Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLaid Off Workers
IN THE NEWS

Laid Off Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 5, 1993
Forty-four of the 392 Baltimore County workers laid off in February are seeking reinstatement and back pay through a suit to be filed today.The suit charges that County Executive Roger B. Hayden did not follow proper procedures in making the layoffs and other job cuts Feb. 11 and 12.People whose jobs were eliminated were told to leave their offices immediately, though they were given severance pay and help in finding new jobs.The suit also charges breach of contract, said Towson attorney J. Carroll Holzer, who is representing the group.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
Laid-off Hostess Brands workers, including 192 in Maryland, are eligible for federal trade assistance benefits, the U.S. Department of Labor said Tuesday. The Trade Adjustment Assistance program offers retraining help and other aid, coordinated by state workforce agencies, to people who lost their jobs as a result of foreign trade. The Labor Department said its investigation showed "increased imports of baked products contributed importantly to the company's sales declines and worker separations.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | February 4, 1991
Dawn Zeigler was preparing for her wedding when she learned that the Pentagon had canceled the Navy's A-12 stealth fighter.A quality-assurance engineer at Westinghouse Electronic Systems Group in Linthicum for only 15 months, she knew her job might be at risk."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
An Anne Arundel County company that specializes in highway excavation and vegetation control warned Maryland regulators that it will lay off 75 employees because a contract was not renewed, the state said Tuesday. Mercier's Inc. in Harmans told the state that the cuts would come at the end of the year, but it expects many of the laid-off workers will land jobs with the new contractor. The company could not be reached for comment. jhopkins@baltsun.com twitter.com/jsmithhopkins
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | December 21, 1993
The Baltimore County Council last night approved a measure that would allow three veteran workers to buy the government pensions for which they were only months away from qualifying when they were laid off in February."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
Bill Milligan is used to helping unemployed bank vice presidents, clerk typists and construction workers find work. Now he'll have to help some of his own -- state employees who'll be losing their jobs because of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's budget cuts.Milligan is a job finder at a Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development placement office in Annapolis. He's also part of DEED's Rapid Response Team, a specialized crew trained to deal with massive layoffs and plant closings.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
Numbers-- The number of newly laid off workers filing claims for unemployment benefits increased to 336,000 last week, a gain of 7,000.
NEWS
December 8, 1994
An article yesterday incorrectly reported the notice given laid off workers at Merry-Go-Round Enterprises Inc. The workers were given 60 days' notice.The sun regrets the error.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2012
An Anne Arundel County company that specializes in highway excavation and vegetation control warned Maryland regulators that it will lay off 75 employees because a contract was not renewed, the state said Tuesday. Mercier's Inc. in Harmans told the state that the cuts would come at the end of the year, but it expects many of the laid-off workers will land jobs with the new contractor. The company could not be reached for comment. jhopkins@baltsun.com twitter.com/jsmithhopkins
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Adams and Marilyn Adams,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 7, 1992
As the recession and economic restructuring continue to cut a swath through the white-collar work force, many companies are hiring specialized consultants to soften the blow.Counselors who offer "career transition" services say corporate shutdowns and downsizings have generated a demand for their work.Such consultants help laid-off managers and executives cope with their loss and learn how to search for a new job in a tight economy.Employers who hire such consultants help not only those laid off. They also help the frightened ones who fear that they might be next.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
