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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 1, 2004
Ladder 49 should make a lot of people happy. That includes firefighters, who should appreciate what amounts to a big, heartfelt thank-you for all their good work; moviegoers yearning for a grand, but uncomplicated, action flick that's unabashedly sentimental, but not maudlin; and Baltimoreans of all stripes, who should get a kick out of seeing their city in all its glory (and not sitting in for Cleveland or D.C. or some other burg). Directed by Jay Russell (My Dog Skip, Tuck Everlasting)
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NEWS
November 4, 2012
'Saturday Night Fever' (1977) Travolta earned his first Oscar nomination — and proved he was more than Vinnie Barbarino on TV's "Welcome Back, Kotter" — as the Brooklyn teenager who becomes a big man on the disco dance floor. "It was a great beginning. I was grateful for it. " 'Grease' (1978) Travolta was the first choice to play Danny, who falls in love with Olivia Newton-John's good girl, Sandy, and frets over whether his tough-guy image can survive their romance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
Baltimore's a little less star-studded these days. After spending five months plus filming Ladder 49, the Disney flick about firefighters, the film's major players packed up and left just before July 4. But not before cutting loose at the cast and crew wrap party June 28 at Red Tapas. Diane Macklin (known on WQSR Radio as the irrepressible "Downtown Diane") was helping restaurant owner Jerry Edwards that night, and claims to have spotted all the film's stars minus the biggie. John Travolta is said to have left town by then.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | September 3, 2007
Melissa Lynn "Stanley" Cohen, a Baltimore film production coordinator who worked on movies including Failure to Launch and Ladder 49, died of breast cancer Wednesday at Mercy Medical Center. She was 36. Cohen, who grew up in Ellicott City, graduated from Mount Hebron High School in 1989. She attended classes at Catonsville Community College but quit to follow her mother, a hair and makeup artist, into the film industry. She moved to Los Angles when she was 18. After finding she wasn't getting her calls returned in the male-dominated film world, she borrowed her dad's name and began sending out resumes as "Stanley Cohen."
NEWS
By Kathryn Hansen and Kathryn Hansen,Baltimoresun.com Staff | September 16, 2004
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and other city officials today announced a schedule of special events leading up to, and including, an advanced screening of the movie Ladder 49, filmed locally. The drama about firefighters with the Baltimore City Fire Department and their families stars John Travolta as Fire Chief Kennedy and Joaquin Phoenix as young firefighter Jack Morrison. The movie is scheduled to open Oct. 1 at theaters nationwide. "Ladder 49 is a powerful depiction of the lives of firefighters in Baltimore City and throughout our nation," O'Malley said in a statement.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
The most realistic parts of Ladder 49, the new film shot in Baltimore and starring John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix, are the things that movie-goers will never see on-screen. They won't see Baltimore Fire Lt. Mark Yant standing just inside the door of a burning home, ready to spring into action if the film's deliberately set fires began to rage out of control and an actor became trapped. They won't see the cameras wrapped in fire-retardant material, and the crew - camera operators, gaffers and sound supervisors - suited up in firefighters' gear.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
Morris Chestnut didn't pursue acting for its elusive promise of fame and glory. Though recently, a steady flow of roles in mainstream films has kept Chestnut's resume growing, the thought of becoming a household name doesn't charm him at all. Right now, he's content with landing medium-sized characters such as Tommy Drake in Ladder 49 (which opens tomorrow)and keeping his career rolling. "A lot of people get into the industry because they want to be famous," Chestnut said. "I just want to have the lifestyle of being able to be flexible.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2003
Jay Russell didn't set out to be the poster boy for family-friendly movies. But if that's what he's becoming only three films into his directing career, it's OK by him. Russell's first effort, 1988's End of the Line, followed a group of railroad workers who commandeer a locomotive and head for corporate headquarters in an effort to keep the company from closing. A dozen years later, he returned with My Dog Skip, with Frankie Muniz as an outcast young boy whose best friend is his terrier.
