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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 20, 2001
CHICAGO - The missing mother of week-old quadruplets was pulled from Lake Michigan by divers late Wednesday, a short distance from where police found her car. The body of Aracely Erives, 27, who was last seen by her husband Tuesday morning when she left their Southwest Side home to go for a drive in her burgundy Nissan, was positively identified by relatives about 9 p.m., police said. Erives' husband, Jesus Sandoval, told police she suffered from postpartum depression after the birth July 12 of the quadruplets, said police spokesman Robert Cargie.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | August 7, 2008
Space Cadets! If you missed Tuesday's flyover by the International Space Station, you'll get another shot tonight as the enormous contraption passes overhead again on nearly the same trajectory. A very bright ISS and its crew of three will rise in the northwest at 8:48 p.m. as they pass over Lake Michigan. They'll climb very high overhead (243 miles above Baltimore), passing the bright star Arcturus at 8:51 p.m. Then they'll head southeast off the Carolina capes, skirting brilliant Jupiter and disappearing at 8:53 p.m.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | August 7, 2008
Space Cadets! If you missed Tuesday's flyover by the International Space Station, you'll get another shot tonight as the enormous contraption passes overhead again on nearly the same trajectory. A very bright ISS and its crew of three will rise in the northwest at 8:48 p.m. as they pass over Lake Michigan. They'll climb very high overhead (243 miles above Baltimore), passing the bright star Arcturus at 8:51 p.m. Then they'll head southeast off the Carolina capes, skirting brilliant Jupiter and disappearing at 8:53 p.m.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 4, 2002
When Stephen Salny was an economics major at Lake Forest College in Illinois, he liked to take a break from classes and drive around town, a tony community 30 miles from Chicago on the north shore of Lake Michigan. Salny marveled at the beauty of the homes in Lake Forest - the sense of proportion they had, the elegant details, the variety of styles. He became intrigued when he learned from a classmate that all of the houses he liked most were designed by the same architect, David Adler.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
MILWAUKEE - Milwaukee is building a promise to itself in concrete and steel and glass and lots of white paint. From different angles, the new $100 million addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum resembles a ship with unfurled sails nosing into Lake Michigan, a plant unfolding its leaves, or the bleached skeleton of a giant bird. The new wing designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava is scheduled to be completed in July and might be a triumph of engineering as much of as aesthetics.
FEATURES
By Rick Sylvain and Rick Sylvain,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 7, 1994
What a transformation is washing over the one-time Beach and Six-Pack Capital of the World!You can feel it while browsing the high-end shops and galleries of Butler Street. Cruising the Kalamazoo River past white forests -- not of birch trees but of yacht masts. Paying for your room and feeling pangs of sticker shock.Saugatuck, Mich., is going upscale.Seventeen shops have opened in the past year. Designer labels hang from more racks than you can count.Where 10 years ago there were eight bed and breakfasts, now there are 26 in a town of fewer than 1,000 residents.
NEWS
April 15, 1992
Chicago is no accident. Two mighty river systems, the St. Lawrence and Mississippi, nearly touched. It was an easy canoe portage from the little Chicago River (leading to Lake Michigan and the St. Lawrence) to the Des Plaines River (flowing to the Mississippi and Gulf of Mexico). Whoever held this spot controlled the heartland of North America: First the French, then the Mayors Daley.Like a statue with feet of clay or a palace built on sand, the American city stands on muck, landfill, crumbling masonry, disintegrating concrete, rusted iron, leaking mains, cracking conduit, ancient tunnels, relics of abandoned technology.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 13, 2000
He "wowed" them in Chicago last month. Now, Woo Daves hopes to wow bass anglers while he's in Charles County. Daves, fresh off his victory in the BASS Masters Classic, will be fishing the Potomac River Aug. 23-26 as the BASS Master Top 150 begins a new season. The Virginia native and two-time national champion says beating 45 other anglers for the $100,000 top prize in Chicago was "the most exciting fishing day of my life." At 54, Daves was the oldest competitor on Lake Michigan. But he won with grit - battling 3- to 4-foot waves whipped up by strong winds out of the north- and caginess.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | November 4, 2002
When Stephen Salny was an economics major at Lake Forest College in Illinois, he liked to take a break from classes and drive around town, a tony community 30 miles from Chicago on the north shore of Lake Michigan. Salny marveled at the beauty of the homes in Lake Forest - the sense of proportion they had, the elegant details, the variety of styles. He became intrigued when he learned from a classmate that all of the houses he liked most were designed by the same architect, David Adler.
