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By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1998
BURLINGTON, Vt. -- As Lake Champlain completes its first week as the newest member of the Great Lakes, people who live alongside America's sixth-largest body of fresh water are dealing with a mild winter and a higher profile.Vigorously, but politely, they defend the 14-mile wide, 125-mile-long lake -- that extends from Whitehall, N.Y., to Winooski, Vt. -- from critics who see its new-found Greatness as undeserved.Happily and humorously, lake dwellers contemplate new road signs, new T-shirts ("I went to the Great Lakes but ended up in Vermont with this lousy T-shirt")
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EXPLORE
August 3, 2011
100 Years Ago An article in the Aug. 5, 1911, edition of The Argus reported on some hardy residents' ambitious plans for a summer vacation adventure in the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York . Messrs . Benjamin Whitely and Harold Phillips of Catonsville, and Mr. Frederick R. Huber , of Baltimore, left last Friday for a month's canoeing in the lakes of Northern New York, and from accounts of their previous experiences...
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NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | March 5, 1995
75 Years Ago* Fire, supposedly caused by a defective chimney flue, destroyed the fine country residence of Harry E. Feldmeyer situated on the outskirts of Eastport, Annapolis. -- The Sun, April 10, 1920.* Building construction at the Naval Academy will result in the new seamanship building being named Luce Hall, while the old Luce Hall will be renamed Macdonough Hall after Capt. Thomas Macdonough, who commanded the naval forces at the battle of Lake Champlain. -- The Sun, April 12, 1920.* Senator Hiram W. Johnson, of California, one of the leading candidates for the Republican presidential nomination, will speak 12:30 today in front of the courthouse in Annapolis.
TRAVEL
October 5, 2008
I live in Pikesville, and my family recently visited Fort Ticonderoga in upstate New York. The Fort, which is located at the southern tip of Lake Champlain and northern tip of Lake George and dates back to Revolutionary times, played a pivotal role when the French and British were fighting for strategic control of waterways to the north - the St. Lawrence River - and to the south - the Hudson River. We visited late in the day as a fife and drum corps in period costume played taps and lowered the flags that fly over the Fort.
TRAVEL
December 24, 2000
From Lake Champlain in Vermont to the Gokyo Valley of Nepal, from Antarctica to the jungles of Cambodia, and from the sidewalks of Nice to the wilderness of Zimbabwe, The Sun's readers have logged some serious travel miles this year -- and they have the photos to prove it. Every Sunday, the Travel Section's Personal Journeys page features trips taken by our readers and includes a Best Shot. As 2000 draws to a close, what better way to thank our many contributors than by offering a Best of the Best Shots from the past year?
TRAVEL
October 5, 2008
I live in Pikesville, and my family recently visited Fort Ticonderoga in upstate New York. The Fort, which is located at the southern tip of Lake Champlain and northern tip of Lake George and dates back to Revolutionary times, played a pivotal role when the French and British were fighting for strategic control of waterways to the north - the St. Lawrence River - and to the south - the Hudson River. We visited late in the day as a fife and drum corps in period costume played taps and lowered the flags that fly over the Fort.
NEWS
By Jane Gross and Jane Gross,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 1998
PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. - As the ferry made its way from Vermont to New York, across the choppy waters of Lake Champlain, Kirk Polhemus, a deckhand, issued a judgment heard over and over these days in the North Country. "It may not be a great lake," he said, "but it's the best lake."These words are heard so often here that it seems the Chamber of Commerce has written the script for discussing the dispute over a federal law that briefly made Champlain an official Great Lake, the equal of Superior, Huron, Erie, Ontario and Michigan.
TRAVEL
December 10, 2000
A MEMORABLE PLACE Friendships on the trail By Peggy Stout SPECIAL TO THE SUN In the midst of my two-month journey hiking the Appalachian Trail from New York to Maine this summer, climbing the magnificent White Mountains of New Hampshire and staying in the "hut" system seemed like a vacation within a vacation. As I approached the White Mountains, my husband met me in Franconia Notch, N.H., the first leg of the Presidential Range. Recognizing the unpredictability of the weather in that region, especially above the tree line.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
Rumors of peace were in the air when four Banshee jets took off from the aircraft carrier USS Lake Champlain for a combat mission deep into North Korea. It was the morning of July 26, 1953. The next day at 10:01 a.m. the delegates meeting at the Panmunjom "truce village" would, in fact, begin signing the armistice that ended combat in Korea. Fighting, officially, stopped at 10 p.m. July 27, Monday in Korea, Sunday in the United States. Flying north on the 26th were Stanley M. Montunnas, the flight leader, then a lieutenant commander, his wingman, Ensign W.K. "Monk" McManus, Lt. William M. Russell and his wingman, Ensign Edwin Nash Broyles Jr. Broyles, 27, was from Baltimore.
