Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLafarge
IN THE NEWS

Lafarge

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1999
"The Artist of the Missing," by Paul LaFarge. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 241 pages. $13.Some novels are absolutely engrossing even if one is never quite sure what they are about. Sentences, pages and finally whole chapters go by in patient anticipation that the mystery will dissolve and everything will become clear.Most authors sooner or later oblige readers' desire for resolution. Paul LaFarge, whose "Artist of the Missing" tantalizes without ever quite allowing itself to be pinned down, is an exception.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 17, 2008
An 1883 altarpiece glows after a painstaking restoration at a downtown Episcopal church. The mother of pearl, the gold-leafed opalescent glass, the colors of an Impressionist painting were there all the time, hidden under four layers of retouching and crude repainting. The sculptural panel depicting the Virgin Mary and St. John is the centerpiece of a six-month refurbishment at Mount Calvary Church, Eutaw Street at Madison Avenue. "Before I started, the figure of St. John resembled actor Tony Curtis.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1998
The county commissioners signed an agreement yesterday that requires the owner of a Wakefield Valley quarry to study ways to protect underground water supplies before going ahead with a major expansion.The agreement requires Lafarge Corp., owner of Medford quarry operator Redland Genstar, to finance a study of a technique that could reduce the volume of water pumped out of the pits. Hydrogeologists say the technique will help preserve water supplies north of the quarry and may reduce the incidence of sinkholes in the area.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | July 26, 2008
An Anne Arundel County jury has awarded $1.95 million to a man struck and injured by a cement-mixer truck in April 2005 while working on his disabled vehicle on the shoulder of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. The $1.83 million portion of the judgment awarded for pain and suffering will be capped at $650,000, the legal limit in Maryland at the time of the accident. The accident left Robert L. Howard, the driver of a truck for Goodwill Industries, with a severe injury to his arm and killed his assistant, Errol Johnson, 44. The pair were standing by their disabled vehicle on the northbound side of the parkway near the Baltimore Beltway when they were hit by a cement mixer driven by Richard Anthony Schulman for Lafarge Mid-Atlantic.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
Redland PLC, the parent company of Hunt Valley-based Redland Genstar Inc., is fighting a hostile takeover bid by LaFarge SA of France, Redland Genstar said yesterday.Redland Genstar, which operates stone quarries, employs about 130 people at its Towson headquarters and more than 700 elsewhere throughout the state.Jack Gease, director of real estate for Redland Genstar, said Redland PLC is preparing a proposal that would break the company into four divisions to be sold separately."Redland must show that [its plan]
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
A deal that would have a Laurel-based quarry company buy the asphalt-making and road-construction business of Reston, Va.-based Lafarge Corp. is taking longer to complete than insiders in the local road-construction business had expected.Industry sources say Laurel Sand & Gravel has outbid a consortium of local contractors to buy the assets, which Lafarge acquired last year when it bought Towson-based Redland Genstar Inc. as part of a $690 million deal. Lafarge put the asphalt plants and road-paving business up for sale last fall because they did not fit with Lafarge's core mining business -- and because they put the company into direct competition with customers who bought its sand and crushed stone, ingredients of concrete or blacktop for roads.
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2007
Their worlds are about to be rocked. During the first week at St. Joseph School in Cockeysville, Debbie Kleim prepares her afternoon kindergarten class for the inevitable. It's noon, or close enough. They all wait. Then the earth rumbles and, just as quickly, the vibration ends. Was it an earthquake? Did something blow up under the school? As Kleim tells her 5-year-olds each year: "It's nothing to be afraid of. It's a rock quarry." The children in this enclave of Cockeysville now know what others before them have known since, well, the Civil War. Quarry blasts are a dusty fact of life.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
The leader of a New Windsor community group is skeptical an agreement between the county and a Wakefield Valley quarry operator will protect underground water supplies in the limestone-rich valley.The agreement, signed last week, gives county approval for Virginia-based Lafarge Corp. to connect two pits at the Medford quarry. The single huge pit will descend 500 feet below ground level. Lafarge acquired the Medford quarry when it bought Redland Genstar, the former quarry owner, in June.The quarry operator pledged to study a technique called grouting to reduce underground water flowing into the pit and possibly curb the incidence of sinkholes that pock the valley's surface.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
The leader of a New Windsor community group is skeptical an agreement between the county and a Wakefield Valley quarry operator will protect underground water supplies in the limestone-rich valley.The agreement, signed last week, gives county approval for Virginia-based Lafarge Corp. to connect two pits at the Medford quarry. The single huge pit will descend 500 feet below ground level. Lafarge acquired the Medford quarry when it bought Redland Genstar, the former quarry owner, in June.The quarry operator pledged to study a technique called grouting to reduce underground water flowing into the pit and possibly curb the incidence of sinkholes that pock the valley's surface.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2005
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Tuesday August Institute for Supply Management services Index Earnings: AXA; Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc.; McData Corp.; WorldSpace Inc. Wednesday Second quarter productivity Earnings reports: Albertson's Inc.; Comverse Technology Inc.; Navistar International Corp.; Take Two Interactive Software Inc. Thursday July wholesale inventories July consumer credit Earnings: Barr Pharmaceuticals Inc.; Lafarge; Molex Inc.; National Semiconductor Corp.
