that have studied the disaster are coming up with proposals of their own that they say could be cheaper, faster or stronger.
NEWS
By Allan Kanner | September 22, 2005
PLAQUEMINE, LA. -- Toxic floodwaters are draining into Lake Pontchartrain, enabling rescue workers to recover New Orleans' dead. Millions of Americans watch with horror, and wonder how could this have happened in the richest country on earth. At the same time, an unneeded $231 million bridge to a sparsely inhabited part of Alaska is to be built. Yes, there is a connection. The bridge stands as a monument to a corrupt Washington culture - a culture that has mismanaged and plundered our nation's treasury.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Frank D. Roylance and Alec MacGillis and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
Hurricane Katrina might have started as a natural disaster, but the subsequent flooding of New Orleans was a human failure, brought on by people who set the stage for destruction and by leaders who, despite ample warning, did not act to prevent it. The timeline of responsibility extends back nearly three centuries, from the decision to site the city in a strategic but geologically vulnerable spot, to the generations-long effort to bend the flow of...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | July 24, 2007
Carleton Mitchell, a three-time winner of the Newport-to-Bermuda sailing cup, died of heart disease July 16 at his Key Biscayne, Fla., home. The former Annapolis resident was 96. He sailed his boat, the 39-foot yawl Finisterre, in the 635-mile race and won Bermuda Cup trophies in 1956, 1958 and 1960. "A man of means who could afford to get his exercise from coupon clipping, he likes nothing better than to pit his frail sailboat against a heaving sea," said a 1956 Evening Sun article. Born in Louisiana, he learned to sail on Lake Pontchartrain in New Orleans.
SPORTS
October 22, 2005
QUESTION OF THE DAY NEXT QUESTION Which Super Bowl champion had the better defense - the 1985 Bears or the 2000 Ravens? Selected responses to today's question will be printed Monday on The Kickoff page. Please e-mail your answer (about 25 words) to sports@baltsun.com by 3 p.m. tomorrow. Include your name, address and a daytime telephone number for verification purposes. Good morning -- Leo Mazzone -- We look forward to your rocking in the dugout. Good thing Sam Perlozzo is more than a nodding acquaintance.
NEWS
By Allan Kanner | September 22, 2005
PLAQUEMINE, LA. -- Toxic floodwaters are draining into Lake Pontchartrain, enabling rescue workers to recover New Orleans' dead. Millions of Americans watch with horror, and wonder how could this have happened in the richest country on earth. At the same time, an unneeded $231 million bridge to a sparsely inhabited part of Alaska is to be built. Yes, there is a connection. The bridge stands as a monument to a corrupt Washington culture - a culture that has mismanaged and plundered our nation's treasury.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
Lake Pontchartrain, the brackish estuary that flooded New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, is likely to suffer environmental damage as water fouled by sewage, bacteria and corpses is pumped from city's streets back into the estuary, officials said yesterday. "There is no question that this water is contaminated, and it will have an impact on the lake," said Jean Kelly, spokeswoman for the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality. "We've got dead bodies, cars, human waste, household hazardous chemicals, all kinds of pollutants in that water."
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Frank D. Roylance and Alec MacGillis and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
Hurricane Katrina might have started as a natural disaster, but the subsequent flooding of New Orleans was a human failure, brought on by people who set the stage for destruction and by leaders who, despite ample warning, did not act to prevent it. The timeline of responsibility extends back nearly three centuries, from the decision to site the city in a strategic but geologically vulnerable spot, to the generations-long effort to bend the flow of...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
With a 300-foot section of an earth-and-concrete levee on New Orleans' 17th Street Canal gushing water into Jefferson Parish yesterday, civil engineers and the Army Corps of Engineers faced the daunting task of stopping the leak, then cleaning up the water and the mess left behind. Plans were to use a giant Chinook helicopter to drop rocks or containers filled with sand as a stopgap measure to close the levee break. The federal government stood poised to bring in high-volume pumps to help drain the city, thousands of mobile homes to house its residents and front loaders and dump trucks to haul away mountains of debris to be buried or burned.
NEWS
July 12, 2006
Louis Gilliland Wingate, a retired General Electric engineer, Navy commander and sailing enthusiast, died of cancer Thursday at his Ruxton home. He was 80. A New Orleans native, Mr. Wingate enlisted in the Navy and served during World War II aboard the USS Macomb in the Atlantic before earning his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from Tulane University in 1949. Mr. Wingate joined General Electric Co.'s engineering training program and held engineering and sales management positions for 37 years in Philadelphia, Erie, Pa., and Baltimore, where he moved in 1973 and retired 13 years later.
NEWS
By Nancy Noyes and Nancy Noyes,Contributing writer | June 13, 1991
It's been a long time coming, but last week the U.S. Naval Academy'sIntercollegiate Sailing Team scored an impressive coup.Team members conquered all of the other top collegiate dinghy teams in the country and won the National Intercollegiate Championships at Tulane University in New Orleans. It was the first time in the event's history that Navy swept all three events of the regatta.Racing was in 420s out of Southern Yacht Club on Lake Pontchartrain.First was the Women's Nationals, which was won by Navy when A Division skipper Susie Minton, with Julie Kohl as her crew, topped out that division for the second year in a row. An excellent performance by B skipper Cynthia Williams clinched the women's title.
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