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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The crisis may have eased in Toledo , but the toxic algae in Lake Erie that contaminated the water supply for 500,000 people in Ohio continues to plague lakes and rivers across the country, including here in Maryland. Lake Williston, a swimming hole for a Girl Scout camp in Caroline County, is off limits this summer because of  dangerous levels of a toxin in its water.  So is 75-acre Lake Needwood in Rock Creek Regional Park in Montgomery County.  Same for Northwest Creek, a 100-acre impoundment on Kent Island in Queen Anne's County.
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FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The crisis may have eased in Toledo , but the toxic algae in Lake Erie that contaminated the water supply for 500,000 people in Ohio continues to plague lakes and rivers across the country, including here in Maryland. Lake Williston, a swimming hole for a Girl Scout camp in Caroline County, is off limits this summer because of  dangerous levels of a toxin in its water.  So is 75-acre Lake Needwood in Rock Creek Regional Park in Montgomery County.  Same for Northwest Creek, a 100-acre impoundment on Kent Island in Queen Anne's County.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 2006
CLEVELAND -- They surf in Cleveland because they must. They surf with 2-inch icicles clinging to their wet suits, through stinging hail and overpowering wind and waves brown with human waste. They work nights to spend their winter days scouting surf. They are watermen on an inland sea. Given its industrial past, Cleveland largely turns its back to Lake Erie, lining the coast with power plants, a freeway and mounds of iron ore to feed its steel factories. The shore is especially deserted in winter, when strong winds and waves pummel the land.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Thomas C. Gillmer, a noted naval architect and ship historian who designed both Prides of Baltimore, the schooner Lady Maryland and other period replica vessels, died of complications from dementia Dec. 16 at the Hospice of the Chesapeake's Mandarin House in Harwood. He was 98. Mr. Gillmer was born and raised in Warren, Ohio, not far from Lake Erie, where as a youngster he fell in love with boats and the water. "I first made model boats when I was a kid. I had a friend, an older fellow, who was from Down East, somewhere in Nova Scotia.
NEWS
By Jim Robbins and Jim Robbins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 2002
This fall is turning out to be the deadliest yet for loons, ducks and other birds that encounter a natural outbreak of a rare form of the nerve toxin botulism in Lake Erie. Ward Stone, director of the New York Department of Environmental Conservation Pathology Laboratory in Delmar, N.Y., which studies the dead birds, said that over the last two weeks his staff had picked up more than 5,500 birds along the shores of Lake Erie in western New York, between Buffalo and Dunkirk, including 126 loons, 4,500 long-tailed ducks, geese, grebes, mergansers, scaups and many types of gulls.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 1997
CLEVELAND - The latest threat to the fragile health of Lake Erie doesn't come from chemical spills, algae blooms or raw sewage.It comes from a gray, 6-inch fish.This is a fish with an appetite - for the eggs of other fish and for mussels that clean the water.It's a fish that reproduces faster than a high-tech photocopier - capable of spawning every 20 days and overwhelming similar species that provide key links in the food chain.It's a fish that wasn't supposed to be here - but hitched a ride on a transatlantic freighter from the Black or Caspian Sea.Meet the round goby, an aggressive, bottom-feeding fish with buglike eyes and thick lips that make it look as though it's smiling.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2003
A power transmission loop surrounding Lake Erie became the focus yesterday of the investigation into the biggest blackout in U.S. history. But the chain of events that led to the shutdown of a vast electrical grid in mere seconds, cutting power to about 50 million people in the Northeastern United States and Canada, remained a mystery to energy experts. They said it could take weeks to pinpoint a cause. Yesterday, as utilities were able to restore more than half the electricity lost in cities from Toronto to New York, investigators were assessing the causes and consequences of an extraordinary reversal in the flow of power on the "Lake Erie loop" that occurred just after 4 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | February 23, 2008
Joe Bollinger of Glen Burnie read that Lake Erie had frozen. "Which of the remaining four Great Lakes would be the next to freeze, and has it ever happened?" Lake Erie is the first to freeze because it's the shallowest. Old timers in Erie, Pa., recall driving across the ice to Canada. Lake Ontario would be next. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab says 90 percent of the five lakes' surface has frozen in extreme winters, such as the three beginning in 1976-77.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2002
BUFFALO, N.Y. - There probably is no other person who has had a greater impact on the city of Buffalo than Robert G. Wilmers. He's helped turn around a poorly performing urban elementary school, saved the philharmonic from bankruptcy, preserved a house built by Frank Lloyd Wright, worked to shave millions from the city's budget and pledged millions from his own pocket to improve the local zoo. Yet, most people in Buffalo don't know who he is. "Robert...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 19, 2006
PUT-IN-BAY, Ohio -- Two years ago, Sophia Schroeder had the best birthday of her life. She stood on frozen Lake Erie near this town on South Bass Island and ate ice cream. Her father dragged her sled across the ice behind his snowmobile. Later they ate birthday cake around a huge bonfire built right on the ice. "That was my favorite birthday party ever," said Sophia, now 7. This year, Sophia spent her birthday inside, playing video games with friends. "It's really boring here without ice," she said.
