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Lady Macbeth

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By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 16, 2003
Three murders, a couple of floggings and sexual assaults, a suicide and the most X-rated music -- yes, music -- in all of opera. Even some late-night cable TV shows pale next to Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, the brilliant creation by Dmitri Shostakovich that incensed Josef Stalin and caused the composer to be labeled an "enemy of the people." The work, which will be performed for the first time by the Baltimore Opera Company as part of the Vivat! St. Petersburg festival, can still raise eyebrows and earlobes, but few operagoers these days end up siding with Stalin.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The conniving politician at the center of the Netflix drama "House of Cards" is named Frank, but he's anything but honest, forthright and direct. His wife was christened Claire - an ironic choice for a woman who always has an ulterior motive. Even the couple's surname, "Underwood," hints at their hypocrisy by echoing "underhanded. " It's costume designer Johanna Argan's job to subliminally convey that duplicity to the audience through the clothes the characters wear. "The other characters think they're getting one thing from Frank and Claire," Argan said in a phone interview.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 24, 2003
The truth, Oscar Wilde said, is rarely pure and never simple. The same can be said of Katerina Ismailova, the complex character who drives Dmitri Shostakovich's operatic masterwork, Lady Macbeth of Mtsesnk. In freeing herself from a mundane existence as a rich merchant's wife, she discovers new passions inside her, leading to catastrophe for herself and others. There's no mistaking the bad things that result -- three murders, for a start -- but it's impossible to think of Katerina as a clear-cut case of evil, which is one reason why she will never lose her fascination.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013
How's this for a challenging role? A young girl travels through time with her younger sister. Oh, and she's determined to kill God. Still, Lauren Saunders was down for playing Lucy in Single Carrot Theatre 's "A Beginner's Guide to Deicide. " "I was attracted to this play because it challenges a lot of constructs - religion, gender, power and more," said Saunders, 25, who's a fellow with Single Carrot and also works for the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance. "It afforded me the opportunity to explore things as an actor that I had yet to explore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 19, 2000
A slight, impish Lady Macbeth? Not so outlandish with Pippa Pearthree in the role. Nearly 20 years ago, when Pippa Pearthree was playing Ophelia in Joseph Papp's production of "Hamlet" at the New York Shakespeare Festival, the late great impresario told her: "The part for you is going to be Lady Macbeth." Now Center Stage is giving her a chance to see if Papp was right. Beginning Friday, Pearthree will be the one urging Macbeth (played by Ritchie Coster) to "screw your courage to the sticking place."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 3, 2002
An earthy, brutal opera that offended Stalin, and an Oriental-flavored gem from the French repertoire are among the works planned for the Baltimore Opera Company's 2002-2003 season. These two jolts of novelty - Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk by Dmitri Shostakovich and Lakme by Leo Delibes - will be balanced by such perennial favorites as Giuseppe Verdi's Rigoletto, Johann Strauss' Die Fledermaus and Giacomo Puccini's Madama Butterfly. The Shostakovich production is Baltimore Opera's contribution to "Vivat!
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 25, 1991
The three bad girls of great literature are Medea (who murdered her kids to punish the husband who'd abandoned her for a trophy woman), Lady Macbeth (the original yuppie wife) and Flaubert's Emma Bovary who ruined her family and her life in search of an orgasm.But now it's the forgiving '90s and at last we can say: If she found it, maybe it was worth it.Claude Chabrol's re-creation of the great Flaubert novel has arrived at the Charles and it's everything a French movie of a French novel should be: studied, respectful, and somewhat abstracted.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013
How's this for a challenging role? A young girl travels through time with her younger sister. Oh, and she's determined to kill God. Still, Lauren Saunders was down for playing Lucy in Single Carrot Theatre 's "A Beginner's Guide to Deicide. " "I was attracted to this play because it challenges a lot of constructs - religion, gender, power and more," said Saunders, 25, who's a fellow with Single Carrot and also works for the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance. "It afforded me the opportunity to explore things as an actor that I had yet to explore.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | March 19, 2003
IN AN EFFORT to broaden my cultural horizons, I went to a Russian opera and I drank some Russian beer. I liked their beer better than their opera, but then again I probably feel that way about almost any country, except Italy. I took in the opera, Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk by Dmitri Shostakovich, and the beer, Baltika Porter and Zolotaya Bochka, while participating in the Vivat! festival honoring the 300th birthday of St. Petersburg, Russia. The opera was haunting and had some terrific dramatic effects, including the final scene in which the singers, trudging off to prison, get snowed on. Lemme tell you, that was a four-star snow!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The conniving politician at the center of the Netflix drama "House of Cards" is named Frank, but he's anything but honest, forthright and direct. His wife was christened Claire - an ironic choice for a woman who always has an ulterior motive. Even the couple's surname, "Underwood," hints at their hypocrisy by echoing "underhanded. " It's costume designer Johanna Argan's job to subliminally convey that duplicity to the audience through the clothes the characters wear. "The other characters think they're getting one thing from Frank and Claire," Argan said in a phone interview.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | March 19, 2003
IN AN EFFORT to broaden my cultural horizons, I went to a Russian opera and I drank some Russian beer. I liked their beer better than their opera, but then again I probably feel that way about almost any country, except Italy. I took in the opera, Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk by Dmitri Shostakovich, and the beer, Baltika Porter and Zolotaya Bochka, while participating in the Vivat! festival honoring the 300th birthday of St. Petersburg, Russia. The opera was haunting and had some terrific dramatic effects, including the final scene in which the singers, trudging off to prison, get snowed on. Lemme tell you, that was a four-star snow!
