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By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun Staff writer Mark Matthews also contributed to this article | October 31, 1994
Washington -- -- Lafayette Park is a green oasis across the street from the White House where people often claim to be God or the president.Its exotic denizens -- many of whom actually live in the park -- have proven a constant annoyance to the real presidents. Chanting demonstrators camped there helped drive Lyndon Johnson from office. George Bush complained he couldn't sleep because of the pounding of protest drums during the Persian Gulf War.The government has repeatedly gone to court trying to eject protesters and eccentrics from the park.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Antiwar leader Philip Berrigan died of cancer last month, but his presence was keenly felt yesterday on a second day of weekend protests against possible war with Iraq. His picture was affixed to the parkas of several dozen Baltimore marchers. His widow, Elizabeth McAlister, addressed the several hundred demonstrators. And his 21-year-old daughter, Kate, was arrested after jumping a barrier in an act of civil disobedience that has become something of a family tradition. "It would give him a lot of hope to see people come out in weather [that is]
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- During the 1992 presidential campaign the Clinton-Gore headquarters in California made a practice of faxing daily ''talking points'' to party leaders and officials around the state so they could reinforce the arguments the national candidates were making that day.One official, then-Rep. Leon Panetta, refused to allow the talking points to be faxed to his office. Because the fax machine and paper were government property, the future White House chief of staff ruled, they couldn't be used for political purposes.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Two rallies, just hours apart. Two starkly different messages for President Clinton and the NATO alliance, delivered from the same sun-splashed promenade in front of the White House.More than 1,000 Albanian-Americans -- their bodies draped in American flags as they chanted "U-S-A! U-S-A!," making the scene feel like an Olympic hockey game -- poured into Lafayette Park to celebrate the NATO bombing campaign against Serbia.That event was at noontime.At 5 p.m., it was the Serbs' turn.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Antiwar leader Philip Berrigan died of cancer last month, but his presence was keenly felt yesterday on a second day of weekend protests against possible war with Iraq. His picture was affixed to the parkas of several dozen Baltimore marchers. His widow, Elizabeth McAlister, addressed the several hundred demonstrators. And his 21-year-old daughter, Kate, was arrested after jumping a barrier in an act of civil disobedience that has become something of a family tradition. "It would give him a lot of hope to see people come out in weather [that is]
FEATURES
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
Washington -- Mail call in Lafayette Park.William Thomas, who has lived in the park since 1981 -- the better to be close to the White House, the better to exercise his right of free expression in what serves as the nation's front yard -- has returned from the post office to his home, on the sidewalk.He has company.There is his wife, Ellen, fellow park resident. There usually are tourists. There always are the homeless waiting out the day on the benches. Morning is the time for presidential aides; on their way to work they hurry past Andrew Jackson, the president tipping his hat from a rearing bronze horse.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | March 31, 1995
Thousands of nurses from around the nation were expected in Washington today for a march to protest cost-cutting measures they say are making hospitals dangerous places for sick people.A survey released last month by the American Nurses Association, one of several sponsors of today's march, found 44 percent of hospitals are using "minimally skilled workers" to replace some of their licensed nurses.Of 1,835 registered nurses surveyed, 68.4 percent said professional nursing at their hospitals had been reduced in the previous 12 months, and 17.5 percent reported an increase in errors affecting patient safety.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Dismayed peace activists kept a tense vigil outside the White House yesterday, calling on President Bush to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq.From Boston to San Francisco, demonstrators chained themselves to buildings, blocked bridges and burned flags. Hundreds were arrested, some in confrontations with supporters of the war.At a news conference in Lafayette Park across from the White House last night, anti-war leaders urged Americans "to take to the streets.""Meaningful social change in this country has always required protest in the streets," said Jim Driscoll, a Vietnam War veteran.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 1997
WASHINGTON - Teamwork allows three of the District of Columbia's most durable peace activists to protest within yards of the White House in a 24-hour, in-your-face-mister-president vigil.Concepcion Picciotto, 55, and William and Ellen Thomas, both 50, have lived on the sidewalk across the street from the White House for more than a dozen years.In a tag-team vigil, two of them hold anti-war signs, pass out literature and circulate a petition while the third takes breaks to use a toilet, take a shower, find a sandwich or sleep.
