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By Edward Gunts | November 4, 1990
A corner property overlooking historic Lafayette Square is the site of Baltimore's newest affordable-housing development, a three-story condominium complex with prices starting at $59,000.Developers Paul Bryant and Alex Sotir launched sales last week for the 23-unit development, the second of two they have worked on in the Lafayette Square area.Lafayette Square Phase II, as the new development is called, is also one of the first projects funded by Baltimore's Community Development Financing Corp.
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NEWS
June 26, 2013
Happy Independence Day, dear readers! Flags, banners and bunting throughout Havre de Grace shout red, white and blue as we prepare for our nation's birthday and our Independence Day. The Havre de Grace carnival will operate in Tydings Park July 2 to 6. On July 6 (Saturday) at 2 p.m., the traditional parade will traverse Union Avenue from Lafayette Square (Legion Square) to Tydings Park. A concert will commence in Tydings Park at 7 p.m. followed by a spectacular fireworks display at dark (about 9:15 p.m.)
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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
Baltimore City Council President Mary Pat Clarke and Councilman Lawrence A. Bell, D-4th, are threatening to set aside part of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's proposed budget to resurrect library service in Lafayette Square four years after the Pratt abandoned the poor, West Baltimore neighborhood.Mr. Bell, who represents Lafayette Square, said he will introduce an amendment this week to Pratt allocations in the city budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The strategy has strong support from Mrs. Clarke.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 24, 2013
While several homeless people gathered on benches on the plaza outside City Hall on Palm Sunday, a crowd of 60 churchgoers from congregations around Baltimore stood at the front door to pray for them - and for other needs facing the community - at the 10th annual Blessing of the City. "Thank you for letting us pray for the homeless today," said Kealiel Collins, 11, a parishioner of Metropolitan United Methodist Church in Lafayette Square, to God and the crowd. "Give the homeless their place in the world.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 1, 2004
Although many older Baltimore neighborhoods have made comebacks recently in terms of sales prices and livability, Lafayette Square in West Baltimore hasn't yet made the list. A group of preservationists has been working to change that situation by mounting a photographic exhibit that celebrates the area's architectural character. Lafayette Square: Recognize, Respect, Restore is the title of the show, which includes more than 50 large-format photographs by James Rosenthal and supplemental information from the Historic American Buildings Survey and Goucher College historic preservation student Angela Shaeffer.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | July 8, 2011
Volunteer archaeologists are descending on leafy Lafayette Square in West Baltimore this weekend in an effort to uncover relics from Camp Hoffman, a Union army encampment that stood there during the Civil War. Just hours into the project Friday, while dodging rain showers and swarms of June bugs, the diggers had already turned up fragments of mid-19th-century tableware and decorative wrought iron, nails, birdshot and even a piece of an old pocket watch....
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | December 9, 1991
Baltimoreans in Canton, Gardenville, O'Donnell Heights, the Hollins Market area, and Pimlico could learn a lot from Twilah Scarborough.And they've got about 90 days to learn it if they want to keep their neighborhood libraries open.In 1989, when the Enoch Pratt Free Library moved out of its Lafayette Square branch in West Baltimore, Twilah Scarborough moved in to keep books on the shelves and the doors open."They left us 125 cases of books as a peace offering," said Ms. Scarborough, a neighborhood resident who runs the one-room library five days a week.
