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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
Even though he died nearly a quarter of a century ago, Harvey S. Ladew's 250-acre landmark estate on Jarrettsville Pike near Monkton continues to draw more than 30,000 visitors a year from 40 countries. They come to visit its 22 acres of formal gardens and legendary topiary that the Garden Club of America has designated "the finest topiary garden in America." Known formally as Pleasant Valley Farm and perhaps more commonly as Ladew Gardens, the 15 formal gardens and restored 18th-century manor house are the lasting vision and handiwork of Harvey S. Ladew, the wealthy raconteur, horseman, writer, collector, artist, gourmet, world traveler and horticulturist, who died at 89 in 1976.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Frances W. Riepe, a former interior decorator who had been a trustee of Ladew Topiary Gardens, died May 16 of congestive heart failure at her home in the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 91. The daughter of Francis Asbury Warner Jr., founder of the Warner-Graham Co., and Elsie McGee Warner, a homemaker, the former Frances Warner was born in Baltimore and raised on Hollen Road in Cedarcroft. She attended Bryn Mawr School and graduated in 1941 from the Knox School in Cooperstown, N.Y. In 1946, she married George Mitchell Stump Riepe, who later became president of the Warner-Graham Co. Mrs. Riepe earned a certificate in 1964 from the New York School of Interior Design and owned and operated an interior decorating firm from her Guilford home.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 25, 2003
Ladew Topiary Gardens begins its summer concert series this year with the MacMillan Pipe Band performing a Father's Day show at 6 p.m. June 15. The MacMillan Pipe Band features Scottish music on bagpipes and drums. Rain date is June 22. The summer concert series runs from June through August and features a variety of musical styles, from reggae to bluegrass, in the Great Bowl of the 22-acre flower and topiary gardens on Jarrettsville Pike. Admission includes self-guided tours of the gardens, and tickets are available at the door.
SPORTS
By Dewey Fox, Baltimore Sun Media Group and By Dewey Fox, Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 12, 2014
One week after a relatively sedate afternoon of races just down the road at Atlanta Hall Farm in Monkton, the Maryland Steeplechase Racing Triple Crown got started Saturday afternoon with the My Lady's Manor Races at Ladew Topiary Gardens. Jockey Jody Petty was the day's big winner as he rode to victory in the day's premier event, the 104th running of the My Lady's Manor Race. He followed that with another win less than an hour later in the John Rush Streett Memorial First Division.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2005
Elizabeth W. Constable, an avid gardener and a founder and trustee of the Harvey Smith Ladew Foundation that administers the Ladew home and its famous topiary gardens, died of heart failure Tuesday at Harmony Hall, her 125-acre Monkton farm and home for more than a half-century. She was 89. Born Elizabeth Whedbee in Baltimore, she was raised at Edgewood, her family's estate on Lake Avenue. She was educated at Notre Dame Preparatory School, Convent of the Sacred Heart in Noroton, Conn.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | October 8, 2006
REWIND A FEW DECADES and you could've said Ladew Topiary Gardens was the cat's pajamas last weekend. But pajamas were scarcely the style. Instead, think lots of fringes and feathers, headbands and pearls as guests celebrated Ladew's 35th anniversary at a 1920s-themed gala. Party co-chairs Wendy Griswold, Dudley Mason and Susie Reichhart were completely flapper-ized. "My signature thing is my fishnet stockings. I wear them to every event," announced Griswold, bedecked in a black feather boa. Though most of the men went the present-day black tie route, there were a couple of exceptions.
NEWS
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | January 30, 2000
When Cher is declared an "icon," and glamour clones like Jennifer Lopez are saluted for their "style," it's easy to argue that those words have lost their meaning. But there are people worthy of such terms. And they will be the focus of the Maryland Historical Society's "Icons of 20th-Century Style" exhibit on Feb. 11. In a day-long symposium, expert speakers will make presentations on local luminaries including fashion visionary Claire McCardell, famed epicure and horticulturist Harvey Ladew, music pioneer Eubie Blake and the Duchess of Windsor.
NEWS
April 13, 1996
The name of Mrs. E. Phillips "Bunny" Hathaway, former chairwoman of the Ladew garden committee, was reported incorrectly in a photo caption in yesterday's editions.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 4/13/96
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | June 9, 2005
Ladew Gardens has Bluegrass Where: 3535 Jarrettsville Pike, Monkton When: 6 p.m., Sunday Why: Take a blanket, picnic basket and folding chairs (no alcohol or pets), plunk yourself down near the flower and topiary gardens and watch the Shiloh Ridge Band wail traditional bluegrass tunes. Information: 410-557-9466, www.ladewgardens.com, $12; $10 for senior citizens and students; $7 members; $3 children
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | May 21, 1991
Rebecca Ladew has cerebral palsy and it shows.Her head is cocked at an angle.Her body is hunched and twisted.She needs a cane to walk.Her speech is slurred, tortured, punctuated by erratic fits and starts as she struggles to get her words out.Sometimes she closes her eyes -- so great is the apparent effort to speak. Sometimes she is forced to spell the word she wants. Sometimes spittle appears on her lips which she quickly wipes away.I know that this is a brutal description of Rebecca Ladew and I apologize to her.But I cannot observe the usual niceties here, for if I do, you are sure to miss the point about this northeast Baltimore woman.