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 24, 2003
The truth, Oscar Wilde said, is rarely pure and never simple. The same can be said of Katerina Ismailova, the complex character who drives Dmitri Shostakovich's operatic masterwork, Lady Macbeth of Mtsesnk. In freeing herself from a mundane existence as a rich merchant's wife, she discovers new passions inside her, leading to catastrophe for herself and others. There's no mistaking the bad things that result -- three murders, for a start -- but it's impossible to think of Katerina as a clear-cut case of evil, which is one reason why she will never lose her fascination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | February 16, 2003
Three murders, a couple of floggings and sexual assaults, a suicide and the most X-rated music -- yes, music -- in all of opera. Even some late-night cable TV shows pale next to Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, the brilliant creation by Dmitri Shostakovich that incensed Josef Stalin and caused the composer to be labeled an "enemy of the people." The work, which will be performed for the first time by the Baltimore Opera Company as part of the Vivat! St. Petersburg festival, can still raise eyebrows and earlobes, but few operagoers these days end up siding with Stalin.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 3, 2002
An earthy, brutal opera that offended Stalin, and an Oriental-flavored gem from the French repertoire are among the works planned for the Baltimore Opera Company's 2002-2003 season. These two jolts of novelty - Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk by Dmitri Shostakovich and Lakme by Leo Delibes - will be balanced by such perennial favorites as Giuseppe Verdi's Rigoletto, Johann Strauss' Die Fledermaus and Giacomo Puccini's Madama Butterfly. The Shostakovich production is Baltimore Opera's contribution to "Vivat!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 19, 2000
A slight, impish Lady Macbeth? Not so outlandish with Pippa Pearthree in the role. Nearly 20 years ago, when Pippa Pearthree was playing Ophelia in Joseph Papp's production of "Hamlet" at the New York Shakespeare Festival, the late great impresario told her: "The part for you is going to be Lady Macbeth." Now Center Stage is giving her a chance to see if Papp was right. Beginning Friday, Pearthree will be the one urging Macbeth (played by Ritchie Coster) to "screw your courage to the sticking place."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | April 11, 1999
After a long winter of discontent, many readers must be yearning for a bit of comic relief. Fortunately, several authors have come to the rescue with new works that should help to ease the post-impeachment, bombing-the-Balkans blues. At the top of the list is Christopher Buckley's novel "Little Green Men" (Random House, 301 pages, $23.95), a wonderful spoof of pompous Washington politicians, conniving bureaucrats and UFO fanatics. Buckley's unlikely hero is a television pundit who is abducted by aliens during a golf game at his country club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Shelden and Michael Shelden,Special to the Sun | April 11, 1999
After a long winter of discontent, many readers must be yearning for a bit of comic relief. Fortunately, several authors have come to the rescue with new works that should help to ease the post-impeachment, bombing-the-Balkans blues. At the top of the list is Christopher Buckley's novel "Little Green Men" (Random House, 301 pages, $23.95), a wonderful spoof of pompous Washington politicians, conniving bureaucrats and UFO fanatics. Buckley's unlikely hero is a television pundit who is abducted by aliens during a golf game at his country club.
NEWS
By Geraldine Segal | March 10, 1994
Verdi's "Macbeth" opens Saturday at the Lyric, featuring Baltimore-born bass James Morris and the Baltimore Opera.Here, a Baltimore opera buff's irreverent account of the action, with apologies to Shakespeare and Verdi. Warning: If you don't know how this tragedy comes out, stop reading now.Three groups of witches on a heath appearWith prophecies for Macbeth that he's eager to hear.He'll become Thane of Cawder and then Scotland's king.Banquo will father royalty; that's the news that they bring.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 25, 1991
The three bad girls of great literature are Medea (who murdered her kids to punish the husband who'd abandoned her for a trophy woman), Lady Macbeth (the original yuppie wife) and Flaubert's Emma Bovary who ruined her family and her life in search of an orgasm.But now it's the forgiving '90s and at last we can say: If she found it, maybe it was worth it.Claude Chabrol's re-creation of the great Flaubert novel has arrived at the Charles and it's everything a French movie of a French novel should be: studied, respectful, and somewhat abstracted.
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