TRAVEL
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Sun Staff | July 18, 1999
"A steep sandy road ran down the hill to the bay through the timber. From Smith's back door you could look out across the woods that ran down the lake and across the bay. It was very beautiful in the spring and summer, the bay blue and bright and usually white caps on the lake out beyond the point from the breeze blowing from Charlevoix and Lake Michigan."-- From "Up in Michigan"by Ernest HemingwayHORTON BAY, Mich. -- The first thing you should know about Ernest Hemingway and Horton Bay -- and maybe even about this sliver of northern Michigan, where the water is clear and blue, and where the wooded hills roll like gentle waves, is this: He got it right.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 20, 2001
CHICAGO - The missing mother of week-old quadruplets was pulled from Lake Michigan by divers late Wednesday, a short distance from where police found her car. The body of Aracely Erives, 27, who was last seen by her husband Tuesday morning when she left their Southwest Side home to go for a drive in her burgundy Nissan, was positively identified by relatives about 9 p.m., police said. Erives' husband, Jesus Sandoval, told police she suffered from postpartum depression after the birth July 12 of the quadruplets, said police spokesman Robert Cargie.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2001
MILWAUKEE - Milwaukee is building a promise to itself in concrete and steel and glass and lots of white paint. From different angles, the new $100 million addition to the Milwaukee Art Museum resembles a ship with unfurled sails nosing into Lake Michigan, a plant unfolding its leaves, or the bleached skeleton of a giant bird. The new wing designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava is scheduled to be completed in July and might be a triumph of engineering as much of as aesthetics.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 13, 2000
He "wowed" them in Chicago last month. Now, Woo Daves hopes to wow bass anglers while he's in Charles County. Daves, fresh off his victory in the BASS Masters Classic, will be fishing the Potomac River Aug. 23-26 as the BASS Master Top 150 begins a new season. The Virginia native and two-time national champion says beating 45 other anglers for the $100,000 top prize in Chicago was "the most exciting fishing day of my life." At 54, Daves was the oldest competitor on Lake Michigan. But he won with grit - battling 3- to 4-foot waves whipped up by strong winds out of the north- and caginess.
TRAVEL
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Sun Staff | July 18, 1999
"A steep sandy road ran down the hill to the bay through the timber. From Smith's back door you could look out across the woods that ran down the lake and across the bay. It was very beautiful in the spring and summer, the bay blue and bright and usually white caps on the lake out beyond the point from the breeze blowing from Charlevoix and Lake Michigan."-- From "Up in Michigan"by Ernest HemingwayHORTON BAY, Mich. -- The first thing you should know about Ernest Hemingway and Horton Bay -- and maybe even about this sliver of northern Michigan, where the water is clear and blue, and where the wooded hills roll like gentle waves, is this: He got it right.
FEATURES
By Rick Sylvain and Rick Sylvain,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 7, 1994
What a transformation is washing over the one-time Beach and Six-Pack Capital of the World!You can feel it while browsing the high-end shops and galleries of Butler Street. Cruising the Kalamazoo River past white forests -- not of birch trees but of yacht masts. Paying for your room and feeling pangs of sticker shock.Saugatuck, Mich., is going upscale.Seventeen shops have opened in the past year. Designer labels hang from more racks than you can count.Where 10 years ago there were eight bed and breakfasts, now there are 26 in a town of fewer than 1,000 residents.
NEWS
April 15, 1992
Chicago is no accident. Two mighty river systems, the St. Lawrence and Mississippi, nearly touched. It was an easy canoe portage from the little Chicago River (leading to Lake Michigan and the St. Lawrence) to the Des Plaines River (flowing to the Mississippi and Gulf of Mexico). Whoever held this spot controlled the heartland of North America: First the French, then the Mayors Daley.Like a statue with feet of clay or a palace built on sand, the American city stands on muck, landfill, crumbling masonry, disintegrating concrete, rusted iron, leaking mains, cracking conduit, ancient tunnels, relics of abandoned technology.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 10, 1991
On three bluffs high above Lake Michigan in Waukegan, Ill., an archaeologist has found places where Indians fashioned tools from stones, perhaps more than 3,000 years ago.What makes the finding potentially significant is that the highlands, cut through by ravines, have never been disturbed by plows or other farming implements, said archaeologist Rochelle Lurie."
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | March 10, 1991
On three bluffs high above Lake Michigan in Waukegan, Ill., an archaeologist has found places where Indians fashioned tools from stones, perhaps more than 3,000 years ago.What makes the finding potentially significant is that the highlands, cut through by ravines, have never been disturbed by plows or other farming implements, said archaeologist Rochelle Lurie."
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