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Lady Bird Johnson

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NEWS
July 21, 2006
Kathy L. Cash, a former White House secretary who later worked in marketing and sales, died at Maryland Shock Trauma Center July 13 of injuries suffered in an automobile accident last year and complications from diabetes. The Severn resident was 59. Kathy L. Shinn was born in Paterson, N.J., and raised in Prince George's County. She was a 1965 graduate of Northwestern High School in Hyattsville and Strayer's Business College in Washington. She was a secretary at the U.S. Department of Agriculture before becoming an assistant secretary to first lady Lady Bird Johnson in 1967.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Kenneth O'Donnell, aide to President John F. Kennedy, stepped into a small cubicle at Parkland Hospital, where Vice President Lyndon Baines Johnson nervously waited with his wife and several aides to learn the condition of the president. Kennedy had been shot as his motorcade made its way through downtown Dallas on a sun-splashed November autumn afternoon. "He's gone," O'Donnell said to Johnson, who through an assassin's hand had become the 36th president of the United States. It was 1:30 p.m. Central Standard Time, Nov. 22, 1963.
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NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
Lady Bird Johnson, the widow of Lyndon B. Johnson, whose tumultuous presidency often overshadowed her considerable achievements as an activist first lady and environmentalist, died yesterday at her home in Austin, Texas. She was 94. Mrs. Johnson, who suffered a major stroke in 2002 and had been in failing health for several years, died surrounded by family and friends, including daughters Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Baines Johnson, said family spokeswoman Elizabeth Christian. As the wife of the 36th president, Mrs. Johnson was often portrayed by contemporaries and some historians as a meek woman who silently endured her husband's volcanic outbursts and infidelities.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 15, 2007
AUSTIN, Texas -- Past the images of escalating chaos in Vietnam, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and the triumph of mankind's entry into space, at the top of a marble staircase at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library here, was Lady Bird Johnson. Her coffin draped simply and unadorned by flowers as thousands of mourners filed past, Johnson, as she so often did in life, once again offered a bit of calm amid the tumult of history vividly on display all around her. Johnson died Tuesday at age 94, and at her funeral yesterday afternoon at the Riverbend Centre church, representatives of first families stretching back half a century to the Eisenhower administration came to pay their condolences.
NEWS
July 14, 2007
BUSINESS DOW +45.52 13,907.25 NASDAQ +5.27 2,707.00 S&P +4.80 1,552.50 SUN INDEX +0.10 349.48 MARYLAND Kids learn safety skills at camp Havre de Grace campers learn how to protect themselves from boating, bicycling and pool accidents, meeting firefighters, police officers and emergency workers in a mix of classroom lessons and hands-on activities.pg 5B Burned church beset by debt Just days before a 140-year-old church in West Baltimore was destroyed by fire, the nonprofit corporation that owns it was twice threatened with foreclosure on both the historic house of worship and a separate, 9-acre plot purchased in 2002.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 15, 2007
AUSTIN, Texas -- Past the images of escalating chaos in Vietnam, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and the triumph of mankind's entry into space, at the top of a marble staircase at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library here, was Lady Bird Johnson. Her coffin draped simply and unadorned by flowers as thousands of mourners filed past, Johnson, as she so often did in life, once again offered a bit of calm amid the tumult of history vividly on display all around her. Johnson died Tuesday at age 94, and at her funeral yesterday afternoon at the Riverbend Centre church, representatives of first families stretching back half a century to the Eisenhower administration came to pay their condolences.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | July 14, 2007
AUSTIN, Texas -- Shelley Hoelscher spent a long time standing in the hot sun, a young son and baby girl in tow, for a chance to pay her respects to Lady Bird Johnson during an emotional public viewing yesterday. She could almost feel the cool air from the entrance when she was amazed to see Luci Johnson Turpin, the former first lady's daughter, greeting her mother's admirers as they came through the door of the Lyndon B. Johnson Library and Museum. "Thank you so much for coming to your library," Turpin said.
NEWS
By Martin Merzer and Martin Merzer,House Appropriations Committee/MIAMI HERALD NEWS GRAPHICKnight-Ridder News Service | November 28, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Weep not for George Bush.Like all former presidents -- and we sure have a lot of them these days -- Mr. Bush will be able to preserve much of the lifestyle to which he has grown accustomed. Courtesy of the U.S. taxpayer.More than $20 million will be spent next year on the care and comfort of Mr. Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald R. Ford and Richard M. Nixon, making them the most expensive wards of the state in history.Even Lady Bird Johnson still receives a modest pension and some other benefits.
NEWS
May 8, 2006
Sidney Seidenberg, 81, a longtime manager for B.B. King and other musicians, died Wednesday in Dover Town, N.J. He had kidney disease and heart problems. He was born in Poland and immigrated to the United States when he was 5. He was drafted into the Army in 1943 and later worked as an accountant before becoming manager for Mr. King, as well as the Temptations and Gladys Knight. He owned SASCO Productions in New York City for 35 years before poor health caused him to retire from the management business in 2000.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - It is the rite of passage for all first ladies: picking the personal cause. Yesterday, Laura Bush joined in the tradition, announcing early childhood education as her signature issue and promising to use her celebrity to promote it. She marked the occasion at Cesar Chavez Elementary School in Hyattsville with a speech, a visit with students and an enthusiastic reading of the book "If You Give a Pig a Pancake." With flashbulbs popping, Bush stepped into her shoes as national education pitchwoman with the poise of a glammed-up substitute teacher, smiling in a periwinkle blue suit under a sign promising "Reading is Fun."
