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By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment has categorized the damage done to downtown Columbia's Lake Kittamaqundi by a diesel fuel leak as minimal, even though an estimated 500 to 600 gallons of fuel entered the lake, according to an office spokesperson. Jay Apperson, deputy director for MDE office of communications, said that cleanup of the spill, which occurred at around 4 p.m. on April 14, is expected to last a week, although containment for the spill will remain in place for approximately four weeks.
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | April 16, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment has categorized the damage done to downtown Columbia's Lake Kittamaqundi by a diesel fuel leak as minimal, even though an estimated 500 to 600 gallons of fuel entered the lake, according to an office spokesperson. Jay Apperson, deputy director for MDE office of communications, said that cleanup of the spill, which occurred at around 4 p.m. on April 14, is expected to last a week, although containment for the spill will remain in place for approximately four weeks.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
The Columbia Association is moving toward approving half the additional money needed to dredge Lake Kittamaqundi to the depth originally planned after heavy storms in the past four years dumped unexpectedly high levels of silt into it. Thursday night, a CA committee of two board members — Suzanne Waller of Town Center and Kathleen Dragovich of Dorsey's Search — accepted a staff proposal to recommend that the full board add $1.3 million...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
There is peace on Lake Kittamaqundi. The teenage brothers who write the entertaining 2 Dudes Who Love Food blog posted all the way back in early February about their visit to Rudy's Mediterranean Grill & Diner. The newish big-menu serves breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week but things really get interesting after 4 p.m., when Rudy's rolls out its Turkish menu. The 2 Dudes had traveled to Turkey last year, and they were pretty pleased with what they found at Rudy's.
EXPLORE
October 25, 2011
• $467,000 for work on three sections of dock at Lake Kittamaqundi • $330,000 for completing a loop around Lake Kittamaqundi • $235,000 for replacing six tennis courts in Owen Brown • $350,000 for replacing tennis clubhouse in Owen Brown • $310,000 for adding a new spa and other amenities to Stevens Forest Pool • $550,000 for major renovations to Homespun Pond in Owen Brown Source: Columbia Association ...
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
It was true when I wrote it, but it wasn't for long. In Tuesday's post I said that the Columbia Association had finally opened the southwest corner of the pathway around Lake Kittamaqundi, which had been fenced off for most of the previous year while crews did some repair work to the ground at that end of the lake. Well, the chain-link fence is no longer there, but not long after my post went up, so did a big hunk of concrete barrier and a length of orange silt fencing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
After tolling the time for decades, Columbia's iconic lakefront bell tower will soon be taken down due to safety concerns, according to an announcement from the Columbia Association. The bell tower is now roped off at the end of a wooden dock at Lake Kittamaqundi, and will be dismantled sometime in late May or early June, according to CA officials. It will be rebuilt once the planned redevelopment of the area gets underway in several years. Discussion of tower removal has been underway for four years, but a recent examination by Century Engineering showed what were called "major deficiencies" in the structure, though it is not thought to pose any imminent danger.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
Seeking outside help to preserve Lake Kittamaqundi, Columbia officials gave Howard County Executive James N. Robey a lakeside lesson yesterday in flood plains and sediment build-up. Columbia Association President Deborah O. McCarty led Robey on a 60-minute tour of the 27-acre Town Center lake that the Rouse Co. built more than 30 years ago and that remains a symbol of the community's suburban aesthetic. At issue is the build-up of sediment -- a natural process that has been exacerbated by the lake's position in a flood plain next to the Little Patuxent River.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
There is peace on Lake Kittamaqundi. The teenage brothers who write the entertaining 2 Dudes Who Love Food blog posted all the way back in early February about their visit to Rudy's Mediterranean Grill & Diner. The newish big-menu serves breakfast, lunch and dinner seven days a week but things really get interesting after 4 p.m., when Rudy's rolls out its Turkish menu. The 2 Dudes had traveled to Turkey last year, and they were pretty pleased with what they found at Rudy's.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Visitors who expect to see clear waters at Columbia's Lake Elkhorn after a multimillion-dollar dredging is complete in December will likely find algae and vines thriving again next spring, despite rising cost estimates for removing decades' worth of sediment. Without dredging, Columbia's man-made lakes would eventually fill in with sediment and plants, reverting over decades to the stream valleys they once were. The two largest, 37-acre Elkhorn, and 27-acre Lake Kittamaqundi, have never been completely dredged.