NEWS
Special to The Aegis | December 10, 2013
Ladew Gardens in Monkton will celebrate Christmas in seasonal resplendence with its annual open house Dec. 13-15, as local floral designers and local garden clubs are invited to decorate the rooms of the circa 1747 Manor House, adorning the walls, tabletops and fireplace mantels in festive holiday splendor. In its 33rd year, Ladew's Christmas Open House, according to the event's organizers, has been called "one of Maryland's most memorable and decorative holiday events. " The Christmas Open House is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Some would say that Philip Krach is just a gardener, a man whose existence revolves around the seasons, the emergence of hundreds of iris blooms and roses in the spring, the relentless growth of weeds and grass in the summer, the quick disappearance of the perennials in the fall frost. But watch Krach take hold of a pair of electric hedge clippers at Ladew Topiary Gardens and attack the yew, carving perfect straight lines and curves that only he seems to see so clearly in his mind's eye. Working on a 10- to 15-foot high topiary seahorse, he wields the clippers as though they are an extension of his arms and hands, with a flick of the elbow or wrist this way or that producing a clean line.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Some would say that Philip Krach is just a gardener, a man whose existence revolves around the seasons, the emergence of hundreds of iris blooms and roses in the spring, the relentless growth of weeds and grass in the summer, the quick disappearance of the perennials in the fall frost. But watch Krach take hold of a pair of electric hedge clippers at Ladew Topiary Gardens and attack the yew, carving perfect straight lines and curves that only he seems to see so clearly in his mind's eye. Working on a 10- to 15-foot high topiary seahorse, he wields the clippers as though they are an extension of his arms and hands, with a flick of the elbow or wrist this way or that producing a clean line.
EXPLORE
By Julianne Peeling | April 15, 2013
What he does: Tyler Diehl oversees the design, planting and maintenance of 22 acres of lush gardens in Monkton. The Ladew property, which is 250 acres in total, includes a nature walk and 15 “garden rooms,” each with its own theme. While most of the design work takes place in the winter, along with seed-starting and mechanical maintenance, a typical day throughout the year involves cleaning, mulching and pruning. How he got his start: As a child, Diehl enjoyed playing outside, reveling in the plants of his own backyard.  “Then one day somebody said, 'You know, you can go to school for this,' ” he says.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | April 13, 2012
When the street sign said Boulton, I knew I was near the right address. Soon another familiar street name popped up — Atwood — and I was squarely in Bel Air's Howard Park, a subdivision created out of the orchards surrounding a noteworthy Baltimorean's summer home. Its formal name is Liriodendron, and it is a Harford County treasure. It was built by one of the Johns Hopkins Hospital's fabled "Big Four," Dr. Howard Atwood Kelly. Kelly spent most of the year at 1406 Eutaw Place in Baltimore, where he also had a private clinic in an adjoining building.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
With spring here, the change of season has Emily Emerick and her staff at Ladew Topiary Gardens hopping. Emerick, executive director of the historic house and gardens in Harford County, spent recent weeks prepping for the March 28 opening of the 2009 season. At Ladew, she's doing something she has loved since she was 4 years old. The Towson native's earliest memories revolve around watching her mother in a denim wrapped skirt and a bandanna preparing garden beds and planting rhubarb, asparagus and strawberries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 2, 1998
The House of Welsh, owned by the same family since 1900, closed its doors in downtown Baltimore in January. It's reopened in Fenwick Island, Del. The new place has much the same menu of steaks and seafood but much larger quarters. (It seats some 300.) Interestingly, it moved into the spot vacated by Galeano's at 1106 Ocean Highway. The Italian restaurant moved to Little Italy and reopened New Year's Eve at 413 S. High St.Brass Elephant at LadewThe Brass Elephant is taking over the cafe and catering business at Ladew Topiary Gardens, the 18th century estate in Monkton.
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
John Smith's first exploration into Harford County was during the summer of 1608. Even before that time, the area around the Chesapeake was full of history and artifacts. Each museum in the county documents a small piece of that history whether it is about the geology of the land, the people who lived on the land or the art inspired by the land. Here are some of the museums found in Harford County: The Concord Point Lighthouse at Lafayette and Concord streets in Havre de Grace is the oldest continuously operated lighthouse in Maryland.
NEWS
April 20, 2008
Ladew Topiary Gardens, 3535 Jarrettsville Pike, Monkton, is holding a series of talks by its professional gardeners, who will give behind-the-scenes views of plant care and demonstrations this spring and summer. "In the Garden" includes a nature walk at 9:30 a.m., before the program. The cost is $10 for nonmembers and free for members. Scheduled programs are: composting, May 1; guided walking tour of trees and shrubs, May 5; wisteria pruning, June 26; espalier pruning, July 1; yew shearing, July 8; pond care, July 15; climbing rose pruning, July 22; boxwood shearing, July 29; repotting, Aug. 12; turf maintenance, Aug. 19; hemlock shearing, Sept.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | April 13, 2008
Donna Hepner said she generally avoids nature whenever she can. But when the opportunity arose to take an outdoor art class, she took it. On a recent afternoon, she sat in a garden and sketched reflections of a tree in a pond, with ink, pencils, and charcoal. As she made marks on the paper, her work took on life. "When you create art outdoors you need to be relaxed and open," said Hepner, 41, of Joppa. "If you try to control nature, it doesn't work well." Hepner was one of several students who participated in art classes offered by the Maryland Institute College of Art at Ladew Topiary Gardens in Monkton.
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