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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2009
The Naval Academy's Mahan Hall rocked with laughter last weekend as the midshipmen of the Masqueraders displayed their comedic mastery in Lee Blessing's "Fortinbras." This 1991 political satire, which ran for two weekends, picks up where Shakespeare's "Hamlet" leaves off. The play opens with the mortally wounded Hamlet willing his kingdom to the prince Fortinbras and commanding his friend Horatio to relate his story to the world. Soon after Hamlet dies, Fortinbras arrives to find several expired royals lying about in need of disposal.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2009
The Naval Academy's Mahan Hall rocked with laughter last weekend as the midshipmen of the Masqueraders displayed their comedic mastery in Lee Blessing's "Fortinbras." This 1991 political satire, which ran for two weekends, picks up where Shakespeare's "Hamlet" leaves off. The play opens with the mortally wounded Hamlet willing his kingdom to the prince Fortinbras and commanding his friend Horatio to relate his story to the world. Soon after Hamlet dies, Fortinbras arrives to find several expired royals lying about in need of disposal.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | July 21, 1995
It requires nearly as much guts as talent to take a solid whack at "Hamlet," and the folks at the Annapolis Company Theater in residence at St. John's College have pretty fair amounts of both.Director Nathan Rosen has rejected the prevailing Freudian view that has Shakespeare's melancholy prince mulling over suicide, regicide and matricide as a result of an Oedipal crisis provoked by his mother's hasty marriage to Hamlet's uncle just after the death of his father.Instead of a melancholy, moping Hamlet, Mr. Rosen and actor Aaron Finkelstein have given us a Hamlet full of the anger of a young theology student driven by an all-consuming desire to see earthly justice done in the here-and-now.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Hamlet: Was't Hamlet wrong'd Laertes? Never Hamlet: If Hamlet from himself be ta'en away, And when he's not himself does wrong Laertes, Then Hamlet does it not, Hamlet denies it. Who does it, then? His madness ...- Hamlet, Act V, Scene II Lee Boyd Malvo hopes to go where Patty Hearst, David Berkowitz, Jack Ruby and Andrea Yates could not. Each of those other high-profile defendants pleaded insanity as a defense against grave criminal charges. Each of them failed. Instead of the hospital ward they sought, every one of them ended up in a prison cell.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Hamlet: Was't Hamlet wrong'd Laertes? Never Hamlet: If Hamlet from himself be ta'en away, And when he's not himself does wrong Laertes, Then Hamlet does it not, Hamlet denies it. Who does it, then? His madness ...- Hamlet, Act V, Scene II Lee Boyd Malvo hopes to go where Patty Hearst, David Berkowitz, Jack Ruby and Andrea Yates could not. Each of those other high-profile defendants pleaded insanity as a defense against grave criminal charges. Each of them failed. Instead of the hospital ward they sought, every one of them ended up in a prison cell.
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2006
Mist covers the stage, and a solitary seated figure declaims his misery. Thus begins a powerful production of Shakespeare's Hamlet, directed by Kasi Campbell for Rep Stage. Hamlet's speech, in Act II, is in grim harmony with the rough, dark walls of the set. An open grave yawns in the center of a bare playing area, a symbol of the death that has caused Hamlet's grief and an omen of the many deaths to come. Hamlet is in mourning for his late father, the king of Denmark. He is scandalized by the fact that less than two months after the burial, his mother, Queen Gertrude, has married the king's brother, Claudius, who is now on the throne.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 6, 2000
Most adults who have gone to school in an English-speaking country have read Shakespeare's "Hamlet." Many remember entire speeches -- "to be or not to be" -- and the play's capacity to raise profound but almost everyday questions of judgment, courage, integrity and ethics. It's a nasty tale: Prince Hamlet is visited by his father's ghost -- which embodies history as fact and morality as a nag. The ghost relates that he was murdered by his brother, Claudius, now his successor both as king of Denmark and as husband to Gertrude, young Hamlet's mother.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 24, 1997
Alas, poor Hamlet. I knew him, Horatio. He was an amusing, if melancholy, fellow until Kenneth Branagh turned him into Stanley Kowalski.Branagh's new unexpurgated "Hamlet," all 4 1/2 hours of it (including intermission), co-starring a palace (Blenhiem) to say nothing of Charlton Heston and Billy Crystal, is vast, opulent, wide and dispiriting. It should have been called "Kenneth," instead of "Hamlet" for it's more about its star and director than Shakespeare's flawed noble. At the end, you're thinking "Good riddance, sour prince."
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1997
The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra ended its season Wednesday with a theatrical flourish, playing to a full house at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. The program featured two actors and musical works with a dramatic connection.Of course, that means Shakespeare, who has inspired more music than any other playwright. As an opener, the actors -- Wendy Salkind and Michael A. Stebbins of the Maryland Stage Company -- performed three of the sonnets: No. 18, the very familiar "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?"
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | June 30, 2000
"Hamlet" Sun score: ** 1/2 The King and CEO of Denmark Corporation is dead. These are the opening words of Michael Almereyda's "Hamlet," and they pretty much clue in the audience as to how the director has reconceived Shakespeare's play, which lends itself well to the contemporary context of corporate ambition, Gen-X angst and post-Freudian psychodrama. In this clever take on that most quoted of classics, the original manages to take on new shadings despite a few performance and casting gaffes.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | July 21, 1995
It requires nearly as much guts as talent to take a solid whack at "Hamlet," and the folks at the Annapolis Company Theater in residence at St. John's College have pretty fair amounts of both.Director Nathan Rosen has rejected the prevailing Freudian view that has Shakespeare's melancholy prince mulling over suicide, regicide and matricide as a result of an Oedipal crisis provoked by his mother's hasty marriage to Hamlet's uncle just after the death of his father.Instead of a melancholy, moping Hamlet, Mr. Rosen and actor Aaron Finkelstein have given us a Hamlet full of the anger of a young theology student driven by an all-consuming desire to see earthly justice done in the here-and-now.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
Shakespeare On Wheels' 10th-anniversary production of "Hamlet" will tour Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Washington, July 2 through Oct. 9.In the spirit of the medieval pageant wagon, the theater, based at and sponsored by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, travels across the region giving free performances of a Shakespeare play in outdoor settings.This year, in an effort to stabilize funding, the summer theater has created an Adopt-A-Character program.For a tax-deductible contribution, Shakespeare fans can receive a series of letters written from the point of view of Hamlet, Claudius, Gertrude, Ophelia, Polonius, Laertes, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern -- and even the ghost of Hamlet's father.
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