NEWS
June 21, 2001
THIS IS a cry for help: West Baltimore's Lafayette Square - once one of the city's most glorious spots - is threatened. The number of vacant buildings is growing. Among them is a mansion a builder renovated for his family. It is now abandoned and open to the elements. This deterioration must be stopped. This downward spiral is heartbreaking. It cancels out recent investments by St. James Episcopal Church in the neighborhood. That congregation is just one of several prominent churches ringing the square, whose notable recent residents have included former Rep. Parren J. Mitchell.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1999
A deteriorating building, thousands of dollars in delinquent bills and a cut in funding from city and United Way officials is forcing the Lafayette Square Community Center to close its doors Thursday.The center has been an institution in West Baltimore's Sandtown-Winchester community, one of the city's most economically depressed areas. It opened nearly 50 years ago in a dilapidated building at the corner of Lanvale Street and Fremont Avenue.Later, Vernon Roy Sheffey, the center's director from 1965 to 1989, ran a fund-raising campaign that led to a new, $1.5 million, 30,000-square-foot facility which opened at the corner of Lafayette Avenue and Gilmor Street in 1974.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2004
THE ENOCH Pratt's Central Library is presenting a six-week retrospective on West Baltimore's Lafayette Square in its main hall. The Maryland Historical Trust is recommending that a large swath of the west side that surrounds the square be put on the National Register of Historic Places. Environmental researchers are mapping the area as part of a project on urban watersheds. Arlene Fisher, a longtime resident and community activist who lives a half-block from the square, is not averse to the attention but says that more than notice is required to restore the area with a rich past and needy present.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2013
Walter Scott Brown, a retired Baltimore & Ohio Railroad civil engineer whose career overseeing the railroad's infrastructure spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville of complications from a fall he suffered last month. Mr. Brown, who family members said "remained sharp until the end of his life," was 106. The son of a building contractor and a homemaker, Walter Scott Brown was born at home in Lafayette Square, where he was raised.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Local archaeologists have not only confirmed that Baltimore's Lafayette Square Park was once the stomping ground of a Civil War army barracks, but they also dug up a little-known fact about the soldiers who dwelled there: They had a knack for losing buttons. On Sunday, volunteers who joined the Baltimore Heritage and Archaeological Society of Maryland in searching for remnants at the former Union army encampment ended a three-day quest of exploring the park's history in the 19th century.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | July 8, 2011
Volunteer archaeologists are descending on leafy Lafayette Square in West Baltimore this weekend in an effort to uncover relics from Camp Hoffman, a Union army encampment that stood there during the Civil War. Just hours into the project Friday, while dodging rain showers and swarms of June bugs, the diggers had already turned up fragments of mid-19th-century tableware and decorative wrought iron, nails, birdshot and even a piece of an old pocket watch....
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Madeline Leonia "Mae" Pullen, a longtime Harlem Park-Lafayette Square activist who fought for senior housing options and public safety, health and education issues for residents, died Oct. 7 in her sleep at Caton Manor Nursing Home. She was 90. The daughter of a carpenter and a homemaker, Madeline Leonia Brown was born in Sparrows Point and raised on Carey Street. She graduated from Frederick Douglass High School in 1938, and the next year married her high school sweetheart, Francis Pullen Sr., who later became a U.S. Post Office supervisor.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 17, 2010
While leaving a press event at the old Hebrew Orphan Asylum last week, I considered some of the other abandoned buildings I was passing in West Baltimore. Somehow the old orphanage never collapsed or caught fire. It was fortunate. It's also not alone in its abandonment. Later that dry and windy day, some big circa-1870s Baltimore houses caught fire. Houses on North Calhoun Street and others close by on North Carey Street were filled with flames that firefighters had a time controlling.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
Barbara Ann Tarver, who worked in Baltimore schools as a teacher and assistant principal for more than three decades, died Aug. 22 from injuries sustained in a two-car crash early that morning on Interstate 70. She was 61. Ms. Tarver was born, raised and educated in Baltimore. She graduated from Western High School in 1966 and earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from what is now Coppin State University, where she joined the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. in 1970. A few years later, she received a master's degree from the same school, remembers friend Ann Ezell.
NEWS
July 31, 2002
Walter Thomas, 92, bar owner, activist Walter Thomas, a retired bar owner and community activist, died of cancer Sunday at St. Agnes HealthCare. He was 92 and lived in the Lafayette Square section of West Baltimore. Born in Lynchburg, S.C., where he attended public schools, Mr. Thomas moved to Baltimore as a young man and worked as a waiter at the old Emerson Hotel at Calvert and Baltimore streets. Family members said he was known in the neighborhood as "Bow Tie" Thomas because of his favorite ties.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 31, 2004
The nonprofit corporation overseeing Baltimore's multimillion-dollar federally funded empowerment zone revitalization effort has suspended funding to one of its five community-based village centers and says there is "the possibility of fraud" in the center's alleged misspending of $70,000. Empower Baltimore Management Corp. suspended all funding in late June to the Harlem Park/Lafayette Square Village Center after an internal review found missing documents in the administration of a program to help find jobs for unemployed residents and an allegedly improper payment of $7,000 to the group's chair, officials said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 5, 2009
The home once owned by pioneering Rep. Parren J. Mitchell goes to auction this week amid hopes the mansion's Victorian charm can somehow outweigh a neighborhood coping with vacant houses and a litany of urban ills. With its soaring gilt mirrors and filigreed plaster ceiling medallions, the house at 828 N. Carrollton Ave. is one of the grandest addresses overlooking Lafayette Square. "I bought the house with my heart," confessed Lily T. Tsui, a Potomac resident who purchased the house "on impulse" but never lived in it. "I just looked at it and fell in love with it. When you go inside, it takes your breath away.
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