NEWS
July 14, 2007
BUSINESS DOW +45.52 13,907.25 NASDAQ +5.27 2,707.00 S&P +4.80 1,552.50 SUN INDEX +0.10 349.48 MARYLAND Kids learn safety skills at camp Havre de Grace campers learn how to protect themselves from boating, bicycling and pool accidents, meeting firefighters, police officers and emergency workers in a mix of classroom lessons and hands-on activities.pg 5B Burned church beset by debt Just days before a 140-year-old church in West Baltimore was destroyed by fire, the nonprofit corporation that owns it was twice threatened with foreclosure on both the historic house of worship and a separate, 9-acre plot purchased in 2002.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | July 14, 2007
AUSTIN, Texas -- Shelley Hoelscher spent a long time standing in the hot sun, a young son and baby girl in tow, for a chance to pay her respects to Lady Bird Johnson during an emotional public viewing yesterday. She could almost feel the cool air from the entrance when she was amazed to see Luci Johnson Turpin, the former first lady's daughter, greeting her mother's admirers as they came through the door of the Lyndon B. Johnson Library and Museum. "Thank you so much for coming to your library," Turpin said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 14, 2007
Lady Bird Johnson, the widow of President Lyndon B. Johnson who died this week, made several visits to Baltimore before, during and after her husband's years in Washington. Baltimoreans got their first glimpse of her during the presidential campaign of 1960, when she "brought a white-gloved touch of Texas" to the city, reported The Sun. The first reception, attended by 500 women, was held in the Guilford home of Dr. Mildred Otenesak, a Democratic national committeewoman. Otenesak told reporters she was "overwhelmed" at the turnout -- which included Helen Avalynne Tawes, wife of Gov. J. Millard Tawes -- since she had expected no more than 300 women at the reception.
NEWS
By Elaine Woo and Elaine Woo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 2007
Lady Bird Johnson, the widow of Lyndon B. Johnson, whose tumultuous presidency often overshadowed her considerable achievements as an activist first lady and environmentalist, died yesterday at her home in Austin, Texas. She was 94. Mrs. Johnson, who suffered a major stroke in 2002 and had been in failing health for several years, died surrounded by family and friends, including daughters Lynda Johnson Robb and Luci Baines Johnson, said family spokeswoman Elizabeth Christian. As the wife of the 36th president, Mrs. Johnson was often portrayed by contemporaries and some historians as a meek woman who silently endured her husband's volcanic outbursts and infidelities.
NEWS
July 21, 2006
Kathy L. Cash, a former White House secretary who later worked in marketing and sales, died at Maryland Shock Trauma Center July 13 of injuries suffered in an automobile accident last year and complications from diabetes. The Severn resident was 59. Kathy L. Shinn was born in Paterson, N.J., and raised in Prince George's County. She was a 1965 graduate of Northwestern High School in Hyattsville and Strayer's Business College in Washington. She was a secretary at the U.S. Department of Agriculture before becoming an assistant secretary to first lady Lady Bird Johnson in 1967.
NEWS
May 8, 2006
Sidney Seidenberg, 81, a longtime manager for B.B. King and other musicians, died Wednesday in Dover Town, N.J. He had kidney disease and heart problems. He was born in Poland and immigrated to the United States when he was 5. He was drafted into the Army in 1943 and later worked as an accountant before becoming manager for Mr. King, as well as the Temptations and Gladys Knight. He owned SASCO Productions in New York City for 35 years before poor health caused him to retire from the management business in 2000.
NEWS
By Barbara Friedman | March 19, 2003
THROUGHOUT THE 2000 campaign, Laura Bush was asked which past first lady she would most be like. "I think I'll just be like Laura Bush," she said. Most importantly, the Bush team wanted to assure the public that the new first lady would not be like Hillary Clinton. She prefers cleaning out the cabinets to cleaning out the Cabinet. Hot chili, not heated debate. After daughter Jenna's appendectomy, Mrs. Bush was at her bedside, not taking on the health care system. As another symbolic gesture, she relocated the first lady's office from the West Wing (where Mrs. Clinton had moved it)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Kenneth O'Donnell, aide to President John F. Kennedy, stepped into a small cubicle at Parkland Hospital, where Vice President Lyndon Baines Johnson nervously waited with his wife and several aides to learn the condition of the president. Kennedy had been shot as his motorcade made its way through downtown Dallas on a sun-splashed November autumn afternoon. "He's gone," O'Donnell said to Johnson, who through an assassin's hand had become the 36th president of the United States. It was 1:30 p.m. Central Standard Time, Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
By Barbara Friedman | March 19, 2003
THROUGHOUT THE 2000 campaign, Laura Bush was asked which past first lady she would most be like. "I think I'll just be like Laura Bush," she said. Most importantly, the Bush team wanted to assure the public that the new first lady would not be like Hillary Clinton. She prefers cleaning out the cabinets to cleaning out the Cabinet. Hot chili, not heated debate. After daughter Jenna's appendectomy, Mrs. Bush was at her bedside, not taking on the health care system. As another symbolic gesture, she relocated the first lady's office from the West Wing (where Mrs. Clinton had moved it)
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - It is the rite of passage for all first ladies: picking the personal cause. Yesterday, Laura Bush joined in the tradition, announcing early childhood education as her signature issue and promising to use her celebrity to promote it. She marked the occasion at Cesar Chavez Elementary School in Hyattsville with a speech, a visit with students and an enthusiastic reading of the book "If You Give a Pig a Pancake." With flashbulbs popping, Bush stepped into her shoes as national education pitchwoman with the poise of a glammed-up substitute teacher, smiling in a periwinkle blue suit under a sign promising "Reading is Fun."
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