NEWS
By Francine Halvorsen and Francine Halvorsen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 9, 2003
For the last three months, some of the best food in this city was not served in a restaurant but from the sides of catering trucks. Grilled swordfish and mango salsa, fillet of beef with bearnaise sauce, pasta primavera, Caesar salads, Key lime pie, fresh fruit tarts and chocolate brownies were among the tempting dishes prepared for the stars, cast and crew of Ladder 49, the action movie starring John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix, which wrapped up...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 31, 2003
The controversial City of God, director Fernando Meirelles' drama of teen-age gangs doing what they must to survive in the poorest sections of Rio de Janeiro, is this weekend's scheduled feature for Cinema Sundays at the Charles. Critics who have seen the movie, which has yet to be scheduled for a Baltimore opening, have used such terms as "horrifying," "shocking" and "sobering" in describing its take on the violence seemingly endemic to the poorest sections of Brazil's coastal city, places where the rule of law is virtually non-existent and street gangs enforce their own brand of justice.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | April 19, 2005
VIP SECURITY Unlimited's headquarters is at the bitter end of Biddle Street in East Baltimore, in the silent, rusting Armco Steel plant. Inside, the rooms are dark and the cold hangs heavy. Then, William H. "B.J." Spencer Jr. opens the door to his office and the heat flows. It's like a bachelor pad, with dim lights, overstuffed furniture and a sleek, gray 57-inch big-screen TV. Then there are the pictures, neatly arranged with Spencer and the clients he and his employees have protected: John Travolta, Chris Rock, Vivica A. Fox and Lynn Whitfield.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 3, 2004
Movie stars John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix want to be like firefighters. Better yet, they want to be like Baltimore firefighters! How cool is that? "They're the most humble, modest group of people I know," says Travolta, who plays a fire chief in Ladder 49, the recently released ode to firefighters that was filmed and set in Baltimore. "Their humanity seeps out of them, but they don't want to be looked on as heroes. That's why I love them so much." To Phoenix, whose Jack Morrison is the firefighter at the center of Ladder 49, the resilience of Baltimore's elite was impressive.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 1, 2004
Ladder 49 should make a lot of people happy. That includes firefighters, who should appreciate what amounts to a big, heartfelt thank-you for all their good work; moviegoers yearning for a grand, but uncomplicated, action flick that's unabashedly sentimental, but not maudlin; and Baltimoreans of all stripes, who should get a kick out of seeing their city in all its glory (and not sitting in for Cleveland or D.C. or some other burg). Directed by Jay Russell (My Dog Skip, Tuck Everlasting)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
Morris Chestnut didn't pursue acting for its elusive promise of fame and glory. Though recently, a steady flow of roles in mainstream films has kept Chestnut's resume growing, the thought of becoming a household name doesn't charm him at all. Right now, he's content with landing medium-sized characters such as Tommy Drake in Ladder 49 (which opens tomorrow)and keeping his career rolling. "A lot of people get into the industry because they want to be famous," Chestnut said. "I just want to have the lifestyle of being able to be flexible.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 2004
Folks at the Baltimore City firefighters awards ceremony at the Marriott Waterfront Sunday night, and those at the Ladder 49 premiere at the Senator weren't the only ones to get "up close and personal" with the Disney movie's stars this week. Seems some unsuspecting diners found themselves with thrilling company at a couple of local restaurants Sunday. After the big awards ceremony that night, Ladder 49 actors John Travolta, Robert Patrick, Kevin Chapman and Billy Burke joined some of Baltimore's F.D. brass and their families for dinner in the Fleming's private dining room.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2004
The most realistic parts of Ladder 49, the new film shot in Baltimore and starring John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix, are the things that movie-goers will never see on-screen. They won't see Baltimore Fire Lt. Mark Yant standing just inside the door of a burning home, ready to spring into action if the film's deliberately set fires began to rage out of control and an actor became trapped. They won't see the cameras wrapped in fire-retardant material, and the crew - camera operators, gaffers and sound supervisors - suited up in firefighters' gear.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | September 3, 2007
Melissa Lynn "Stanley" Cohen, a Baltimore film production coordinator who worked on movies including Failure to Launch and Ladder 49, died of breast cancer Wednesday at Mercy Medical Center. She was 36. Cohen, who grew up in Ellicott City, graduated from Mount Hebron High School in 1989. She attended classes at Catonsville Community College but quit to follow her mother, a hair and makeup artist, into the film industry. She moved to Los Angles when she was 18. After finding she wasn't getting her calls returned in the male-dominated film world, she borrowed her dad's name and began sending out resumes as "Stanley Cohen."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 3, 2004
Movie stars John Travolta and Joaquin Phoenix want to be like firefighters. Better yet, they want to be like Baltimore firefighters! How cool is that? "They're the most humble, modest group of people I know," says Travolta, who plays a fire chief in Ladder 49, the recently released ode to firefighters that was filmed and set in Baltimore. "Their humanity seeps out of them, but they don't want to be looked on as heroes. That's why I love them so much." To Phoenix, whose Jack Morrison is the firefighter at the center of Ladder 49, the resilience of Baltimore's elite was impressive.
NEWS
By Kathryn Hansen and Kathryn Hansen,Baltimoresun.com Staff | September 16, 2004
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley and other city officials today announced a schedule of special events leading up to, and including, an advanced screening of the movie Ladder 49, filmed locally. The drama about firefighters with the Baltimore City Fire Department and their families stars John Travolta as Fire Chief Kennedy and Joaquin Phoenix as young firefighter Jack Morrison. The movie is scheduled to open Oct. 1 at theaters nationwide. "Ladder 49 is a powerful depiction of the lives of firefighters in Baltimore City and throughout our nation," O'Malley said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | July 13, 2003
Baltimore's a little less star-studded these days. After spending five months plus filming Ladder 49, the Disney flick about firefighters, the film's major players packed up and left just before July 4. But not before cutting loose at the cast and crew wrap party June 28 at Red Tapas. Diane Macklin (known on WQSR Radio as the irrepressible "Downtown Diane") was helping restaurant owner Jerry Edwards that night, and claims to have spotted all the film's stars minus the biggie. John Travolta is said to have left town by then.
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