EXPLORE
October 25, 2011
• $467,000 for work on three sections of dock at Lake Kittamaqundi • $330,000 for completing a loop around Lake Kittamaqundi • $235,000 for replacing six tennis courts in Owen Brown • $350,000 for replacing tennis clubhouse in Owen Brown • $310,000 for adding a new spa and other amenities to Stevens Forest Pool • $550,000 for major renovations to Homespun Pond in Owen Brown Source: Columbia Association ...
EXPLORE
September 1, 2011
It was true when I wrote it, but it wasn't for long. In Tuesday's post I said that the Columbia Association had finally opened the southwest corner of the pathway around Lake Kittamaqundi, which had been fenced off for most of the previous year while crews did some repair work to the ground at that end of the lake. Well, the chain-link fence is no longer there, but not long after my post went up, so did a big hunk of concrete barrier and a length of orange silt fencing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2010
The Columbia Association is moving toward approving half the additional money needed to dredge Lake Kittamaqundi to the depth originally planned after heavy storms in the past four years dumped unexpectedly high levels of silt into it. Thursday night, a CA committee of two board members — Suzanne Waller of Town Center and Kathleen Dragovich of Dorsey's Search — accepted a staff proposal to recommend that the full board add $1.3 million to the...
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Visitors who expect to see clear waters at Columbia's Lake Elkhorn after a multimillion-dollar dredging is complete in December will likely find algae and vines thriving again next spring, despite rising cost estimates for removing decades' worth of sediment. Without dredging, Columbia's man-made lakes would eventually fill in with sediment and plants, reverting over decades to the stream valleys they once were. The two largest, 37-acre Elkhorn, and 27-acre Lake Kittamaqundi, have never been completely dredged.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
After 25 years working often literally in Maryland's trenches trying to help restore waterways that feed into the Chesapeake Bay, 53-year-old John L. McCoy came back to Columbia for a very special job. "I've come home," said the beefy, crew-cut and mustached new Columbia Association watershed manager. Five years short of a full state pension, McCoy, of Clarksville, resigned his Department of Natural Resources job to return to Columbia, where he had worked part-time for CA as a college student.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2010
After tolling the time for decades, Columbia's iconic lakefront bell tower will soon be taken down due to safety concerns, according to an announcement from the Columbia Association. The bell tower is now roped off at the end of a wooden dock at Lake Kittamaqundi, and will be dismantled sometime in late May or early June, according to CA officials. It will be rebuilt once the planned redevelopment of the area gets underway in several years. Discussion of tower removal has been underway for four years, but a recent examination by Century Engineering showed what were called "major deficiencies" in the structure, though it is not thought to pose any imminent danger.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
After 25 years working often literally in Maryland's trenches trying to help restore waterways that feed into the Chesapeake Bay, 53-year-old John L. McCoy came back to Columbia for a very special job. "I've come home," said the beefy, crew-cut and mustached new Columbia Association watershed manager. Five years short of a full state pension, McCoy, of Clarksville, resigned his Department of Natural Resources job to return to Columbia, where he had worked part-time for CA as a college student.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
Columbia is no paradise for trumpling swans.The disappearance of a trumpling swan from Columbia's Lake Kittamaqundi in September and the spray-painting of a swan earlier this month have forced researchers to move the lake's four resident swans to Virginia.The swans were rounded up yesterday morning by Columbia Association workers to be transported to Airlie Center in central Virginia, a preserve and home to the Swan Research Program."I couldn't be happier to see them go. I was getting very worried about their safety," said Helen Thompson, a member of the Columbia Waterfowl Committee, a wildlife protection group.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
When asked to use a full-sized door as a canvas, some artists created designs with animals, flowers or abstract shapes. Columbia artist Linda Press painted a picture of another door. Her painting depicts a door opening onto a view of the Tuscany countryside in Italy, and, painted on the other side of the real door, is a view looking into a house. "It just seemed made for this door project to have a door to paint in the door," she said. "Then it gives you a nice three-dimensional quality.
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