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By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Leading up to the Women's Final Four, North Carolina State coach Kay Yow was the toast of the tournament, reaching the main event for the first time in 23 years at the school.Come game time, however, her team was just plain toast, absorbing an 84-65 defeat at the hands of Louisiana Tech last night at Kemper Arena.Led by four players in double figures, the Lady Techsters (31-3), were too quick, too fast, and too aggressive for the Wolfpack (25-7). They advance to tomorrow's championship game against Tennessee, which routed ninth-seeded Arkansas, 86-58, in last night's other semifinal.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2000
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- If ever a team were unfamiliar with the concept of underdog, you'd have to figure it would be the Tennessee women's basketball team. The Lady Vols are the standard-bearers of their sport of the college game, with six national championship banners hanging from the rafters of Thompson-Boling Arena. But, heading into today's nationally televised showdown with No. 1 Connecticut here (Channel 13, 4 p.m.), the second-ranked Lady Vols are playing Avis to the Huskies' Hertz, and they don't seem to mind.
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- The top-ranked Purdue women's basketball team doesn't appear to believe in doing anything easy. Its foul shots roll tenuously around the rim before settling in, it keeps teams in the contest for longer than it should and it milks every second out of every possession. But the Boilermakers also win, and their grind-it-out, down-to-the-wire style was good enough to defeat No. 3 Louisiana Tech, 77-63, in last night's national semifinal. Purdue (33-1), now riding a 31-game winning streak, will play Duke tomorrow for the school's first national championship, thanks to the grit and guile of its senior backcourt of Ukari Figgs and Stephanie White-McCarty.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1999
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- The top-ranked Purdue women's basketball team doesn't appear to believe in doing anything easy. Its foul shots roll tenuously around the rim before settling in, it keeps teams in the contest for longer than it should and it milks every second out of every possession. But the Boilermakers also win, and their grind-it-out, down-to-the-wire style was good enough to defeat No. 3 Louisiana Tech, 77-63, in last night's national semifinal. Purdue (33-1), now riding a 31-game winning streak, will play Duke tomorrow for the school's first national championship, thanks to the grit and guile of its senior backcourt of Ukari Figgs and Stephanie White-McCarty.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2000
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. -- If ever a team were unfamiliar with the concept of underdog, you'd have to figure it would be the Tennessee women's basketball team. The Lady Vols are the standard-bearers of their sport of the college game, with six national championship banners hanging from the rafters of Thompson-Boling Arena. But, heading into today's nationally televised showdown with No. 1 Connecticut here (Channel 13, 4 p.m.), the second-ranked Lady Vols are playing Avis to the Huskies' Hertz, and they don't seem to mind.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-- So, what do they do for an encore?The Tennessee women's basketball team completed arguably the greatest season in the history of the sport with a convincing 93-75 win over Louisiana Tech last night that not only netted the Lady Vols an unprecedented third straight title, but capped an unbeaten season.Despite something of a second-half lull, in which the Lady Techsters pared a 23-point deficit down to 15, Tennessee (39-0) was never serious challenged in its quest for perfection.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
There are those who believe that there really isn't much in the way of drama or surprise in the NCAA women's tournament each year, as the same heavy-hitters get the same high seeds and trample their way through the brackets toward the Final Four.And, with top-ranked and unbeaten Tennessee entering this year's tournament as a heavy favorite to capture its third straight title, the suspense may already be gone from this year's march to Kansas City, Mo., the site of the national semifinals.But the nine-member tournament selection committee has taken care of the surprise element, with some rather intriguing seeding decisions.
SPORTS
November 17, 2000
Taking the next step: Mississippi State and Oklahoma made impressive debuts on the national stage last season. Can they continue to move forward? Fountains of youth: Nearly all the top title contenders (Connecticut, Tennessee, Duke, Purdue) will have freshmen in key roles. How quickly will they mature? Hoops al fresco: Arizona State and Tennessee will meet Dec. 27 at Bank One Ballpark in Phoenix with the roof open and a possible crowd of 30,000. Welcome back, Leon: Louisiana Tech coach Leon Barmore was coaxed out of retirement when longtime assistant Kim Mulkey-Robertson went to Baylor.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Christian Ewell and Milton Kent and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Louisiana Tech coach Leon Barmore has two NCAA championship trophies -- as many as any women's coach not named Pat Summitt, but he's haunted by the one that got away.That would be the 1994 title, won by North Carolina on a buzzer-beating three-pointer by Charlotte Smith -- perhaps the most dramatic shot in women's tournament history."Listen, I thought this would come up earlier than it did," said Barmore, after last night's 84-65 win over North Carolina State to earn the Lady Techsters a berth in tomorrow night's national championship game.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Dominating the women's Final Four, there's the Tennessee story, and then there's the coaching story.The Tennessee story is easy enough. With two wins, the Volunteers will earn an unprecedented third consecutive NCAA title and only the third undefeated season since the NCAA started holding the tournament in 1982.On the other hand, "It's time you see some new faces here," Arkansas coach Gary Blair said, referring to himself and N.C. State coach Kay Yow, both making their first appearance in the Final Four.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-- So, what do they do for an encore?The Tennessee women's basketball team completed arguably the greatest season in the history of the sport with a convincing 93-75 win over Louisiana Tech last night that not only netted the Lady Vols an unprecedented third straight title, but capped an unbeaten season.Despite something of a second-half lull, in which the Lady Techsters pared a 23-point deficit down to 15, Tennessee (39-0) was never serious challenged in its quest for perfection.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Leading up to the Women's Final Four, North Carolina State coach Kay Yow was the toast of the tournament, reaching the main event for the first time in 23 years at the school.Come game time, however, her team was just plain toast, absorbing an 84-65 defeat at the hands of Louisiana Tech last night at Kemper Arena.Led by four players in double figures, the Lady Techsters (31-3), were too quick, too fast, and too aggressive for the Wolfpack (25-7). They advance to tomorrow's championship game against Tennessee, which routed ninth-seeded Arkansas, 86-58, in last night's other semifinal.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1998
There are those who believe that there really isn't much in the way of drama or surprise in the NCAA women's tournament each year, as the same heavy-hitters get the same high seeds and trample their way through the brackets toward the Final Four.And, with top-ranked and unbeaten Tennessee entering this year's tournament as a heavy favorite to capture its third straight title, the suspense may already be gone from this year's march to Kansas City, Mo., the site of the national semifinals.But the nine-member tournament selection committee has taken care of the surprise element, with some rather intriguing seeding decisions.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
Tori Harrison, perhaps the best women's basketball player Baltimore has produced, has resigned as coach of the Coppin State women's team after compiling a 61-77 record over five seasons.Harrison won Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Coach of the Year honors in 1992-93, her first season on the North Avenue campus when she led the Lady Eagles to a 20-9 record and a regular-season title. That, however, marked her last winning season. This past year, her team finished 7-20.A star at Towson Catholic, Harrison was named a Parade magazine high school All-American in 1983.
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