EXPLORE
August 3, 2011
100 Years Ago An article in the Aug. 5, 1911, edition of The Argus reported on some hardy residents' ambitious plans for a summer vacation adventure in the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York . Messrs . Benjamin Whitely and Harold Phillips of Catonsville, and Mr. Frederick R. Huber , of Baltimore, left last Friday for a month's canoeing in the lakes of Northern New York, and from accounts of their previous experiences...
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2003
Rumors of peace were in the air when four Banshee jets took off from the aircraft carrier USS Lake Champlain for a combat mission deep into North Korea. It was the morning of July 26, 1953. The next day at 10:01 a.m. the delegates meeting at the Panmunjom "truce village" would, in fact, begin signing the armistice that ended combat in Korea. Fighting, officially, stopped at 10 p.m. July 27, Monday in Korea, Sunday in the United States. Flying north on the 26th were Stanley M. Montunnas, the flight leader, then a lieutenant commander, his wingman, Ensign W.K. "Monk" McManus, Lt. William M. Russell and his wingman, Ensign Edwin Nash Broyles Jr. Broyles, 27, was from Baltimore.
TRAVEL
December 24, 2000
From Lake Champlain in Vermont to the Gokyo Valley of Nepal, from Antarctica to the jungles of Cambodia, and from the sidewalks of Nice to the wilderness of Zimbabwe, The Sun's readers have logged some serious travel miles this year -- and they have the photos to prove it. Every Sunday, the Travel Section's Personal Journeys page features trips taken by our readers and includes a Best Shot. As 2000 draws to a close, what better way to thank our many contributors than by offering a Best of the Best Shots from the past year?
TRAVEL
December 10, 2000
A MEMORABLE PLACE Friendships on the trail By Peggy Stout SPECIAL TO THE SUN In the midst of my two-month journey hiking the Appalachian Trail from New York to Maine this summer, climbing the magnificent White Mountains of New Hampshire and staying in the "hut" system seemed like a vacation within a vacation. As I approached the White Mountains, my husband met me in Franconia Notch, N.H., the first leg of the Presidential Range. Recognizing the unpredictability of the weather in that region, especially above the tree line.
NEWS
By Jane Gross and Jane Gross,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 1998
PLATTSBURGH, N.Y. - As the ferry made its way from Vermont to New York, across the choppy waters of Lake Champlain, Kirk Polhemus, a deckhand, issued a judgment heard over and over these days in the North Country. "It may not be a great lake," he said, "but it's the best lake."These words are heard so often here that it seems the Chamber of Commerce has written the script for discussing the dispute over a federal law that briefly made Champlain an official Great Lake, the equal of Superior, Huron, Erie, Ontario and Michigan.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 1998
BURLINGTON, Vt. -- As Lake Champlain completes its first week as the newest member of the Great Lakes, people who live alongside America's sixth-largest body of fresh water are dealing with a mild winter and a higher profile.Vigorously, but politely, they defend the 14-mile wide, 125-mile-long lake -- that extends from Whitehall, N.Y., to Winooski, Vt. -- from critics who see its new-found Greatness as undeserved.Happily and humorously, lake dwellers contemplate new road signs, new T-shirts ("I went to the Great Lakes but ended up in Vermont with this lousy T-shirt")
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | March 5, 1995
75 Years Ago* Fire, supposedly caused by a defective chimney flue, destroyed the fine country residence of Harry E. Feldmeyer situated on the outskirts of Eastport, Annapolis. -- The Sun, April 10, 1920.* Building construction at the Naval Academy will result in the new seamanship building being named Luce Hall, while the old Luce Hall will be renamed Macdonough Hall after Capt. Thomas Macdonough, who commanded the naval forces at the battle of Lake Champlain. -- The Sun, April 12, 1920.* Senator Hiram W. Johnson, of California, one of the leading candidates for the Republican presidential nomination, will speak 12:30 today in front of the courthouse in Annapolis.
NEWS
By George F. Will | March 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Has New England lost its once formidable mind? Evidently, given the goings-on at the University of Connecticut, and with a senator from Vermont. Nykesha Sales, a senior on U-Conn.'s women's basketball team, was one point shy of the school record when she suffered a season-ending injury. Her coach is just a man, but a '90s man -- caring and sensitive. He felt her pain and got Villanova's coach to agree that at the beginning of the game, Villanova would stand around while Ms. Sales hobbled to the basket for an uncontested layup.
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