FEATURES
By Janet Braunstein and Janet Braunstein,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 13, 1993
The Christmas after Chuck Meeker bought his first home was a lean one. That night of Dec. 12, when he closed on the condominium in Michigan and moved in, he was flat broke but happy.Mr. Meeker had used up every cent of his savings to pay the 10 percent down payment on his $42,000, one-bedroom condo in Lafayette Park.Credit was tight in 1980, and as a single, 30-year-old, first-time buyer, he'd also been required to pay off all his debts -- even his $200 MasterCard bill -- to qualify for a mortgage.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 1997
WASHINGTON - Teamwork allows three of the District of Columbia's most durable peace activists to protest within yards of the White House in a 24-hour, in-your-face-mister-president vigil.Concepcion Picciotto, 55, and William and Ellen Thomas, both 50, have lived on the sidewalk across the street from the White House for more than a dozen years.In a tag-team vigil, two of them hold anti-war signs, pass out literature and circulate a petition while the third takes breaks to use a toilet, take a shower, find a sandwich or sleep.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- During the 1992 presidential campaign the Clinton-Gore headquarters in California made a practice of faxing daily ''talking points'' to party leaders and officials around the state so they could reinforce the arguments the national candidates were making that day.One official, then-Rep. Leon Panetta, refused to allow the talking points to be faxed to his office. Because the fax machine and paper were government property, the future White House chief of staff ruled, they couldn't be used for political purposes.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | March 31, 1995
Thousands of nurses from around the nation were expected in Washington today for a march to protest cost-cutting measures they say are making hospitals dangerous places for sick people.A survey released last month by the American Nurses Association, one of several sponsors of today's march, found 44 percent of hospitals are using "minimally skilled workers" to replace some of their licensed nurses.Of 1,835 registered nurses surveyed, 68.4 percent said professional nursing at their hospitals had been reduced in the previous 12 months, and 17.5 percent reported an increase in errors affecting patient safety.
FEATURES
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun Staff writer Mark Matthews also contributed to this article | October 31, 1994
Washington -- -- Lafayette Park is a green oasis across the street from the White House where people often claim to be God or the president.Its exotic denizens -- many of whom actually live in the park -- have proven a constant annoyance to the real presidents. Chanting demonstrators camped there helped drive Lyndon Johnson from office. George Bush complained he couldn't sleep because of the pounding of protest drums during the Persian Gulf War.The government has repeatedly gone to court trying to eject protesters and eccentrics from the park.
FEATURES
By Janet Braunstein and Janet Braunstein,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 13, 1993
The Christmas after Chuck Meeker bought his first home was a lean one. That night of Dec. 12, when he closed on the condominium in Michigan and moved in, he was flat broke but happy.Mr. Meeker had used up every cent of his savings to pay the 10 percent down payment on his $42,000, one-bedroom condo in Lafayette Park.Credit was tight in 1980, and as a single, 30-year-old, first-time buyer, he'd also been required to pay off all his debts -- even his $200 MasterCard bill -- to qualify for a mortgage.
FEATURES
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
Washington -- Mail call in Lafayette Park.William Thomas, who has lived in the park since 1981 -- the better to be close to the White House, the better to exercise his right of free expression in what serves as the nation's front yard -- has returned from the post office to his home, on the sidewalk.He has company.There is his wife, Ellen, fellow park resident. There usually are tourists. There always are the homeless waiting out the day on the benches. Morning is the time for presidential aides; on their way to work they hurry past Andrew Jackson, the president tipping his hat from a rearing bronze horse.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 1, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Two rallies, just hours apart. Two starkly different messages for President Clinton and the NATO alliance, delivered from the same sun-splashed promenade in front of the White House.More than 1,000 Albanian-Americans -- their bodies draped in American flags as they chanted "U-S-A! U-S-A!," making the scene feel like an Olympic hockey game -- poured into Lafayette Park to celebrate the NATO bombing campaign against Serbia.That event was at noontime.At 5 p.m., it was the Serbs' turn.
TRAVEL
By [MATTHEW VENSEL] | August 19, 2007
Get a taste of action, drama and history in Washington on Saturday as you learn about one of the most infamous acts in U.S. history: the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. The Lincoln Assassination Tour walks you through streets and buildings, including the theater where the assassination took place, and dives into the intriguing conspiracy behind the fatal and consequential events of that night. The tour starts at 7 p.m. Saturdays through Oct. 27 at the Andrew Jackson statue in Lafayette Square Park, Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest, Washington.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Dismayed peace activists kept a tense vigil outside the White House yesterday, calling on President Bush to withdraw U.S. troops from Iraq.From Boston to San Francisco, demonstrators chained themselves to buildings, blocked bridges and burned flags. Hundreds were arrested, some in confrontations with supporters of the war.At a news conference in Lafayette Park across from the White House last night, anti-war leaders urged Americans "to take to the streets.""Meaningful social change in this country has always required protest in the streets," said Jim Driscoll, a Vietnam War veteran.
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