NEWS
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2007
Their worlds are about to be rocked. During the first week at St. Joseph School in Cockeysville, Debbie Kleim prepares her afternoon kindergarten class for the inevitable. It's noon, or close enough. They all wait. Then the earth rumbles and, just as quickly, the vibration ends. Was it an earthquake? Did something blow up under the school? As Kleim tells her 5-year-olds each year: "It's nothing to be afraid of. It's a rock quarry." The children in this enclave of Cockeysville now know what others before them have known since, well, the Civil War. Quarry blasts are a dusty fact of life.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2005
A weekly briefing on the economic calendar Tuesday August Institute for Supply Management services Index Earnings: AXA; Jos. A. Bank Clothiers Inc.; McData Corp.; WorldSpace Inc. Wednesday Second quarter productivity Earnings reports: Albertson's Inc.; Comverse Technology Inc.; Navistar International Corp.; Take Two Interactive Software Inc. Thursday July wholesale inventories July consumer credit Earnings: Barr Pharmaceuticals Inc.; Lafarge; Molex Inc.; National Semiconductor Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1999
"The Artist of the Missing," by Paul LaFarge. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 241 pages. $13.Some novels are absolutely engrossing even if one is never quite sure what they are about. Sentences, pages and finally whole chapters go by in patient anticipation that the mystery will dissolve and everything will become clear.Most authors sooner or later oblige readers' desire for resolution. Paul LaFarge, whose "Artist of the Missing" tantalizes without ever quite allowing itself to be pinned down, is an exception.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1999
A deal that would have a Laurel-based quarry company buy the asphalt-making and road-construction business of Reston, Va.-based Lafarge Corp. is taking longer to complete than insiders in the local road-construction business had expected.Industry sources say Laurel Sand & Gravel has outbid a consortium of local contractors to buy the assets, which Lafarge acquired last year when it bought Towson-based Redland Genstar Inc. as part of a $690 million deal. Lafarge put the asphalt plants and road-paving business up for sale last fall because they did not fit with Lafarge's core mining business -- and because they put the company into direct competition with customers who bought its sand and crushed stone, ingredients of concrete or blacktop for roads.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
The leader of a New Windsor community group is skeptical an agreement between the county and a Wakefield Valley quarry operator will protect underground water supplies in the limestone-rich valley.The agreement, signed last week, gives county approval for Virginia-based Lafarge Corp. to connect two pits at the Medford quarry. The single huge pit will descend 500 feet below ground level. Lafarge acquired the Medford quarry when it bought Redland Genstar, the former quarry owner, in June.The quarry operator pledged to study a technique called grouting to reduce underground water flowing into the pit and possibly curb the incidence of sinkholes that pock the valley's surface.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
The leader of a New Windsor community group is skeptical an agreement between the county and a Wakefield Valley quarry operator will protect underground water supplies in the limestone-rich valley.The agreement, signed last week, gives county approval for Virginia-based Lafarge Corp. to connect two pits at the Medford quarry. The single huge pit will descend 500 feet below ground level. Lafarge acquired the Medford quarry when it bought Redland Genstar, the former quarry owner, in June.The quarry operator pledged to study a technique called grouting to reduce underground water flowing into the pit and possibly curb the incidence of sinkholes that pock the valley's surface.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1998
The County Commissioners may sign a contract today that will clear the way for a Wakefield Valley limestone quarry operator to begin joining two existing quarries into a single huge pit that will be 500 feet deep.The commissioners are scheduled to meet with representatives of Lafarge Corp., owner of Redland Genstar Inc., which has sought since 1993 to expand its 42-year-old Medford quarry. The expansion plan won approval from the county Planning and Zoning Commission in 1995, but county government and corporate negotiators have spent three years working out the proposed contract scheduled for discussion today.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1998
The county commissioners signed an agreement yesterday that requires the owner of a Wakefield Valley quarry to study ways to protect underground water supplies before going ahead with a major expansion.The agreement requires Lafarge Corp., owner of Medford quarry operator Redland Genstar, to finance a study of a technique that could reduce the volume of water pumped out of the pits. Hydrogeologists say the technique will help preserve water supplies north of the quarry and may reduce the incidence of sinkholes in the area.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.