Forrest Martin is looking at the same help-wanted listings as all the other Sparrows Point workers, the jobs with wages of $10 an hour, $13, $15. The jobs that could mean a pay cut of half — or more — from his steel mill days. But Martin, 31, isn't exactly in the same boat as everybody else. Half of the mill's workers started at Sparrows Point before he was born. Hundreds of its laid-off workers are eligible, if not able, to retire. Martin is part of a smaller group — about 280 of the 1,700 hourly employees — who are in their 20s or 30s and have most of their working lives ahead of them.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Baltimore County will hold sessions next week for Sparrows Point workers and others affected by the steel mill owner's bankruptcy. The workshops will offer resources for the laid-off workers, particularly information about federal aid for retraining and other benefits available to them through the Trade Adjustment Assistance Program. State and local agencies will have staff on hand to answer questions. The sessions will run from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sept. 4 and 6 at the training conference center just inside the Sparrows Point complex.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Northrop Grumman Corp. will lay off 90 workers in Maryland as part of a nationwide cutback of 400 workers in the company's Electronic Systems sector, the company reported Tuesday. Plans to eliminate as many as 800 jobs nationwide were announced in October. The defense contractor, one of the largest private employers in Maryland, is trimming the workforce based on the business outlook for Electronic Systems and in anticipation of defense spending cuts, the company said. The laid-off workers, who received notice Tuesday, will work through the end of January, said Jack Martin Jr., a spokesman for Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Baltimore County is holding information fairs this week to assist the more than 1,000 workers who have been laid off from the Sparrows Point steel mill as part of a temporary idling of the primary steelmaking operations. The fairs will be held Thursday and Friday at the Severstal Sparrows Point Conference and Training Center, with morning and afternoon sessions each day. Each session will include presentations about unemployment insurance, federal Trade Adjustment Act benefits, union benefits and health care benefits.  Other sessions will address how laid off workers can cope with stress and give information on housing assistance and foreclosure prevention, career services and educational opportunities.  The Russian owner of the plant, Severstal, announced last year that the mill's blast furnace and hot strip mill will not be in operation until at least March.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
Mildred Miller was just notified that her unemployment benefits will be cut off two weeks before Christmas. She can't think about it without breaking down. "I don't know what I'm going to do; I really don't know," Miller said Monday, her eyes welling with tears as she scanned job listings at Baltimore County's work force development center in Essex. "I don't want to get evicted. If we get on the street, I don't know where we'll be. " The Middle River resident, a single mother with a 6-year-old son, is one of thousands in Maryland and about 2 million nationwide whose payments will be phased out in December if the federally funded emergency unemployment compensation program expires Tuesday as planned.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2010
At the height of the recession last year, Deanna Ross was busy training the newly unemployed and others how to form support groups to cope with mental illness in these stressful times. Then Ross lost her own job as a regional field worker at the National Alliance on Mental Illness in December. Since then, the 42-year-old Columbia mother with bipolar disorder has been struggling against the reflex to withdraw from society and with fears of becoming homeless. For Ross and other workers — both on the unemployment rolls and in the workplace — the Great Recession is taking a steep psychological toll.
BUSINESS
By John Lippert and John Lippert,Knight-Ridder News Service Kim Clark of The Sun's business news staff contributed to this report | March 23, 1991
DETROIT -- General Motors Corp. has spent $497.9 million to pay laid-off workers since October, according to participants in a meeting in Dearborn, Mich., Thursday of 300 United Auto Workers officials from GM plants around the country.Even so, UAW officials believe that the $4.3 billion GM set aside to maintain the incomes of laid-off workers will last as long as it's supposed to -- until September 1993 -- unless the recession worsens.Last month, however, GM told the union it expects the $4.3 billion to beexhausted by the summer of 1992, unless the economy improves, according to a GM official who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 9, 1992
The local General Motors minivan plant is scheduled to resume production tomorrow morning, which will make it one of the last factories to recall its workers after a crippling strike in Lordstown, Ohio.Yesterday afternoon, the local plant began notifying about 2,800 workers to report to work with the start of the first shift at 6 tomorrow. Those workers were laid off Aug. 31 after a shortage of parts caused a halt in production at the Baltimore plant.Terry Youngerman, a spokesman for the local plant, said about 75 to 100 skilled workers would return to work later tonight to prepare the factory for an early-morning start-up.
NEWS
January 14, 2010
Well, the Republicans are at it again. This time they want to deny help to part-time workers who lose their jobs. What's next on their agenda? Beating puppy dogs with baseball bats? Maryland Del. Donna Stifler -- in a January 12 Associated Press article -- claims that employers are not hiring because too much of their money is going into the state's unemployment insurance trust fund. But according to the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation's website, the current cost to employers is $187 to $1,147.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.