SPORTS
By Patrick Gutierrez | October 18, 2008
Morgan State (3-3, 1-1 MEAC) @Howard (1-4, 0-2 MEAC) Time: 1 p.m. Site: Greene Stadium, Washington Radio: 88.9 FM Outlook: The Bears gained a season-high 450 yards in last week's win over North Carolina A&T. Howard is coming off a loss to previously winless Winston-Salem State. Backup QB Mario Melton relieved Carlton Jackson in the second quarter of the Bears' win last week, and both players could play today. Howard has no such predicament, as QB Floyd Haiger enters the game as the top-rated passer in the MEAC, having thrown for 1,476 yards and 10 touchdowns.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | February 23, 2008
Joe Bollinger of Glen Burnie read that Lake Erie had frozen. "Which of the remaining four Great Lakes would be the next to freeze, and has it ever happened?" Lake Erie is the first to freeze because it's the shallowest. Old timers in Erie, Pa., recall driving across the ice to Canada. Lake Ontario would be next. The Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab says 90 percent of the five lakes' surface has frozen in extreme winters, such as the three beginning in 1976-77.
SPORTS
By [FROM STAFF REPORTS] | January 22, 2008
State Coppin State remained winless in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference with a 63-48 loss to visiting Florida A&M (6-11, 2-3) last night. The Eagles (4-15, 0-5) are off to their worst start in MEAC play and have lost 13 of their past 14 games. Tywain McKee scored 15 points to lead Coppin State, and Robert Pressey added 11 points and nine rebounds. Lake Erie 88, Frostburg State 66 -- The Storm (10-5, 6-2 Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference) had five players score in double figures and shot 58 percent from the field, including 6-for-7 on three-pointers in the second half to pull away.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | May 6, 2007
The temperature plunged quickly to about 35 degrees and 50 mph squalls jostled the small boat carrying two anglers. The conditions on Lake Erie prompted the Coast Guard to issue a small-craft warning. The father-and-son fishing duo of Thomas and James Rufenacht figured they had seen the worst - then thunder clapped and a driving sleet began, followed by snowfall. Though experienced fishermen taking part in a competition on the lake that day last October gave up and headed for shore, the Rufenachts persisted.
NEWS
By Michael Hawthorne and Michael Hawthorne,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 19, 2006
CHICAGO -- The idea of turning the Great Lakes into a giant shooting range didn't sit well with boaters, anglers or politicians, especially since it almost happened with little public notice. Surrendering to a barrage of complaints, the U.S. Coast Guard yesterday dropped plans to conduct routine target practice with boat-mounted machine guns in 34 areas throughout the lakes. Coast Guard officials said they made a mistake by not adequately informing the public about their proposal, which was so unusual it required changes to a treaty with Canada that dates to the War of 1812.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 10, 2006
CLEVELAND -- They surf in Cleveland because they must. They surf with 2-inch icicles clinging to their wet suits, through stinging hail and overpowering wind and waves brown with human waste. They work nights to spend their winter days scouting surf. They are watermen on an inland sea. Given its industrial past, Cleveland largely turns its back to Lake Erie, lining the coast with power plants, a freeway and mounds of iron ore to feed its steel factories. The shore is especially deserted in winter, when strong winds and waves pummel the land.
NEWS
By Deborah Williams | March 20, 2001
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- There may be a few Baltimore residents who were disappointed that the "Perfect Storm of 2001" turned out to be a dud. As the winter of 2000-2001 ends with the first day of spring today, Baltimoreans might like to know what they missed. Although Buffalo has even an international reputation as the Snow King, Syracuse, N.Y., is tops among all northeastern cities, with more than 184.7 inches so far this year, as of Friday. Its comfortable lead over second-place Buffalo -- a mere 143.4 inches -- makes Syracuse a lock for this year's Golden Snowball Award.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | May 6, 2007
The temperature plunged quickly to about 35 degrees and 50 mph squalls jostled the small boat carrying two anglers. The conditions on Lake Erie prompted the Coast Guard to issue a small-craft warning. The father-and-son fishing duo of Thomas and James Rufenacht figured they had seen the worst - then thunder clapped and a driving sleet began, followed by snowfall. Though experienced fishermen taking part in a competition on the lake that day last October gave up and headed for shore, the Rufenachts persisted.
TRAVEL
By BOB DOWNING and BOB DOWNING,AKRON BEACON JOURNAL | May 21, 2006
LAKE CITY, PA. / / Erie Bluffs State Park is Pennsylvania's newest and the 117th in the state system. The still-wild tract 12 miles west of Erie and just east of the Ohio line is long on potential and short on amenities. There are no facilities, no trails, no toilets, no signs. There is a small unmarked parking lot off state Route 5, but that's just about it. The nature-based park -- it was dedicated by Gov. Edward G. Rendell in mid-2004 -- features the largest tract of undeveloped land on Lake Erie along Pennsylvania's 60 miles of shoreline.
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