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NEWS
March 8, 1999
SINCE winning an alleged 62 percent of the vote in Nigeria's election Feb. 27, President-elect Olusegun Obasanjo has said all the right things.These include a promise of "an open and fair and transparent government"; a mandate to "rebuild this nation"; and a plea that "together, we will strive to bequeath to the next generation a truly democratic system of governance."The words were needed. General Obasanjo's own Yoruba people in the southwest, including the great commercial city of Lagos, favored his opponent.
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BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2008
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will lose its flights to Africa in May, when North American Airlines cuts service to Lagos, Nigeria, and Accra, Ghana. It is the latest blow to BWI's efforts to bolster its international service, after Icelandair's pullout last month. It also means the large West African immigrant population in the Baltimore-Washington region will now have to travel further for flights to their home countries. Rising fuel costs, coupled with competition from routes Delta Air Lines recently launched from New York to West Africa, have forced North American Airlines to shut down all commercial service, company spokesman Steve Forsyth said.
NEWS
January 3, 1995
Mohamed Siad BarreExiled Somali leaderMaj. Gen. Mohamed Siad Barre, who was overthrown as president of Somalia in 1991 after ruling that impoverished African country for more than 20 years, died on Monday in exile in Lagos, Nigeria."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 24, 1994
LAGOS, Nigeria -- A diplomatic initiative by President Clinton to help resolve Nigeria's political paralysis has generated protests here by human rights campaigners who say that the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Mr. Clinton's special envoy, may have aligned himself too closely with this country's military government to be a neutral mediator.The U.S. Embassy in Lagos announced Thursday that Mr. Jackson and a delegation of State Department and national security officials were expected to travel to Nigeria in the next few days.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 3, 1994
It is obvious that you do not mess around with his royal highness, Prince Jaiyesimi, a member of the Ijede ruling family in Lagos, Nigeria.That's what Gerry Gross, a Chicago Transit Authority bus driver who is not of royal birth, will soon be finding out.Gross is one of the alleged villains in a $120 million federal lawsuit that Prince Jaiyesimi brought against the city of Chicago, the CTA and the Police Department because they hurt his royal feelings real...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 26, 1999
IKORODU, Nigeria -- For the fourth and final time, Kehind Adewole will wait in the tropical sun tomorrow to vote an end to military rule, joining millions of his countrymen in an act they hope will save this most populous African nation.The transition from army dictatorship to civilian democracy here has been a carefully paced process, and Adewole has participated in each step.First, the civil servant and father of three went to the polling station on the veranda of an ornate but dowdy green house at Ogunsanya and Alison streets to elect a local council for this down-at-its-heels township Dec. 5.On Jan. 9, he was back to elect a provincial governor.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | December 24, 1992
Max Chibundu, professor of law, paces at the front of a smal room, his hands clasped behind his back.He's doing his best to lead his 24 first-year students through the complicated world of civil pleadings.It's a typical scene at the University of Maryland Law School -- the students looking overworked, the teacher in a tweed jacket.Except for one student who has moved his coffee cup aside and rests his head on the table. Another student flashes hand signals to help a beleaguered friend who has no idea what answer Mr. Chibundu is waiting for.Mr.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2000
SANTIAGO, Chile - In October 1973, when Augusto Pinochet was beginning to make his mark on Chile, death rode a Puma helicopter. The aircraft carried a six-member army squad led by a general who was a special emissary of Pinochet. The squad roamed the north killing political prisoners, at least 72 in all. Even some officers were horrified. Gen. Joaquin Lagos, then a regional commander in the city of Antofagasta, recalled: "A general of the republic had been my guest for a few hours and ... ordered the murder of 14 prisoners, prisoners who had in their majority surrendered voluntarily, trusting in me. What a barbarity, massacring 14 defenseless prisoners behind my back."
SPORTS
By Julie Cart and Julie Cart,Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1992
ZARAGOZA, Spain -- Historic Romareda Stadium, host to yesterday's first-round Olympic soccer match between the United States and Kuwait, gave little sign of Olympic hoopla. Instead, the stadium bore all the trappings of a patriotic pep rally.The signs hung around the stadium read "Kuwait Thanks USA." Kuwaiti fans wore their country's colors -- green, red, white and black -- but around their shoulders they draped American flags. They chanted and cheered for the U.S. soccer team, something even Americans seldom do.After the game, the traditional sporting handshake likewise escalated into a love fest.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2004
DAKAR, Senegal - An attack by a Christian militia against a mainly Muslim town in central Nigeria has left several hundred people dead, according to news reports from the area. The incident, which took place Sunday in the village of Yelwa, is the latest eruption in a long-standing dispute between herders, who are Muslims from the Hausa-Fulani ethnic group, and farmers, who are ethnic Tarok Christians. Reuters and Agence France-Presse quoted two Muslim community leaders as saying that 630 bodies have been buried since the attack.
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